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The Pyramids Of Egypt: Relics Of An Advanced Prehistoric Civilization?

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posted on Nov, 10 2018 @ 01:25 AM
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"Relics". Of a bunch of ancient "educated" idiots, that figured out how to stack stones, to make a pyramid.

So the "future",.. "Educated" idiots, could look back? Then ask? How did the uneducated idiots of "then", know how to make a pyramid?

It's a F'n pyramid! One of the simplest ways to stack stones. A, "stone age" material. It is not rocket "science".




posted on Nov, 10 2018 @ 06:07 AM
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originally posted by: Cauliflower
a reply to: Harte

They would have found an optimum tooth pattern by trial and error fairly quickly with the crew size they had to experiment with different designs.

hiddenincatours.com...


The didn't use saw teeth to cut the stone (though they did this with wood.)
They used an abrasive. The tube merely applied the pressure and motion to the abrasive.

Harte



posted on Nov, 10 2018 @ 06:22 AM
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a reply to: murphy22



Although. The effort that went into building them is impressive.



posted on Nov, 10 2018 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: blackcrowe
a reply to: murphy22



Although. The effort that went into building them is impressive.





Definitely impressive

Nearly on par with the much greater effort to built the various Chinese Great walls, the Great Canal and the Roman network of roads.



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 07:02 AM
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a reply to: Hanslune




Definitely impressive Nearly on par with the much greater effort to built the various Chinese Great walls, the Great Canal and the Roman network of roads.


Although they were for different reasons than the pyramids.

I agree.




posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 07:41 PM
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It looks like another method of cutting granite is to use hot water (if I'm reading this right)?

This guy apparently has a background in industrial sawing and chemistry, and proposed that chemistry was used to weaken the granite.

vixra.org...

He gives a very technical listing of points:

" Quartz can be highly reactive relative to other constituent minerals4b
; in fact, at pH's above 10,
the rate of dissolution of quartz is several orders of magnitude greater than that of kaolinite (a
clay), and greater than that of diopside (a MgCa silicate), forsterite (a Mg silicate), and
feldspars [anorthite (CaAl silicate), and albite (NaAl silicate)]4c (Fig 5.1, p152)
 Quartz dissolution rate is ~3-orders of magnitude greater at pH 12 than pH 64b (Fig 2.1, p22)
 Quartz dissolution rate is over 2-orders greater at 70°C than at 25°C
4b (Fig 2.1, p22)
 Quartz dissolution rate can be increased ~5x with NaCl (sea salt) 4b (Fig 6.9, p138)
"

Quartz is only part of granite, but if you weaken that component you weaken the whole rock.

The reason he proposed this is because the "feed rate" of the drill is proposterously good. Meaning the drill appears to be gaining too much depth per each spin. Where the normal method of spinning a cylinder in an abrasive should require quite a lot of spins per cm of cutting.

www.theglobaleducationproject.org...


I decided to google his claim about hotter temperatures making granite weaker, and got this:

www.quartzpage.de...

"At temperatures above 100°C and high pressures the solubility of quartz increases quickly. At 300°C it is between 700 and 1200 mg/l, depending on the pressure."

According to the paper, at room temperature the "solubility" is between 6 mg/l and 39 mg/l depending on what kind of quartz. It also mentions that quartz trapped in granite is particularly susceptible to this effect.




It dissolves into a very weak acid, which returns to being quartz again as soon as the water cools, I guess? (I'm not super good at chemistry, so I'm reading into this as accurately as I can.....)

I don't know what a high solubility is, but it seems to me like if you go from 39 mg/l to 700 or 1200 mg/l, that must be a pretty high solubility. Causing the quartz to liquify (into the very weak acid) and probably makes it easier to cut.

But basically it looks like that's about all you need: hot water. Very hot water. Like maybe you boil it on a very hot flame?


edit on 11-11-2018 by bloodymarvelous because: clearer wording



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: bloodymarvelous

At sea level, water cannot get any hotter than 100º C. To get it hotter than that a pressure vessel is required.

edit on 11/11/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 07:51 PM
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Looks like wiki has the melting point of copper at 1084 C. So it's at least feasible for a copper age empire to make a pressure vessel that can stand 300 C.

The only question is: where do they get the idea to do it?


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 07:53 PM
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a reply to: bloodymarvelous


And withstand a pressure of 85 bar, 1200 psi.
edit on 11/11/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 08:10 PM
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a reply to: ALSTA I apologize that i dont have a link, but i heard an explanation on the discovery channel that it is actually water being sucked up from the water table into the sandstone as it acts like a sponge. Then something in the water causes the limestone to break down and flake away. So you are partially right it is water damage but it is not from being submerged.



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 08:11 PM
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Also I did some more reading on super heated water. Apparently super heated water becomes a solvent for a lot of other materials as well. And so if they could superheat it, they would probably do lots of other cool things we haven't seen them do.

en.wikipedia.org...

This might turn out to be a dead end...



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 08:14 PM
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Or......... what if they headed the granite, and then poured the water on it while it was hot?

There is good reason to doubt they did this, since the quartz doesn't have smoke marks on it from being near a fire. I'm just curious if it would work?



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: Phage

There's that pesky ultra high pressure, one paper I just read was talking pressures of 1000 atmospheres to achieve dissolution a 300℃ water.



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 08:19 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

That seems extreme.
The vapor pressure of water at 300º is about 85 atmospheres.
edit on 11/11/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 08:36 PM
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a reply to: Phage


Saturated silica solutions in equilibrium with quartz were obtained in a few days at temperatures above 100°C. Equilibrium is shown by reproducible results for runs of different durations and by the precipitation of quartz from initially supersaturated solutions. The differential heat of solution derived from the data obtained at 1000 atm pressure is 5.38 kcal/mole.

www.sciencedirect.com...



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

So, it requires additional pressure. A big ol' pump. And a hella tough pressure vessel big enough to hold the sample.


Probably not the method used in Egypt.

edit on 11/11/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 08:57 PM
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a reply to: Phage
Probably not the way anybody would use to work granite



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 09:34 PM
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I'm having a hard time finding any other way they could have dissolved it. Short of stuff like hydroflouric acid or bleach, which they probably didn't have access to.

I guess the feed rate issue goes unresolved for now? (Number of spins of the drill per cm of cutting)

If the feed rate was as extreme as this article is claiming, then liquefying the granite seems like the only way it could be done. A normal lapidary process of using a tube drill and abrasive would probably have a lower feed rate.


www.theglobaleducationproject.org...

"1. A taper on both the hole and the core.

2. A symmetrical helical groove following these tapers which showed that the drill advanced into the granite at a feed rate of .100 inch per revolution of the drill.

3. The confounding fact that the spiral groove cut deeper through the quartz than through the softer feldspar. In conventional machining the reverse would be the case.

Mr. Donald Rahn of Rahn Granite Surface Plate Co., Dayton, Ohio, told me, in 1983, that in drilling granite, diamond drills, rotating at 900 revolutions per minute, penetrate at the rate of 1 inch in 5 minutes. This works out to be .0002 inch per revolution, meaning that the ancient Egyptians were able to cut their granite with a feed rate that was 500 times greater.
'



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 09:37 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Yea.
Except for producing an artsy sort of finish. Maybe.

But it would take a pretty impressive set of machinery.



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 09:38 PM
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Perhaps they could get hydrochloric acid from human vomit?

en.wikipedia.org...




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