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NO ERUPTION' at Mount St. Helens but dust and ash, warning says

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posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 11:54 AM
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NO ERUPTION' at Mount St. Helens but dust and ash, warning says


Strong winds kicked up dust and ash on Mount St. Helens Sunday, prompting the National Weather Service to try to calm the masses.

"There has been NO ERUPTION," the service tweeted.

Mount St. Helens famously blew its top nearly forty years ago, killing 57, destroying more than 200 homes, forever changing the surrounding landscape.

Regardless? With all the EQ action in the are? MANY believe it's time again for this Big Girl to blow her top.
Locals, yes, but still.

Mount St. Helens, an active volcano, had four times as many earthquakes than usual last month

Sure, this was last January, nearing a year ago - but, isn't it all 'just a matter of time'?

peace




posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 11:58 AM
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Mmmmm.... Doom porny.



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 12:06 PM
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Oops wrong thread .
edit on 15-10-2018 by Fallingdown because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: silo13
MANY believe it's time again for this Big Girl to blow her top.

I'm sorry to nit-pick, but Mt. St. Helens hasn't had a proper "top" for about 40 years.

Locals, yes, but still.

Just what the hell is that supposed to mean?



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: silo13

Sure, this was last January, nearing a year ago - but, isn't it all 'just a matter of time'?


Yes, it's just a matter of time, but so what? We know it blows every so often, but last time it did it only killed a few people who were too stupid to get out of the way. It's in a fairly remote spot as far as volcanoes go. The one you really need to worry about, called the most dangerous volcano in America, is

Mount Rainier.



The pic used a telephoto that exaggerates how close it is, but you catch my drift. If it blew west and north it would take out a large swath of heavily populated area.



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 02:16 PM
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originally posted by: DictionaryOfExcuses

originally posted by: silo13
MANY believe it's time again for this Big Girl to blow her top.

I'm sorry to nit-pick, but Mt. St. Helens hasn't had a proper "top" for about 40 years.

Locals, yes, but still.

Just what the hell is that supposed to mean?

Of course it has a top, and a bottom and "locals" I think you can read the sentence again and get the meaning.



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

With Hood in the conversation, too.

Rainier should scare the ever lovin' bejeses out of people if it decides to wake from its nap.



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

Baker would be bad if it decided to blow its top. It’s the only one I can see in the distance at about 23 km away.




....Fortunately, Mount Baker is one of the most monitored and studied volcanoes in the United States due to its accessibility from urban areas and the relatively high level of funding for the US Geological Survey’s volcanology program following the Mount St. Helens eruption.

Two seismometers placed on the volcano by the US Geological Survey create a key early-warning system for an impending eruption, as a swarm of tremors within a short period of time could be a sign that magma is moving upwards.

As a reminder of Mount Baker’s potency, the latest earthquake detected inside the volcano at the time of writing is a magnitude 0.7 tremor, striking at a shallow depth of 0.6 km, at 10:32 pm on Thursday, May 17, 2018....

dailyhive.com...



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: violet

That one, too.

Hood is the one I worry most about, though "worry" is much too strong a word. When St. Helens blew, it went north of me, by about twenty miles or so. I'd be right in the middle of a Mt. Hood plume...I'd just as soon miss that little adventure.



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 02:30 PM
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Is it waking up ?



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 02:30 PM
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a reply to: Meldionne1

Which one?



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: seagull
I missed st .helens erupting in May 1980 because I was on holidays in the uk. There was some light ash that came down on our house in Surrey BC Canada, . I’m now located closer to them in the Fraser Valley. We all see Baker from here. Looks magnificent on a clear day. Has the optical illusion of being much closer than it is, due to its size. It’s the only one I’ve been on, not including some other very dormant ones in the area.

Sooner or later one will blow again.



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 03:54 PM
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Where's pierce Brosnan when you need him?



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 05:14 PM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

It means the locals have all these ways of 'knowing' - local lore, how it 'felt' before the last time, etc but it all doesn't add up to the same sum as the vulcanologists.



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: seagull

You got that right... What a blow that would be - holy smokes!

Scary thought - but, it is what it is.



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 05:27 PM
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There have been indications that Mt. St. Helens is slowly reloading, but she shouldn't be capable of pulling another 1980 for quite a while. With volcanoes one never knows for sure, but they usually don't blow that big quite so frequently.

There is nothing that says she can't have periods of less intense activity along the way though.
edit on 15-10-2018 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 05:41 PM
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Last time one whole side of the mountain blew off. Now, at least, there isn't that side to blow off. Of all the mountains in the range, though, St. Helens is still the most active with Baker second. Rainier hasn't done anything for awhile. Saturday we were driving along River Road (Tacoma to Puyallup) with a beautiful view of Rainer ahead of us. A sign popped up that said, "Volcano evacuation route."

"We're going the wrong way," I said.



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

Sheesh. That's almost as bad as this one, lol...






But in reality...




I understand what you're saying though.



posted on Oct, 15 2018 @ 06:31 PM
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At least mine wasn't Photoshopped! I've seen the geological eruption maps. It probably wouldn't be the lava, but the mud flows (lahars) from the mountain. One leg of the flow would follow the Puyallup River valley and terminate at the Port of Tacoma into Puget Sound. Buckley, Bonney Lake, Sumner, and Puyallup would be toast. Another would flow northward and potentially reach the southern shore of Lake Washington, wiping out Auburn, Kent, Renton and a large amount of Boeing in the Kent Valley. My daughter lives on top of an old lahar from a previous eruption. And, of course, the ash itself could travel much further. I'm thinking I won't worry about it too much, but it is a time bomb.



posted on Oct, 16 2018 @ 04:22 AM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

I don't understand your problem with my response.

This is common parlance - for a volcano to "lose its top", "blow its top", etc. Hence, Mt. St. Helens has not had a "proper top" for almost 40 years. What's more is that in spite of minor venting events, there is no evidence that we should expect anything major from Mt. St. Helens.

"Many believe it's time again for this big girl to blow her top. Locals, yes, but still."

It struck me as implying something like "the locals lack credibility, but still..." In my experience it's not uncommon for people to veil their true meaning in such innocent-sounding turns-of-phrase. And since we're on a public forum, I asked.

Happy trails.




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