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What would happen if a super black hole collided with a super black hole of antimatter?

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posted on Oct, 17 2018 @ 06:10 PM
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Q: What would happen if a supermassive black hole collided with a supermassive black hole of antimatter?

Guess: Another BIG BANG?

Maybe the universe is just conserving the energy for ages?

Many would say it turns into light, but im sure as hell no one knows.
And if it turns into light... there is your "dark energy".

What if light (electromagnetism) is dark energy. Consider there is a more than a billion stars in our galaxy alone. The light alone, would push things away? But our local supermassive black hole keeps everything in place. We all know that gravity is very weak, and at those distances (galaxies), the gravity would have almost zero effect. How about the electromagnetism ?

Put a mill in a vacuum, and light will make it spin, ergo it pushes. Even NASA proposed something similar
www.youtube.com...


edit on 17/10/2018 by kloejen because: dark matter... i meant dark energy, sry

edit on 17/10/2018 by kloejen because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 17 2018 @ 06:39 PM
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a reply to: kloejen

0+0=0 nothing happens, except for a dance



posted on Oct, 17 2018 @ 06:45 PM
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The chicken would come first obviously.



posted on Oct, 17 2018 @ 06:48 PM
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Or it would make the sound of one hand clapping.



posted on Oct, 17 2018 @ 06:51 PM
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a reply to: kloejen


Ever blow up a balloon then let go before you tied it off?

BH + antimatterBH = *zipping around, bouncing into other universes like a drunken square dancer*

You get pure energy but no where to put it. Or, if it stays in this universe, double the size of the regular BH.

In reality, you are asking a quantum question about things we know little about!

Real answer: All possible outcomes at once!



posted on Oct, 17 2018 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: kloejen

I thought u-tube was not working...


phys.org - What if a black hole met an antimatter black hole?

There ya go! "Double in size" looks like the winner.

Although Buddha Laughing is also quite acceptable! Or, "space-time jiggling like a bowl full of jelly"!




posted on Oct, 17 2018 @ 07:02 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

So i win a BH ?

Seeming this is turning into a global joke... well, just forget i asked!



posted on Oct, 17 2018 @ 07:03 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Thanks for 2nd answer... will check it out.



posted on Oct, 17 2018 @ 07:09 PM
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a reply to: kloejen

Just ignore and forgive me, kloejen. I wasn't smart enough to play so I took the clown route. I'm only slightly funnier than I am clueless.



posted on Oct, 17 2018 @ 10:42 PM
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originally posted by: kloejen
Q: What would happen if a supermassive black hole collided with a supermassive black hole of antimatter?



originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
phys.org - What if a black hole met an antimatter black hole?


It's not clear that black holes can be composed of either matter or anti-matter as we know it. We can say that matter or anti-matter went into the black hole, but once inside the event horizon, the laws of physics as we know them break down so we can't say what form the mass has other than to say it's more dense than the forms of matter and anti-matter we are familiar with, even more dense than a neutron star. One possibility is that the mass inside a black hole does not come from any sort of matter at all, but is a form of energy. This is not so unthinkable when you realize that about 99% of your own mass comes from energy, so why couldn't that be 100% inside a black hole?

So if the black hole is say some kind of highly dense form of energy inside, it's possible that it can't be classified as either matter or anti-matter. Even if that's the case, the answer in the link that combining two black holes gives you a bigger black hole would remain true whether they are made out of matter, energy, or whatever. According to the physics we think we do know they would combine their masses in any case. But we just don't have physics to describe the state of matter or energy inside a black hole, though we know it's too dense to be made of the types of baryonic matter or anti-matter we are familiar with.

What is a black hole made of?

The simple answer is that we don’t know. A black hole is defined as a region of spacetime from which extremely strong gravity prevents anything, including light, from escaping.

We know that matter falling into black holes is no different from the matter which can be found lurking around the rest of the Universe. However, the closer we get to the centre of a black hole, the faster our understanding of physics breaks down. Thanks to General Relativity, we think we understand what happens in this extreme gravity and with the help of Quantum Mechanics, we can make an intelligent estimate as to what happens at smaller, microscopic scales. But if the two theories are combined – like they would be at the centre of a black hole – they break down, leaving us with no idea as to what’s going on!

To get around the problem, astrophysicists need a theory of gravity that is compatible with Quantum Mechanics that might just describe the physics inside a black hole. At the moment though, no such model exists but physicists are working on it.


In addition to forming a larger black hole, the merger would likely distort space-time so if the black holes were massive enough and not too far away we might detect gravitational waves from the merger. By Super Black hole I guess you mean supermassive, in which case the supermassive black holes at the center of the Milky way and Andromeda galaxies are expected to merge in some billions of years. Unfortunately the Earth will no longer be able to support life then or may not even exist, but if humans have colonized elsewhere and set up a gravitational wave detector, I imagine the results of that merger will be spectacular, because the mass of the milky way's black hole is already huge at 4.1 million solar masses, but the mass of Andromeda's black hole is thought to be at least 110 million solar masses and perhaps even twice that.

edit on 20181017 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Oct, 18 2018 @ 02:04 AM
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I'd say in a black hole it no longer matters if it's matter or anti-matter. All that mass has been compacted into singularity - an infinitely small but infinitely dense point, so the usual rules of physics no longer apply.

I'd say such a merger would be just like any other black hole merger, resulting in a single black hole with combined mass of the two.



posted on Oct, 18 2018 @ 03:14 AM
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a reply to: kloejen

It doesn't matter for us as external observers. Due to time dilation the actual merge would take infinite time. And the infinite red shift makes it impossible to see. We will never observe what happens when whatever the black holes consist of merges.

What we can observe are the gravitational waves of the black holes getting closer to each other.



posted on Oct, 18 2018 @ 04:43 AM
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a reply to: kloejen

Thank you for posting this, it is an educational and interesting question indeed.

I wish someone would address the matter of light as dark energy. When we look in the sky we only think of the tiny stream of photons leading from the star to our eye, but each one of those dots is radiating photons in all directions, meaning the entire universe is absolutely filled "to the brim" with photons!
edit on 10/18/2018 by 3n19m470 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2018 @ 04:47 AM
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I don't know enough to offer an answer.

Prof Stephan Hawking's final paper has just been released.

https ://www.space.com/42141-stephen-hawking-final-paper-published.html?utm_source=sdc-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20181017-sdc

arxiv.org...


edit on 18-10-2018 by blackcrowe because: fix link



posted on Oct, 18 2018 @ 04:59 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Very nice explanation Though I would add this as well. Energy is energy and would not change because everything in a blackhole would be broken down to its most basic parts.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Oct, 18 2018 @ 05:07 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Thank you for your interesting input.

a reply to: blackcrowe

Thank you for the link to Stephen Hawking's paper. Will be a interesting read.




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