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To Soak Beans, or Not Soak Beans...THAT is the question!

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posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 02:31 PM
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Soak the beans for at least hours then make sure to bring the beans to a boil for at least twenty minutes before putting them in a slow cooker. They contain chemistry that will agglutinate your blood which can lead to all sorts of problems if they are not detoxed properly. Also make sure to boil the green beans for at least twenty minutes. You do not need a stroke because you ate something that contains chemistry that turns your blood to jelly.

If properly prepared beans are safe, a small amount of this chemical can be detoxed by our bodies but soak those beans and boil for at least twenty minutes. Slow cooker heat actually increases the creation of this chemical. Once the beans have been detoxed, the chemical is neutralized mostly, way less chance of problems with blood cells and platelets sticking together. Just think of how many people take blood thinners in this country, why do they need them? Because nobody taught them about what I am saying. I did not know this till about eight years ago, now that I know it I have reduced my risk of stroke by a lot. The canning companies do take care of this, bushs beans and canned kidney beans have been neutralized by their process. It is homemade cookers who do not know this that poison themselves and their friends.

There are other foods that stimulate agglutination in everyone, and on top of that, there are blood type specific foods that effect certain blood types. Bean agglutins effect everyone. White beans have less than kidney beans, but if you eat a lot of beans make sure they are prepared right. We do not need members who have strokes or heart attacks or pulminary problems from blood clots.




posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
I don't soak beans, pulses, or anything else.
I may rinse off water and re-boil sometimes but soaking no, never done it.
I think it is a silly myth.



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 02:43 PM
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originally posted by: TNMockingbird
I've soaked beans and not soaked beans, just cooked them straight on. I think my preferred method is quick soak (heat to boiling and let sit with tight fitting lid for an hour or so) then rinse them, followed by slow cooking. I rinse them after the quick soak though because no matter how they are prepared, without rinsing, they taste like dirt to me. Regardless of seasonings and additions like meat, onion and garlic, I still taste dirt if I don't rinse them
I don't recall experiencing the digestive issues, maybe the rinsing helps with that.
I like a slow cook method so that they aren't boiled so hard that the skin comes off or they break apart.


I pretty much follow that procedure myself. I never remember to soak the beans overnight, so I just parboil them before I cook them, then let them rest for an hour or so. I tried cooking some beans once without soaking or parboiling and they tasted horrible. Of course, I'm a pretty pathetic chef anyway...

I also believe that not all farts are created equally. The difference may be due to the gut bacteria present at the time, or it may be how the beans were cooked.

I cooked some beans once that must have really excited my e. coli. I was in a Lowes Home Improvement store and let rip a long duration toxic cloud in the plumbing section of the store, right next to the commode display. A couple of guys walked by and were convinced that somebody had taken a dump in one of the toilets. They were looking into each bowl to find the culprit when they saw me standing there in one of the aisles pretending not to notice them. One of the guys chuckled and whispered to the other one that I must have sh*t myself when I let that sucker loose.


-dex



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

What do I think?

The only thing you need to know is that my grandmother, who was born in 1908, ALWAYS soaked the beans (pintos) overnight.

Case closed!



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: TonyS

we always soak our beans overnight...with a litlle bit of baking soda to take care of the gas problem

I have read that if you eat kombu or wakame with beans it prevent gas...have not personally tried these seaweed has anybody tried them??
edit on 9-10-2018 by research100 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 04:34 PM
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I just had some of the best beans in the world at McGuyers in Pensacola, 18c a bowl. Was great with a Belfast Bomber and the mushroom and steak pie.



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 06:26 PM
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originally posted by: research100
a reply to: TonyS

we always soak our beans overnight...with a litlle bit of baking soda to take care of the gas problem

I have read that if you eat kombu or wakame with beans it prevent gas...have not personally tried these seaweed has anybody tried them??


A little baking soda in them while soaking does seem to work to lower gas. Someone old told me that many years ago and I have added it ever since.



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 09:26 PM
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www.choosingvoluntarysimplicity.com...

Just a little explanation of my original post on this. Soak the beans then boil them before slow cooking. There are lots of articles on this subject, it used to be well known in the old days but evidently parents did not state the reason it had to be done a certain way when they taught their kids to cook.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 10:36 AM
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Rinse them.. soak and stir them. remove the floaters..

It kinda depends on size too. If they're small like a mung bean, I don't see the point of soaking them long. If they're a kidney bean then sure. I think the bottom line is cooking time whether you soak (shorter time) vs. unsoaked (longer time).




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