It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Generator idea

page: 1
7
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:15 PM
link   
So I've been interested in "free energy" for a while. My definition of it is energy from a generator, that does not require I pay an electric bill or use any kind of fuel. Crazy eh? You can make up whatever definition you want for "free energy" but that's what the term means to me. I build the generator, and no longer require fuel or an electric bill.

So here's the idea: A magnetically levitated homopolar disk with magnets attached, N polarity on the edge of the disk, opposing the stator, which is really just a magnetically levitated ring where the inside of the ring is also covered with N polarity. So basically by definition, there isn't really a stator. Just a ring instead. The two objects will repel each other and auto-rotate depending on the precise distance between them and focusing of the magnetic fields with "shells" to focus them....


Spin-stabilized magnetic levitation may be useful but it requires a specific RPM range, and I already have plenty of good ideas for braking/slowing down of the device.

Now these generators normally produce very low voltage but extremely high amperage. They're low friction and low back-emf by nature. I want to exploit these properties.

www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a205452.pdf

Lots of research already on generating a super high voltage pulse out of one of these high amperage disks. If the disk has attached to it a primary winding, rather than brushes to pick up the voltage/current, and a switch is used to repeatedly collapse/disconnect current going to the primary winding, a huge voltage can be generated in the secondary winding.

Problem is, that's great for a pulse, but a pulse cannot charge capacitors or power devices. So I want to use (probably custom) cockcroft-walton voltage multiplier to turn the DC pulses into steady DC, which will require extremely high voltage capacitors and diodes that can withstand the high voltage pulse. So then after the steady DC is created, use it to charge the disk (two disks actually, one negative and the other positive separated by a dielectric) to a very high voltage, which can then be used to supply both the amps and volts to spark gap electrodes, and therefore, it'll use plasma contacts to supply power to a load, from the top of the rotor (positive disk) and the bottom (negative disk). I'm not the first one to think of using plasma contacts of course. Now it'll have to have some kind of quenching mechanism or timer eventually because it'll get super hot with that amount of amperage and voltage. That's easy enough to figure out though.


Above 50KV the biefeld-brown effect can also be used to produce thrust, requiring no static/steady DC at all, so that it becomes self-powering from it's own step-up transformer, and the permanent magnets are no longer the main source of thrust. I have some more advanced ideas in mind using photo-electric and photomagnetic materials but there's no point in messing with that if the basic idea doesn't work first... Eventually something would wear out on this thing of course, even if it works.

Criticisms and comments appreciated...




posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:20 PM
link   
How about putting 4 0r 5 smaller ones in a series to be used with a battery bank?



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:24 PM
link   
How about a few solar panels and forget it. I power my entire cabin with just 6 panels.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:30 PM
link   
a reply to: Anomaly0101

The propelling magnets will lose their charge rapidly.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:31 PM
link   
a reply to: Anomaly0101




Problem is, that's great for a pulse, but a pulse cannot charge capacitors


When you get the basics so damn wrong you need to do some learning before you can do the inventing.

Capacitors are readily charged by pulses, many, many circuits use this very feature to function.

P



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:36 PM
link   
a reply to: pheonix358

LOL, I wasn't going to go there, but yeah, capacitors are basically surge generators. They don't store energy, they store a charge.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:41 PM
link   
a reply to: Vector99




They don't store energy, they store a charge.


You can go right back and redo science 101 ... because you are failing at science too.


P



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:46 PM
link   
a reply to: pheonix358

capacitors dont amplify energy? or they dont store a charge?

Which was wrong?



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:47 PM
link   
If it's that easy, put one together and show us.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Vector99

Do some research yourself rather than wanting it on a bloody plate.




capacitors dont amplify energy? or they dont store a charge? Which was wrong?


Jesus!

P



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:50 PM
link   
a reply to: Quadrivium

That could work but I'm aiming for 50KV pulses at a minimum.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:51 PM
link   
a reply to: Nickn3

Because they suck and they're expensive and charge things slowly in comparison and they support the petroleum industry



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: pheonix358
a reply to: Vector99

Do some research yourself rather than wanting it on a bloody plate.




capacitors dont amplify energy? or they dont store a charge? Which was wrong?


Jesus!

P



seriously?

Now I'm thinking you don't know what one is.

Does a capacitor normally require 3, 4, or 5 wires?



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:54 PM
link   

originally posted by: pheonix358
a reply to: Anomaly0101




Problem is, that's great for a pulse, but a pulse cannot charge capacitors


When you get the basics so damn wrong you need to do some learning before you can do the inventing.

Capacitors are readily charged by pulses, many, many circuits use this very feature to function.

P
Never claimed to have a masters degree in electrical engineering, but I would've imagined they didn't get charged very well by pulses since I've read AC doesn't charge capacitors or batteries efficiently at all, and I was under the impression that DC pulses are too similar to AC. Thanks for pointing that out. And no actually, there is no real need to go to school for this type of stuff or do some learning. Inventing requires minimal knowledge depending on the invention. I appreciate the criticism though. Anything else?



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:56 PM
link   

originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: pheonix358

LOL, I wasn't going to go there, but yeah, capacitors are basically surge generators. They don't store energy, they store a charge.
They do actually store energy. Charge = energy, but it's a much lower capacitance than batteries. So it stores much less energy, although it can be charged and discharged faster than most batteries. Thanks for the replies so far!



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Anomaly0101





And no actually, there is no real need to go to school for this type of stuff or do some learning. Inventing requires minimal knowledge depending on the invention.


Well, you should do very well then.

P

edit on 8/10/2018 by pheonix358 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: Anomaly0101

The propelling magnets will lose their charge rapidly.
Not necessarily, it all depends on a lot of different factors. Temperature for one. Reorientation of magnetic domains is not always an issue with certain kinds of magnets. It's not so much a "charge" that they will lose.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:59 PM
link   
a reply to: Anomaly0101

Technically yes, a capacitor stores energy, however the entire energy of a capacitor is discharged upon energy transfer. In other words, it holds ONE charge, and that is all, unless it is fed a constant supply of energy.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 09:02 PM
link   

originally posted by: Vector99

originally posted by: pheonix358
a reply to: Vector99

Do some research yourself rather than wanting it on a bloody plate.




capacitors dont amplify energy? or they dont store a charge? Which was wrong?


Jesus!

P



seriously?

Now I'm thinking you don't know what one is.

Does a capacitor normally require 3, 4, or 5 wires?

Why do you try to front like you know electronics when you clearly don’t know as much as you think you do based on the car audio thread and now your failing in this one too?


OP- Sorry to shoot ya down but if it was that easy it’d already be done.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 09:07 PM
link   
a reply to: BigDave-AR

Car audio is child's play. Let me know when you have to worry about varying voltages and wire runs more than 10'. You weren't right in that thread btw.




top topics



 
7
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join