It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Why do people send 8 short texts instead of one?

page: 3
5
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 30 2018 @ 03:20 AM
link   
a reply to: DigginFoTroof

I don't understand why people send texts,why not call someone and get point over with,afraid of speaking? dumbest thing I've seen,have seen people fired for texting




posted on Oct, 30 2018 @ 03:47 AM
link   
My husband likes to text throughout his work night. Sometimes he turbo-texts short ones, sometimes he texts long multi-text musings.
I have Tracfone, A 3 month service package & and extra 1000 texts run me $35, so I don't mind. After tax, it's something like $12 bucks and change per month. Even if he turbo-texts me enough to need a second 1000 text booster, it's still significantly cheaper than what other people get suckered into paying for cell service.

Being one of the bosses, he can get away with texting from work at any time unless he's in a meeting. His company is pretty lax on texting-while-working for all employees, they tested out a texting-friendly policy a few years ago, and it surprised them. In his opinion & the opinion of the bean counters, it actually boosts morale and production output if people can keep connected to their significant others/families while working.
The catch is that you have to be mindful of the difference between a few quick texts and doing nothing but, and of your duties -- if the machine you're operating doesn't allow for a long enough attention break to text, then you don't text. It seems the employees are really good about being mindful about both.

His texts are usually passing thoughts, random questions, or something relating to a prior conversation. Or sometimes just an emoticon. I'e had my fair share of quick succession one-liners, it's not a big deal. If I paid more for my service, it might be, but at this cheap of a cost, I really don't care.



posted on Oct, 30 2018 @ 10:04 AM
link   
a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Dude, that is a lot of angst for just some extra texts.



posted on Oct, 30 2018 @ 06:21 PM
link   

originally posted by: DigginFoTroof

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: CharlesT
Why not just dial the number and talk?


Yeah, I don't understand why people even want to text in the first place. They have this new invention, see, where you can pick up a device and talk to people that are far away with your actual voice; and you can even hear their voice in reply! It totally obsoletes that persnicketty telegraph system where you just send a message in text. I don't know why all my friends say I need to join the 21st Century, when they're the one's stuck using 19th Century-type technology. Sheesh! I don't even own a cell-phone - because I don't need one. My telephone hangs on the wall and I use it to call people. That's all I need it to do - I already have a lot of other devices that already serve other purposes and have done so for a long time. I don't need those same services all tied up together.



So if someone is going to pick up dinner (say a pizza at the local pizza shop), they leave and are driving but you realize you are out of drinks. Wouldn't it be fine to send a text "pick up a 2L of soda too". I would think that would be better than calling and talking while driving.


So texting and driving is ever so much safer?????



posted on Oct, 30 2018 @ 09:23 PM
link   

originally posted by: Nyiah
if people can keep connected to their significant others/families while working.


See, that's what I don't understand. Before cell-phones came along, most, probably all, businesses had telephones. Why didn't people want to keep connected to their families then? They could phone home. Apparently, they didn't care to be continually connected. What changed? I think cell-phones are mostly a fad and most people get them because everybody else is getting them. They don't really really need them. I think they have to "justify" having them by contiunally using them. Those same people had the choice to choose a technology that already existed before cell-phones, but they didn't employ the technology. Heck, I saw somebody that had a car-phone back in the 1950s on an episode of I Love Lucy. But, most people didn't feel the need to be "connected" all the time while at home or away from home. When and why did this change?



posted on Oct, 31 2018 @ 07:01 PM
link   

originally posted by: DigginFoTroof

originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Sorry but us old people text like we speak. guilty as charged!


Wow, old people do this? I figured it was a younger person thing.

you know text IS NOT instant messenger. Text is like twitter, you fill it up if you have more than one thing to say.

Get a few questions in a text. respond with all the answers in one text.

I'd want to shove the phone down the person's throat that does this. How stupid are they? No offense, but the lack of self awareness and thinking that the other person just loves to hear the constant "ring/notification" for 20 texts in 60-100 seconds is a selfish SOB.

if this is the case, I'm going to figure out how to make the phone companies start charging per text for everyone. That will be my new goal. I'm sure they will be happy b/c there is always a way to manipulate them when it brings in more money - they will love it and it will teach discourteous people some self restraint and manners.


the last time i got a txt was like 8 months ago and it was from my mom asking me to enable data because she sent lots of Whatsapp msgs and i wasn't getting them

I don't remember sending a txt since like 1 year ago or more. what's the need? you can send a msg through WhatsApp or line or whatever and send pictures or audio msgs if the other person is not responding, i don't get why not just use that instead of the limited texts thing, if they are offline the a call fixes it but who wastes time with old txts?

Also i dont call a lot because its easier to just send an audio and they will reply when possible, with another audio or with a msg, so no need to use the phone app all the time, and txts are too limited

But yeah it is annoying to get 100 msgs that says what you could say on 2 or 3 big ones, even on whatsapp



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 08:44 AM
link   

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah
if people can keep connected to their significant others/families while working.

But, most people didn't feel the need to be "connected" all the time while at home or away from home. When and why did this change?


I find it interesting and atypical that nobody is responding to my last question.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 12:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: BoneSay

originally posted by: DigginFoTroof

originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Sorry but us old people text like we speak. guilty as charged!


Wow, old people do this? I figured it was a younger person thing.

you know text IS NOT instant messenger. Text is like twitter, you fill it up if you have more than one thing to say.

Get a few questions in a text. respond with all the answers in one text.

I'd want to shove the phone down the person's throat that does this. How stupid are they? No offense, but the lack of self awareness and thinking that the other person just loves to hear the constant "ring/notification" for 20 texts in 60-100 seconds is a selfish SOB.

if this is the case, I'm going to figure out how to make the phone companies start charging per text for everyone. That will be my new goal. I'm sure they will be happy b/c there is always a way to manipulate them when it brings in more money - they will love it and it will teach discourteous people some self restraint and manners.

its easier to just send an audio and they will reply when possible


You're so right! Who wants to talk to real people like family and friends when you can just send a message and never have to deal with real people in person.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 02:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: BoneSay

originally posted by: DigginFoTroof

originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Sorry but us old people text like we speak. guilty as charged!


Wow, old people do this? I figured it was a younger person thing.

you know text IS NOT instant messenger. Text is like twitter, you fill it up if you have more than one thing to say.

Get a few questions in a text. respond with all the answers in one text.

I'd want to shove the phone down the person's throat that does this. How stupid are they? No offense, but the lack of self awareness and thinking that the other person just loves to hear the constant "ring/notification" for 20 texts in 60-100 seconds is a selfish SOB.

if this is the case, I'm going to figure out how to make the phone companies start charging per text for everyone. That will be my new goal. I'm sure they will be happy b/c there is always a way to manipulate them when it brings in more money - they will love it and it will teach discourteous people some self restraint and manners.

its easier to just send an audio and they will reply when possible


You're so right! Who wants to talk to real people like family and friends when you can just send a message and never have to deal with real people in person.


yes it is easier some times. i live in Mexico and my mom lives in Moscow, it is like 2 pm back there when it is 5 am here, so i send audio messages and go to sleep then she wakes up and replies and i listen to them once im awake, not everyone lives on the same part of the world or timezone, and sometimes it is not possible to call because of this.

Sometimes tech do help in remaining connected to family

By the time i am out of school at 3 pm she is already asleep and we can't call, but we remain on contact through audio messages which we listen when we have a chance
edit on 2-11-2018 by BoneSay because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 02:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah
if people can keep connected to their significant others/families while working.

But, most people didn't feel the need to be "connected" all the time while at home or away from home. When and why did this change?


I find it interesting and atypical that nobody is responding to my last question.

My hubs works a 12 hour** overnight shift, and most of the coworkers are Boomers & older. Perhaps the answer to your question lies in the realization that they're away from home half the day or longer and keeping in real-time contact when able throughout the night, not just at a scheduled break, is a legit boost to morale.

Gone are the days of dad working at the factory 16 hours a day and not giving a s# about anything & sequestering himself away with a cigar and a stiff drink when he gets home. He conveys the s#s he has to give when he has a few minutes to spare throughout the workday.
edit on 11/2/2018 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)


**Edit: Technically 14 hours some days. He clocks in as early 4pm and out at 6am.
edit on 11/2/2018 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 02:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah
if people can keep connected to their significant others/families while working.

But, most people didn't feel the need to be "connected" all the time while at home or away from home. When and why did this change?


I find it interesting and atypical that nobody is responding to my last question.

My hubs works a 12 hour** overnight shift, and most of the coworkers are Boomers & older. Perhaps the answer to your question lies in the realization that they're away from home half the day or longer and keeping in real-time contact when able throughout the night, not just at a scheduled break, is a legit boost to morale.

Gone are the days of dad working at the factory 16 hours a day and not giving a s# about anything & sequestering himself away with a cigar and a stiff drink when he gets home.


When were those days? My dad worked 8 hours a day in the 1960s and 1970s, like all the other dads, and mothers didn't have to work at all. I didn't know anybody's dad who worked 16 hours a day and came home to stiff drinks. Perhaps it's because of the times we live in that both parents have to work just to get by, the kids get less attention and everybody has to use cell-phones just to be able to interact with their family members. If that's the case, we, as Americans in general, need to find a way to get back to "The American Way of Life." Before technology took over and stole our lives.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 03:05 PM
link   

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah
if people can keep connected to their significant others/families while working.

But, most people didn't feel the need to be "connected" all the time while at home or away from home. When and why did this change?


I find it interesting and atypical that nobody is responding to my last question.

My hubs works a 12 hour** overnight shift, and most of the coworkers are Boomers & older. Perhaps the answer to your question lies in the realization that they're away from home half the day or longer and keeping in real-time contact when able throughout the night, not just at a scheduled break, is a legit boost to morale.

Gone are the days of dad working at the factory 16 hours a day and not giving a s# about anything & sequestering himself away with a cigar and a stiff drink when he gets home.


When were those days? My dad worked 8 hours a day in the 1960s and 1970s, like all the other dads, and mothers didn't have to work at all. I didn't know anybody's dad who worked 16 hours a day and came home to stiff drinks. Perhaps it's because of the times we live in that both parents have to work just to get by, the kids get less attention and everybody has to use cell-phones just to be able to interact with their family members. If that's the case, we, as Americans in general, need to find a way to get back to "The American Way of Life." Before technology took over and stole our lives.


Funny, I thought I already was, being the SAH parent while he works a job he genuinely likes and brings in enough to support the fam without a second job needed. Being able to keep in touch while he runs a department 12 hours a day (3 days one week, 4 the next, it's a great schedule) is just gravy.

Maybe you need to get it through your head that different companies operate differently, and there are payoffs to their methods in some cases. My husband's company is pulling a solid profit & hand all employees both small Christmas and sizable annual bonuses as standard practice, I don't think they give a s# what you think about their on-the-clock cell use policy.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 10:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah
if people can keep connected to their significant others/families while working.

But, most people didn't feel the need to be "connected" all the time while at home or away from home. When and why did this change?


I find it interesting and atypical that nobody is responding to my last question.

My hubs works a 12 hour** overnight shift, and most of the coworkers are Boomers & older. Perhaps the answer to your question lies in the realization that they're away from home half the day or longer and keeping in real-time contact when able throughout the night, not just at a scheduled break, is a legit boost to morale.

Gone are the days of dad working at the factory 16 hours a day and not giving a s# about anything & sequestering himself away with a cigar and a stiff drink when he gets home.


When were those days? My dad worked 8 hours a day in the 1960s and 1970s, like all the other dads, and mothers didn't have to work at all. I didn't know anybody's dad who worked 16 hours a day and came home to stiff drinks. Perhaps it's because of the times we live in that both parents have to work just to get by, the kids get less attention and everybody has to use cell-phones just to be able to interact with their family members. If that's the case, we, as Americans in general, need to find a way to get back to "The American Way of Life." Before technology took over and stole our lives.


Funny, I thought I already was, being the SAH parent while he works a job he genuinely likes and brings in enough to support the fam without a second job needed. Being able to keep in touch while he runs a department 12 hours a day (3 days one week, 4 the next, it's a great schedule) is just gravy.

Maybe you need to get it through your head that different companies operate differently, and there are payoffs to their methods in some cases. My husband's company is pulling a solid profit & hand all employees both small Christmas and sizable annual bonuses as standard practice, I don't think they give a s# what you think about their on-the-clock cell use policy.


Evidently, you either didn't read what I said or just ignored it. I fail to see how working 36 hours one week and 48 hours the next week is better than a straight 40 hours for every week. My dad worked 40 hours a week and was able to support our whole family. And he didn't need a cell-phone to "boost his morale." He worked the whole 40 hours and didn't have to slough off to phone home constantly.

And I'll thank you to not curse at me. I don't appreciate filthy language.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 11:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah
if people can keep connected to their significant others/families while working.

But, most people didn't feel the need to be "connected" all the time while at home or away from home. When and why did this change?


I find it interesting and atypical that nobody is responding to my last question.

My hubs works a 12 hour** overnight shift, and most of the coworkers are Boomers & older. Perhaps the answer to your question lies in the realization that they're away from home half the day or longer and keeping in real-time contact when able throughout the night, not just at a scheduled break, is a legit boost to morale.

Gone are the days of dad working at the factory 16 hours a day and not giving a s# about anything & sequestering himself away with a cigar and a stiff drink when he gets home.


When were those days? My dad worked 8 hours a day in the 1960s and 1970s, like all the other dads, and mothers didn't have to work at all. I didn't know anybody's dad who worked 16 hours a day and came home to stiff drinks. Perhaps it's because of the times we live in that both parents have to work just to get by, the kids get less attention and everybody has to use cell-phones just to be able to interact with their family members. If that's the case, we, as Americans in general, need to find a way to get back to "The American Way of Life." Before technology took over and stole our lives.


Funny, I thought I already was, being the SAH parent while he works a job he genuinely likes and brings in enough to support the fam without a second job needed. Being able to keep in touch while he runs a department 12 hours a day (3 days one week, 4 the next, it's a great schedule) is just gravy.

Maybe you need to get it through your head that different companies operate differently, and there are payoffs to their methods in some cases. My husband's company is pulling a solid profit & hand all employees both small Christmas and sizable annual bonuses as standard practice, I don't think they give a s# what you think about their on-the-clock cell use policy.


Evidently, you either didn't read what I said or just ignored it. I fail to see how working 36 hours one week and 48 hours the next week is better than a straight 40 hours for every week. My dad worked 40 hours a week and was able to support our whole family. And he didn't need a cell-phone to "boost his morale." He worked the whole 40 hours and didn't have to slough off to phone home constantly.

And I'll thank you to not curse at me. I don't appreciate filthy language.


I'm sorry to interrupt this one conversation, i just one to point something out ok?

Not all works are the same, lets say for example your father would have been a military guy and he was away most of the time, you know, out there in other country fighting in Iraq or whatever, and then he had to phone home or at least send a message saying "hey kid how are you? I may be back home next summer, take care and reply as soon as you can, sweet dreams"

Is that a bad use of technology? When you are out there on who knows how f*ckd up place you were sent to and having a very very bad time? Would you not just feel like reaching out a bit to your family to get a bit of support and keep going?

Maybe he should have waited for 6 months or whatever and then go home and say "Hey you know what kids! I killed like 40 people this past months, and now i'm crazy because i had no one to talk with every single day but other people like me who also had to kill people every single day!"

I don't get you at all, you are very inflexible, in a way i don't understand. Not all jobs are the same, not all lives are the same! Things changed, why are you even using the internet? Write a letter instead, then ask someone to post it then wait until people reply and then wait for each reply you send back for weeks until you get a full conversation going on by snail mail. Or even better, go back to using smoke signals or send someone running with your mail.

When does it stop? I don't know what you want really, for people to stop using tech and go back to walk a hundred miles to see someone they miss a lot? Where's the line between the "good past" and the "good present".

Why don't you just enjoy your current time and get the best out of it? Nothing will change, anyways

You are wasting very precious time wondering about why it is not what you expected, and it will never be, trust me. Instead of going and let things go and just enjoy yourself? I don't get it i'm sorry

Like i said before, my mom is the only parent i have other than a few friends, i can't really talk to her much, he lives very far away and using whatsapp is the only way i can reach her sometimes. So i do that, get the best out of it

This conversation turned from "why people send too many texts instead of one or two" into "why people use technology!"
edit on 2-11-2018 by BoneSay because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2018 @ 06:04 AM
link   

originally posted by: BoneSay

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: TrulyColorBlind

originally posted by: Nyiah
if people can keep connected to their significant others/families while working.

But, most people didn't feel the need to be "connected" all the time while at home or away from home. When and why did this change?


I find it interesting and atypical that nobody is responding to my last question.

My hubs works a 12 hour** overnight shift, and most of the coworkers are Boomers & older. Perhaps the answer to your question lies in the realization that they're away from home half the day or longer and keeping in real-time contact when able throughout the night, not just at a scheduled break, is a legit boost to morale.

Gone are the days of dad working at the factory 16 hours a day and not giving a s# about anything & sequestering himself away with a cigar and a stiff drink when he gets home.


When were those days? My dad worked 8 hours a day in the 1960s and 1970s, like all the other dads, and mothers didn't have to work at all. I didn't know anybody's dad who worked 16 hours a day and came home to stiff drinks. Perhaps it's because of the times we live in that both parents have to work just to get by, the kids get less attention and everybody has to use cell-phones just to be able to interact with their family members. If that's the case, we, as Americans in general, need to find a way to get back to "The American Way of Life." Before technology took over and stole our lives.


Funny, I thought I already was, being the SAH parent while he works a job he genuinely likes and brings in enough to support the fam without a second job needed. Being able to keep in touch while he runs a department 12 hours a day (3 days one week, 4 the next, it's a great schedule) is just gravy.

Maybe you need to get it through your head that different companies operate differently, and there are payoffs to their methods in some cases. My husband's company is pulling a solid profit & hand all employees both small Christmas and sizable annual bonuses as standard practice, I don't think they give a s# what you think about their on-the-clock cell use policy.


Evidently, you either didn't read what I said or just ignored it. I fail to see how working 36 hours one week and 48 hours the next week is better than a straight 40 hours for every week. My dad worked 40 hours a week and was able to support our whole family. And he didn't need a cell-phone to "boost his morale." He worked the whole 40 hours and didn't have to slough off to phone home constantly.

And I'll thank you to not curse at me. I don't appreciate filthy language.


This conversation turned from "why people send too many texts instead of one or two"


You're right, I apologise.



posted on Nov, 6 2018 @ 02:13 PM
link   
a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Because nobody likes reading a wall. The separate texts provide a break in the conversation.



new topics




 
5
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join