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Lion Air 737 Max 8 fatal crash

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posted on Nov, 7 2018 @ 09:31 PM
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Proof that Boeing is wrong, claiming that Lion Air flight JT610 was caused by Angle of Attack sensors:



PK-LQP had Angle of Attack sensors replaced after last roller coaster flight

Since the same Boeing 737MAX aircraft suffered four previous roller coaster flights and had Angle of Attack sensors replaced with brand new sensors before the crash of flight JT610, Boeing is lying. There was no fault with AoA sensors.





posted on Nov, 7 2018 @ 09:34 PM
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Real cause of JT610 crash was faulty airspeed data commanded spoiler deployment during climb:




posted on Nov, 7 2018 @ 09:38 PM
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If you think spoilers automatically deploy as the result of high (or low)airspeed, I'm not sure what to tell you.



posted on Nov, 7 2018 @ 09:48 PM
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Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee investigators looking at the crash of Lion Air Flight JT610 have found that one of the brand new plane's "angle of attack" sensors had malfunctioned and provided inaccurate data, according to Boeing.

www.nbcnews.com...


A crucial sensor was replaced on a Lion Air jet the day before it plunged into the Java Sea, and that sensor replacement may have exacerbated other problems with the plane, Indonesian investigators said Wednesday.

www.msn.com...
edit on 11/7/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2018 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

The Max has three AoA sensors. The computer is supposed to use data from the other two if one fails, but for some reason in this case it didn't. They're looking at software relating to the sensors.



posted on Nov, 7 2018 @ 11:15 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I wondered if there were three for failure detection. Three would give the ability to detect and recover if one failed. If two fail alike, might not be good. Might point to something new in this configuration.

Hopefully something is found and it doens't become a "it probably won't happen again" situation.



posted on Nov, 7 2018 @ 11:28 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

The current theory is it's something specific to this aircraft, since there haven't been reports of it happening to other airlines. But there's still a long way to go in the investigation, so they won't know for sure for awhile yet.



posted on Nov, 8 2018 @ 05:03 AM
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Another Lion Air plane managed to hit a lamp post last night and damage the wing.



posted on Nov, 8 2018 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yes, that is logical. Wouldn't be surprised if it was inadvertent and therefore hard to trace.



posted on Nov, 8 2018 @ 10:13 AM
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Downloaded information from the recovered flight data recorder found that there was a "different [reading] on the angle-of-attack indicator" during a Denpasar-Jakarta flight on 28 October.



It adds that this was related to the faulty airspeed indication, which was first raised at a 5 November press conference by NTSC chief Soerjanto Tjahjono.

After the replacement, however, pilots that flew a Denpasar-Jakarta flight still found a 20° difference on the left-hand angle-of-attack sensor. During this flight, the pilots implemented "a number of procedures" to rectify the issues, and the jet subsequently landed in Jakarta safely.

www.flightglobal.com...



posted on Nov, 8 2018 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: Woody510



It was under direction of ground crew at the time.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 07:40 PM
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Soerjanto Tjahjono, the head of the safety agency, said during a Wednesday briefing that it was not clear if there was a systemic problem with this type of aircraft.

“We cannot yet say that there is a design flaw with the plane,” he said, adding that the Max 8 appeared to have developed a problem with the angle of attack sensor only after technicians had changed it the day before the doomed flight.

www.nytimes.com...



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: Woody510
Another Lion Air plane managed to hit a lamp post last night and damage the wing.


Probably the spoiler deployment bug again...



posted on Nov, 13 2018 @ 08:52 AM
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The Max FCOM does not reference the MCAS system. It also doesn't reference it in the section detailing differences between the NG and Max. The Max is the first 737 to have MCAS installed. It apparently is shown in the emergency checklist, but that's all.

m.aviationweek.com...
edit on 11/13/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 13 2018 @ 11:42 AM
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A lot of confusion and anger over the MCAS now. One pilot said he's flown the Max "a couple times a month for almost a year" and had no idea it existed. He wants to know what else Boeing didn't tell them about. Another said his transition from NG to the Max consisted of an hour or so with an iPad.

Seattle Times
edit on 11/13/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 13 2018 @ 03:54 PM
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Dead link

Boeing training or Airline training breakdown?You would think pilots would talk about this stuff.Time to stake out PPrune? reply to: Zaphod58



posted on Nov, 13 2018 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

Fixed it.

Ultimately Boeing training. You can't train for systems that got don't know are on the aircraft.



posted on Nov, 13 2018 @ 08:52 PM
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Sobering reading..



posted on Nov, 13 2018 @ 11:48 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

Yeah it is. I wouldn't be surprised to see some kind of backlash against Boeing over it.



posted on Nov, 15 2018 @ 03:01 PM
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Investigators have yet to recover the CVR but expect the preliminary report to be out the 28th or 29th.



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