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Why is the sky blue?

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posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: CainHarmbank

Because it is Gods Favorite Color ....




posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:34 PM
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Wow. A grown-ass adult had to ask this.

And people wonder why other countries are quite literally running academic circles around us. Somewhere in China, a kindergartner just beat American adults in basic science.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 08:46 PM
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originally posted by: Nyiah
Wow. A grown-ass adult had to ask this.

And people wonder why other countries are quite literally running academic circles around us. Somewhere in China, a kindergartner just beat American adults in basic science.





Ah , So Why is the Sky Blue > ?






Maybe because our atmosphere is more efficient at scattering blue (shorter-wavelength) light than red (longer-wavelength) light , and two thirds of the Earth's Surface is Covered in Water ? Just Guessing
edit on 8-10-2018 by Zanti Misfit because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 11:46 PM
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It is blue because it looks like crap when it is brown.



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 02:20 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Y'know it's weird... I've never seen brown light...



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 02:38 AM
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The sky is blue because it reflects the sea.

The sea is blue because it reflects the sky.



You're welcome.



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 05:31 AM
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posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 05:51 AM
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You don't need to know.

All you need to know is, the sly is blue and there is nothing you can do.



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 07:16 AM
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a reply to: sine.nomine

Put a light inside a brown beer bottle?

Paint a light bulb brown like most coloured party lights?

Surely it is possible? Couldn't any colour technically be able to be a colour of light?

Goddamit now I want to paint a light brown and I have no paint.




posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 07:18 AM
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originally posted by: AtomicKangaroo
a reply to: sine.nomine

Put a light inside a brown beer bottle?

Paint a light bulb brown like most coloured party lights?

Surely it is possible? Couldn't any colour technically be able to be a colour of light?

Goddamit now I want to paint a light brown and I have no paint.



I make all my black lights by painting light bulbs black.

But I think my fluro paint is broken, it doesn't glow.



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 07:23 AM
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a reply to: Allaroundyou

watch what?



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 07:24 AM
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a reply to: Parishna

You just chose the wrong color. You should have used ultra violet. LOL



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 07:25 AM
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a reply to: CainHarmbank


So you know which way is up.
It's this confusion that makes sailors such heavy drinkers, see?



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: CainHarmbank

What is blue? Really? Why do we call photons with a wavelength of 470 nm "blue" and not, say, "oatmeal" or even
"garbonzo"? Anyway, to answer your question and not mine, look up Rayleigh scattering.



posted on Oct, 12 2018 @ 06:06 PM
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originally posted by: Cancerwarrior
a reply to: CainHarmbank

I thought it was because O and Ni are the two most abundant elements in the atmosphere, and closest to blue on the color spectrum.

I could be wrong though, high school was 20+ years ago for me.

I don't know what conspiracies we can come up with the sky being blue though.


I read nitrogen comprises almost 80% of the atmosphere, and oxygen almost 20%.

Oxygen is a blue color but nitrogen is clear.

I estimate oxygen is a great influence on the color of the scattered sunlight.

I also read at a certain altitude, like 60 to 90 miles, there is no nitrogen, but only oxygen.

This seemed to be a puzzling order of things, because nitrogen is lighter in mass than oxygen.

If there is mostly just empty space above us, I wonder, how would oxygen rise higher than nitrogen?



posted on Oct, 12 2018 @ 06:19 PM
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originally posted by: sine.nomine
a reply to: CainHarmbank

From what I remember it had to do with the visible spectrum of light and the density of molecules. Which is why a clear blue sky is visible during the day versus a red or orange sunset. Light has to collide with molecules to be visible on a spectrum of color rather than be brilliant white light. Hope this helps.


I see it more as orange or pink skies, when looking into the horizon just when the sun is about to set or has risen. But looking up at this time of day, the sky is still a darker blue. A certain type of cloud (or smoke) makes for that pretty pink color once in a while.

Cancerwarrior seemed to suggest light being scattered when it hits oxygen is how you get blue.

But what kind of molecule do you think the sunlight is colliding with to make that lovely orange color at sunrise and sunset?



posted on Oct, 12 2018 @ 06:37 PM
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originally posted by: infolurker
a reply to: CainHarmbank

Because it is so easy to look up on google.com

math.ucr.edu...

Why is the sky blue?
A clear cloudless day-time sky is blue because molecules in the air scatter blue light from the sun more than they scatter red light. When we look towards the sun at sunset, we see red and orange colours because the blue light has been scattered out and away from the line of sight.



Uhh... Does that sound like a good answer to you?

Why do I see only blue light like 45 minutes after sunrise, when the sun gets way above the horizon, but I see lots of orange light like 1 minute after sunrise, when the sun is just at the horizon?

Why is the light scattered any differently when the sun is directly in sight at both times?



posted on Oct, 12 2018 @ 06:49 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: CainHarmbank

Why Is the Sky Blue?

There will be a test on Friday and it will count on your grade.


The blue color of the sky is due to Rayleigh scattering. blue skyAs light moves through the atmosphere, most of the longer wavelengths pass straight through. Little of the red, orange and yellow light is affected by the air.

However, much of the shorter wavelength light is absorbed by the gas molecules. The absorbed blue light is then radiated in different directions. It gets scattered all around the sky. Whichever direction you look, some of this scattered blue light reaches you. Since you see the blue light from everywhere overhead, the sky looks blue.

As you look closer to the horizon, the sky appears much paler in color. To reach you, the scattered blue light must pass through more air. Some of it gets scattered away again in other directions. Less blue light reaches your eyes. The color of the sky near the horizon appears paler or white.


Or do you mean why do we call blue, blue?
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blue (adj.1)

"of the color of the clear sky," c. 1300, bleu, blwe, etc., "sky-colored," also "livid, lead-colored," from Old French blo, bleu "pale, pallid, wan, light-colored; blond; discolored; blue, blue-gray," from Frankish *blao or some other Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *blæwaz (source also of Old English blaw, Old Saxon and Old High German blao, Danish blaa, Swedish blå, Old Frisian blau, Middle Dutch bla, Dutch blauw, German blau "blue").


This will be included on the quiz on Friday.

Is the sky really blue?



The way humans perceive color is mind-numbingly complex. The latest study, for example, delves into the mechanism behind how we've come to see in the blue light spectrum, and it involved analyzing 5,040 combinations of amino acids that could have evolved from seven mutations. The overall view, however, is less daunting -- and fascinating. Here are five intriguing discoveries that color our world.

Superhuman Vision Coming to Mere Mortals

"We definitely do not see blue like other animals," Jay Neitz, a professor of vision sciences at the University of Washington, told Discovery News. "We actually use a combination of what people would call blue and green and use both of those for seeing blue." Scientifically, the wave length for peak sensitivity for the human blue cone is 415 nanometers. "If I showed it to you, you'd see it was violet or purple," Neitz said. What we call blue checks in at 480 nanometers -- that's the color used to represent blue in television screens.



Yes the horizon looks paler blue or almost white, in the middle of a clear day.

So would you say the blue color is most influenced by oxygen?



posted on Oct, 12 2018 @ 06:50 PM
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originally posted by: norhoc
a reply to: CainHarmbank


Is Google broke?


Is Google all knowing?



posted on Oct, 12 2018 @ 06:50 PM
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edit on 12-10-2018 by CainHarmbank because: (no reason given)




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