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NASA Finds Perfectly Rectangular Iceberg In Antarctica As If It Was Deliberately Cut

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posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 07:50 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: CaliMayh3m

Aeronautics means having to do flying things in the atmosphere, yes. Airplanes, but you can look down from airplanes. And satellites.
But part of NASA's mission is the observation and of monitoring of Earth's climates.
earthobservatory.nasa.gov...


NASA also has released an API called World Wind that allows you to use (their) data to visualize it on a virtual globe, including climate and terrain.

WorldWind is a free, open source API for a virtual globe. WorldWind allows developers to quickly and easily create interactive visualizations of 3D globe, map and geographical information. Organizations around the world use WorldWind to monitor weather patterns, visualize cities and terrain, track vehicle movement, analyze geospatial data and educate humanity about the Earth.

You can find out more: HERE
Download Windows version: HERE

It's a bit like Google Earth but geekier!
edit on 10232018 by seattlerat because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 08:11 PM
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originally posted by: mangust69
i it terrao.livejournal.com... read in 2008


Thanks. Here is the video from that link, showing rectangular icebergs breaking off of the Wilkins Ice Shelf, circa 2008.



Seemingly similar rectangular icebergs, but how could anyone 'know' that it is not natural?
Same way that some claim to 'know' that it is in fact natural?
Because some supposed authority said so?

Anywho: wonder if they were tracked, and what they look like as they melt, over time?



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: Nothin

They're studied quite a lot. Apparently.

Iceberg evolution
edit on 10/23/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 08:49 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Nothin

They're studied quite a lot. Apparently.

Iceberg evolution


Thanks. (Click on "view HTML", to see article).

Here is the abstract from the article:

The drift of eight tabular icebergs is discussed. In spite of large differences in the vertical dimension, the various icebergs seem to react in a similar manner to wind effects in areas covered with sea ice. Measurements indicate that it takes between one and five years for an iceberg to move into the westerlies from the coastal areas between about 50°E. and the Antarctic Peninsula. The drift of the icebergs reflects the integrated current effects in the upper 200-300 m, and may thus also give information about the transport of water masses.


Also found a link on that site, to these guys:

International Glaciological Society

Their blurb:

The International Glaciological Society was founded in 1936 to provide a focus for individuals interested in practical and scientific aspects of snow and ice.



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 10:03 PM
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originally posted by: SlowNail
a reply to: MteWamp

I'll level with you. I only heard of it recently, on a kooky little AA style documentary on UKTV Play, called "World War Weird". Worth a look, bud.

It was one of the topics that stuck with me.

Going by their account, it would have worked too. They would have been huge, unsinkable, cheap and easy to maintain. To see one of those ghostly behemoths approach would have been terrifying indeed.

Seriously though, check out the doc. Really interesting. Some pretty creepy stuff was going on.


I will. Thank you.

I keep thinking, if they were gonna use them as aircraft carriers, how many Zambonis would the U.S. Navy need to keep the flight decks smooth and working?



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 12:27 AM
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a reply to: seattlerat

Nature is capable of creating landscapes that appear...well unnatural.

Here is a photo of the giants causeway in Ireland



No aliens or government projects required, sometimes mother nature likes to screw with us.



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 03:15 AM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy
Space laser practice.

Yep... though, one question remains: Russian or Chinese? (obviously not U.S. since we'd never even hear about it... like we haven't so far)

Just a decade ago, I would've said Russian. But these days the Chinese are being given a big technological push by some halfwits, so they definitely present a much bigger threat. And it's always better to err on the safe side, so I wouldn't dismiss those concerns about Chinese cyber-enhanced foot soldiers, either.

Actually, if there is a single example in history, that one can draw conclusions from, it would be the example Nazi Germany in the 1936-1941 period -- an absolutely staggering extent of technological innovation and military expansion, combined with soldier 'enhancements' (pure chemical -- crystal meth -- in the Nazi case, both chemical/genetic and cyber/technological in the Chinese case)... which shouldn't come as any surprise, considering the same halfwit influence behind both.

And, just like in the case of crystal meth-'enhanced' Nazi soldiers, the long-term effects of Chinese 'enhancements' of their soldiers will be equally debilitating. As a matter of fact, I bet the Chinese will utilize the same blitzkrieg approach that Nazis had used, since none of their (Chinese) soldiers will have life expectancy longer than 6 months... which is an overly-optimistic estimate, but, again, it's better to err on the safe side. Personally, I'm expecting no more than 1 month before Chinese soldiers start having 'technical difficulties' with their 'enhancements', and begin suffering mental breakdowns right in the middle of the battle zone (with surprisingly high number of casualties from 'friendly fire' and outright psychotic rampages directed against their own officer cadre).

In short, Chinese may be in the midst of the largest war preparations (against U.S.) in the history of the world, but the only thing one has to really worry about is how to bear the brunt of the initial Chinese strike. Not even a month into the war, the whole Chinese campaign is going to start collapsing all by itself... and neither Chinese military, nor Chinese government, nor Chinese population in general, will ever be the same again... if any of them are even left alive after all is said and done.

... which will leave the forementioned halfwits completely exposed and vulnerable to counterattack... so people should prepare for that moment, first and above all.



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 04:34 AM
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a reply to: MteWamp

I'm not familiar with the science or requirements involved in a process like that. But I imagine some kind of system could have been worked out to save on machinery.

Maybe tracks carved into the ice or some kind of water jet system to replenish the top layer somehow?



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 07:32 AM
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a reply to: Butterfinger




Sounds like a super villain plot!


Anyone seen Elon Musk recently …??



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 09:19 AM
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This would be news if it actually was perfectly rectangular. It's not. Still cool looking.



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 10:48 AM
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originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: Tarzan the apeman.
a reply to: seattlerat

I saw the picture and thought of this.




Every time that happens to me, which is quite often, the cat jumps on top of the pile and messes it all up.


At least your cat doesn't treat your clothing pile as a litter box or marks its territory on your clothes...that smell is the worst!!!



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 10:51 AM
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originally posted by: Nothin

Because some supposed authority said so?



N = Never
A = A
S = Straight
A = Answer



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: Skywatcher2011

originally posted by: Nothin

Because some supposed authority said so?



N = Never
A = A
S = Straight
A = Answer

Good one.
You make it up?



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 08:23 PM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: frugal




BS. Nature doesn't make square anything.


Pyrite crystals don't care what you believe.



Salt crystals feel the same.


Ice crystals do not..however.



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 08:27 PM
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It's a piece of a glacier, not an ice crystal.

Another view of the "perfect' rectangle (peeking from behind the engine), and another.



'I was actually more interested in capturing the A68 iceberg that we were about to fly over, but I thought this rectangular iceberg was visually interesting and fairly photogenic, so on a lark, I just took a couple photos,' Harbeck said.

www.dailymail.co.uk...

There's some video.




edit on 10/24/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 25 2018 @ 05:25 AM
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a reply to: Phage

yeah i saw a tweet from NASA Goddard images earlier today


That time Jeremy Harbeck, a sea ice scientist with NASA's Operation IceBridge, snapped photos of an unusually angular iceberg floating amid sea ice ... and now I can't stop thinking about cake: t.co... pic.twitter.com/AgIROPRw8G— NASA Goddard Images (@NASAGoddardPix) October 24, 2018



posted on Oct, 25 2018 @ 06:01 AM
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a reply to: Skywatcher2011

I see what you did there. Absolutely hilarious. My sides!

Have you ever looked on NASA's website? You will find plenty of straight answers there.



posted on Oct, 25 2018 @ 06:32 AM
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a reply to: Phage

So, it's not "perfectly rectangular" at all.



posted on Oct, 25 2018 @ 03:01 PM
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originally posted by: Phage

originally posted by: Skywatcher2011

originally posted by: Nothin

Because some supposed authority said so?



N = Never
A = A
S = Straight
A = Answer

Good one.
You make it up?
Why should I give you a straight answer, Phage? haha



posted on Oct, 25 2018 @ 03:03 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
It's a piece of a glacier, not an ice crystal.

Another view of the "perfect' rectangle (peeking from behind the engine), and another.



'I was actually more interested in capturing the A68 iceberg that we were about to fly over, but I thought this rectangular iceberg was visually interesting and fairly photogenic, so on a lark, I just took a couple photos,' Harbeck said.

www.dailymail.co.uk...

There's some video.





I dunno Phage...those are still some amazingly large, almost perfectly shaped poptarts.....




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