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Voyager II on verge of crossing into Interstellar Space

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posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: seagull
Your post got me intrigued and I found a visual representation of how far (not very), even our radio waves have gone in comparison to the Milky Way, wow, just wow.
Link




posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 01:39 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

wow



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Very very small fish in a very very big pond.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: St Udio

visuals are always more self explanatory... so here's a short version...

the Voyager 2 is currently bursting through the southern bow-wave of the heliosphere
the Voyager 1 craft, long ago, headed toward the northern bow-wave of the heliosphere


fast forward to the 2:00 time line of the animated graphic to see how they 'diverged' at the outer planet of the solar system on their journey to interstellar space


www.bing.com...[/qu ote]

Outstanding! Thanks for the added content.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 03:41 PM
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originally posted by: jadedANDcynical
a reply to: Assassin82

I have a vague memory of these being launched, I grew up not far at all from NASA Johnson Space Center, aka Mission Control. Went to school with several of the eggheads kids who worked there and so have always had space science in the background of my life.

That these machines are still sending a signal that can be picked up all these decades later is incredible and really gives a sense of scale as to the vastness of the distances we are seeing demonstrated here.


It’s incredible, really, when you consider we’ve only even been airplanes for 115 years. In that time we managed to get something as far as the Voyagers have gone. And then, in the grand scale of the universe...it’s nothing.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 03:42 PM
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originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
Nice article here on the people who run the probe:

www.nytimes.com...

Most of them have been with it from the outset and want to see it through until it runs out of juice.


Those are dedicated people. Great to seem them being passionate about their work and sticking it out.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 03:48 PM
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originally posted by: St Udio

visuals are always more self explanatory... so here's a short version...

the Voyager 2 is currently bursting through the southern bow-wave of the heliosphere
the Voyager 1 craft, long ago, headed toward the northern bow-wave of the heliosphere


fast forward to the 2:00 time line of the animated graphic to see how they 'diverged' at the outer planet of the solar system on their journey to interstellar space


www.bing.com...[/qu ote]

That was a cool video! I appreciate the visual representation. Do you happen to know the reason for their different trajectories?



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 04:25 PM
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a reply to: St Udio

Sorry, this video is no longer available.







posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
Our solar system must be fairly debree free for it to not have taken any hits right?


There's also sorts of meteorite dust and debris floating around the solar system. The distribution is actually a power equation. For the Moon, for every 1 object that is 250 kilometers in radii, there are maybe 4.5 objects 125 kilometers in radii, and it scales down. But the moon hasn't been hit by anything that large. It's only object less that 100 meters in radii that are encountered, and that's only once every few years.

Jupiter and Saturn sweep a lot of the larger objects up - they can warp the path of anything incoming on the orbital plane from millions of miles away. They even perturb the orbit of Earth slightly.



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 04:55 PM
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a reply to: BeefNoMeat

Went and watched that Netflix show after reading your post and it was great!


Thanks
edit on 8-10-2018 by ausername because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: incoserv

We might not even have to go to deep space to find microorganisms outside Earth's biosphere.

There are 3 distinct reservoirs of organic compounds in the Saturn system, Enceladus, Titan, and now the ring system:

Saturn’s Rings Rain Organic Compounds Into Its Atmosphere

And don't forget the tardigrades:


Tardigrades, often called water bears or moss piglets, are near-microscopic animals with long, plump bodies and scrunched-up heads. They have eight legs, and hands with four to eight claws on each. While strangely cute, these tiny animals are almost indestructible and can even survive in outer space.

Tardigrade is a phylum, a high-level scientific category of animal. (Humans belong in the Chordate phylum — animals with spinal cords.) There are over 1,000 known species within Tardigrade, according to Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS).


Live Science



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 05:38 PM
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So long, Voyager! See you again when you return as V'Ger!



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 07:21 PM
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This has always driven me nuts when they say they're "leaving the solar system". They're only a small percentage of the distance to the Oort cloud, which is still part of our system. They haven't left the system.


originally posted by: CornishCeltGuy
a reply to: toysforadults
I've always wondered that, maybe it's just a vastness I struggle to comprehend so two little probes are safe enough for millions of miles.
I love this story though, I was only a toddler when they blasted off.


Billions of miles actually. The vastness really is the thing that keeps them from getting hit. There are only 8 planets in our system, but there are millions of smaller objects (trillions if you count the Oort cloud). It's just there is so much space in between them that the odds of hitting something are low. Even the relatively "dense" asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter isn't a problem to fly through. On average, standing on one asteroid in the belt, you wouldn't even be able to see any of the others.

That said, they've likely been hit by very small objects. If you were able to go take a look at them right now, they'd probably be covered in tiny impact marks.


originally posted by: Fallingdown
It might come back in 1000 years destroy three Klingon war birds and threaten the universe.

Wait?

Never mind that's a Star Trek movie .



It was only like 300 years.

edit on 8 10 18 by face23785 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 10:16 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04
They will still be traveling through space billions of years after the sun has burned out if nothing stops them. Somebody might find them someday.

Maybe 1000 years from now we figure out a warp drive and go get them ourselves and put them in a museum...



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 10:35 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Better that then the Whale Probe!



posted on Oct, 8 2018 @ 10:43 PM
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The first television broadcast, from the Empire State building on July 7, 1936.

NBC/RCA first broadcast


82 years ago, has made it to at least 230+ stars. Presently this broadcast is hitting Regulus and Alcor....

Stars within 100 Light Years

Pretty awesome when you think about it.

edit on 8-10-2018 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught

edit on 8-10-2018 by charlyv because: s



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 04:12 AM
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a reply to: face23785

This is a common misunderstanding when people hear the words "interstellar medium", many automatically think this means it 'left the solar system'. This is incorrect.

To put things into perspective here, Voyager 1 won't even reach the Oort Cloud in our lifetimes. In fact, it will take nearly another 300 years just to get "to" it. Once it reaches the Oort Cloud it will take another 30,000 YEARS to pass through it! Only THEN will Voyager 1 have truly "exited our Solar System". For folks having a hard time wrapping their head around this time frame, it will be another 303 CENTURIES (three hundred three entire generations, end to end) before truly 'leaving'.

To put things in even clearer focus; evolved mankind has existed on planet Earth for arguably ~50,000 years (300,000 if you include using rocks for tools). Therefore, for Voyager 1 to truly exit our Solar System will require 2/3rds of the time mankind has existed on Earth to date.

That's a REALLY LONG time! No human you could ever even know will be around to see it. And, that's just our Solar System! Not even close to the nearest star. That kind of puts the head-scratching scale of interplanetary travel into perspective.

On a dorky side note, when I was a kid I collected stamps. I remember the Voyager 1 and 2 launches. I can remember going down to the post office and getting the US Postal stamps commemorating the launches of Voyager 1 and 2. I still have those stamps today.
edit on 10/9/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 06:11 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: face23785

This is a common misunderstanding when people hear the words "interstellar medium", many automatically think this means it 'left the solar system'. This is incorrect.

To put things into perspective here, Voyager 1 won't even reach the Oort Cloud in our lifetimes. In fact, it will take nearly another 300 years just to get "to" it. Once it reaches the Oort Cloud it will take another 30,000 YEARS to pass through it! Only THEN will Voyager 1 have truly "exited our Solar System". For folks having a hard time wrapping their head around this time frame, it will be another 303 CENTURIES (three hundred three entire generations, end to end) before truly 'leaving'.

To put things in even clearer focus; evolved mankind has existed on planet Earth for arguably ~50,000 years (300,000 if you include using rocks for tools). Therefore, for Voyager 1 to truly exit our Solar System will require 2/3rds of the time mankind has existed on Earth to date.

That's a REALLY LONG time! No human you could ever even know will be around to see it. And, that's just our Solar System! Not even close to the nearest star. That kind of puts the head-scratching scale of interplanetary travel into perspective.

On a dorky side note, when I was a kid I collected stamps. I remember the Voyager 1 and 2 launches. I can remember going down to the post office and getting the US Postal stamps commemorating the launches of Voyager 1 and 2. I still have those stamps today.


Trying to grasp the true vastness of space is in a way, both fun and frustrating.

Curious about the stamps, as I’ve never been a collector; do they gain any significant monetary value? Or just personal value?



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 06:14 AM
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originally posted by: charlyv
The first television broadcast, from the Empire State building on July 7, 1936.

NBC/RCA first broadcast


82 years ago, has made it to at least 230+ stars. Presently this broadcast is hitting Regulus and Alcor....

Stars within 100 Light Years

Pretty awesome when you think about it.


If an alien civilization picks up the broadcasts and watches our content without expressed written consent by a proven authority, is it considered piracy?

That would mean we have alien pirates to deal with!



posted on Oct, 9 2018 @ 06:16 AM
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Maybe 1000 years from now we figure out a warp drive and go get them ourselves and put them in a museum...


That would be pretty awesome!




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