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Russian Soyuz Rocket Launch Failure, NASA/Roscosmos crew escape

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posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 04:51 AM
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They survived.


Soyuz rocket carrying astronauts makes emergency landing

Soyuz rocket carrying a NASA astronaut and Russian cosmonaut made an emergency landing Thursday back on Earth after an issue with a booster, NASA said.

"Search and rescue teams are in contact with the crew and are en route to the landing location," NASA said. It's not yet clear where the rocket touched down.

edition.cnn.com...



NASA has not provided much detail about the failure, but confirmed in a tweet that there was a problem with booster separation. Dean later confirmed the anomaly during live commentary. During the live broadcast of the launch, narration from Mission Control suggested that the booster failed to separate from the Soyuz capsule.

www.space.com...




Start at 1:10:50.
edit on 11/10/18 by C0bzz because: (no reason given)

edit on 11/10/18 by C0bzz because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 05:01 AM
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a reply to: C0bzz

Dont see an explosion.

That CGI of the rocket looks like "Gravity".




posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 06:17 AM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
a reply to: C0bzz

Dont see an explosion.

That CGI of the rocket looks like "Gravity".



I think the second stage failed.

spacenews.com...


The launch appeared to be normal until around first stage separation, when the crew reported a “failure” with the booster and feeling weightlessness.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 06:35 AM
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a reply to: moebius

After watching the takeoff numerous times I noticed the rocket wobble slightly right when it takes off. That could very well have affected the decoupling ring and caused that to fail. So to me it seems that caused the issue. Now the next question is what caused that to fail. Launch pad issues? Possibly engineering issues on the decoupled? Or even maybe vibration from the first stage.

My guess is a launch pad issue affecting the decoupler.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 06:39 AM
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a reply to: C0bzz

Well these guys had someone looking out for them.

Happy endings are rare.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 07:43 AM
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a reply to: Allaroundyou

Lots of things wobble, shake, twist, shudder and move during launch. Rockets are far from fragile things, they have to be designed to endure massive torque and vibration.

Having witnessed launches and rocket tests up close and personal I can tell you the liftoff phase of rocket flight is probably the single most violent event the human mind can comprehend! I've witnessed tests from 2 miles away where it seemed like the Apocalypse was taking place. I'm dead serious too. One test we witnessed in Utah was just a single SRB throttle-up to 80% power and it seemed like the world was coming to an end (from inside a 4 foot thick concrete observation bunker 12 feet underground about 2 miles away).

Someone could have detonated a nuclear weapon on top of that bunker and it wouldn't have shaken any worse. The ground shook so violently anything not screwed down fell on the floor, chairs flipped over, people had to hold on to the walls to keep from falling down. My ears rang for a week afterwards and we were wearing double hearing protection, some of the best known to man. The shock wave was like a 110lb jackhammer hammering away on your chest. It literally raised a dust cloud from the vibration alone about two miles in all directions. It was absolutely unbelievable! "Violent" doesn't even begin to describe that experience. There's not even a word for it. It was by many accounts an almost "religious experience". ...and that was just a test!

At an actual launch the sound alone will kill a human being inside a couple mile radius. (not something they publicize either, but launches kill every living creature above ground for over a mile...birds, critters, everything) An actual launch is more than 10x as violent as what we experienced during the test firings.

If I were to surmise what happened it would be that the explosives used to separate the stages failed to detonate fully (or at all).

I'm relieved to hear the astronauts survived. I certainly hope they go buy some lottery tickets, because today was their lucky day! The chances of survival on an aborted launch are about 5% (or less).
edit on 10/11/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 07:48 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I didn’t know that a launch within that certain radius kills animals. And yes they probably should get some lottery tickets.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

The water they dump is more for sound deadening than cooling from what I have read.




posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk


I have always wanted to see a launch but had no idea they were like that.

Here is a famous quote that seems relevant:

John Glenn's Famous Quote



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 08:14 AM
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It's interesting how NASA suppresses information. They do it all the time too. The Russian controllers were talking about failures left and right for fully 5 minutes before NASA said a word about there even being a problem at all, let alone an abort. The Russians were already fully through the turn around maneuver, had already initiated the ballistic descent and were returning to Earth when NASA finally says there is an issue with the booster. Then immediately afterwards the NASA feed cuts out.

I wonder why NASA is so secretive like that?



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 08:24 AM
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originally posted by: C0bzz
They survived.

Fantastic news!
Still, it breaks my heart that America has to hitch-hike into space atop technology they used to laugh at.
The space program used to be a big part of what made America great.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

My inlaws have property in Cocoa Beach, FL. It's about 10-15 miles from the Cape. When they'd launch the Shuttle at the Cape their house would shake, and when the Shuttle got above the trees you'd hear that deafening crackling of the engines as they throttled up. You'd continue to hear it long after the Shuttle disappeared from sight.

A number of years ago my wife and I were on a flight into Orlando during a Shuttle launch. It was overcast that day and we were above the clouds on approach into Orlando when the pilot came on and told the people on the left side to look out the window. Right then the Space Shuttle came rocketing up through the clouds and continued skyward.

Now THAT was cool!
edit on 10/11/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 08:44 AM
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a reply to: JohnnyCanuck

I agree, especially about the Shuttle.

I'm probably biased having worked in the program for as long as I did, but the Space Shuttle is a really, really, bittersweet thing for me. Next to Apollo the Shuttle was one of the crowning achievements of mankind, and it was also one of our greatest defeats (at least for me).

You see (and I've told this story here before), I worked on the STS-51-L program. I walked in the door one morning in January 1986 after finishing a midnight shift and quickly made my way to the living room where the TV was so I could watch the launch. When I got there I saw my roommate sitting on the couch, pale as a ghost. The time was 9:39am.

STS-51-L had just disintegrated not 30 seconds before. January 28, 1986 at 0938L.

...most people knew it as "Challenger".




posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 08:59 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

You must have a lot of cool stories, you could probably create some killer threads about them!


I saw the last space shuttle launch ever - STS-135. Very cool. My video is on youtube but it's not that great. Also I have a cool shirt from the event, and I've been in the viewing area for STS-135 mission control during its mission, the viewing area for the ISS mission control, been inside Apollo mission control, been at the huge swimming pool where they train the astronauts to spacewalk, seen 2 of 3 surviving Saturn V rockets, and been at the site of the tragic Apollo 1 fire. Might be forgetting something. All just as a tourist, at least so far.
edit on 11/10/18 by C0bzz because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 09:00 AM
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a reply to: C0bzz

Been several Soviet/Russian launch failure

Soyuz 18 aka April Anomaly, April 5 1975, 2nd stage failed to separate from 3rd stage triggering abort
Capsule went into suborbital ballistic trajectory . Crew experienced 20 G loads injuring them
Came down in Mongolia close to Chinese border

en.wikipedia.org...

Soyuz T-10 pad abort September 26, 1983 fire occurred in rocket during countdown, escape rocket fired 2 seconds
before rocket exploded on pad, crew recovered several miles away

en.wikipedia.org...

There have been several landing accidents including first flight of Soyuz 1 in April 1967 which crashed on landing killing cosmonaut Vladimir Komorov







edit on 11-10-2018 by firerescue because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: C0bzz

It surprising that these rockets still go into space !

amazing that they survived , I hate it when our rockets explode with astronauts inside , it always sets back public opinion on the safety of space travel



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 09:40 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Sounds like you have been to Thiokol.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 09:58 AM
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Ya know, I think it’s time to bid farewell to the ISS and rebuild the program from the ground up utilizing the modern and futuristic technology. What the ISS has done has been a remarkable chapter in American history. But in its current version, it’s starting to show signs of its age.

Of course it still serves a fantastic purpose, but it serves no purpose that can’t otherwise be done through other means. I would say all the worlds space agencies could count their heads together and develop a new ISS with capabilities that better justify its use. What this capabilities could be, I don’t know.

If we could fine a way to bring the ISS back down to earth in one piece, that would be truly remarkable; deserving to a craft that has been one of the few positive entries in humanities journal of its time on Earth.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 10:05 AM
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a reply to: mzinga

I have.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 10:13 AM
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a reply to: Assassin82

The ISS was never designed to return to Earth. In fact, quite the opposite; by and large it is actually designed so that it can't return to Earth. Not all the way anyway. It will eventually try, but it will burn up on deorbit and reentry.







 
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