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UK and Boeing E-7 Wedgetail Early Warning and Control aircraft

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posted on Oct, 6 2018 @ 07:08 AM
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I have been keeping a weather eye on the UK's early warning requirements for a bit. Now it looks like the UK is going to go for the E-7 Wedgetail to replace their E-3Ds. This also gives a nod to Australia who will benefit from this procurement, and may well have featured (unofficially) in the discussions when Australia selected the F26 frigate a few months back.


Following market analysis and discussions with other potential providers, the MOD has concluded that the potential procurement of the E-7 represents the best value for money option for the UK against need, whilst representing a significant opportunity for increased defence cooperation and collaboration with our key ally Australia.


Def Journal Source
Also piece in Flightglobal

Anyway, E-3 is also used elsewhere, and by NATO. One wonders when these will be lined up for replacement (c. 2030s?), although I guess the French and Germans will push an Airbus solution




posted on Oct, 6 2018 @ 07:12 AM
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How many are we getting?

a reply to: paraphi



posted on Oct, 6 2018 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: blackbird9393

The UK has seven E-3Ds, of which six are operational and one is a training unit.

Whether the UK will buy E-7s for a one-for-one replacement is not stated. Who knows?



posted on Oct, 6 2018 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: paraphi

Airbus building a C4i platform will be risky and costly. The only AEW&C platform they build now is the C295. Airbus is looking at the A320 and A330 as the basis for one, and India wants an A330 based platform, but the E-7A is already operational, has a huge supply base already operating for 737 parts, and meets almost every requirement any nation can have. France and Germany will be hard pressed to justify an essentially clean sheet design, and the costs when there's a reasonable alternative already.

If they don't want the E-7, there are other alternatives as well. Not quite as capable or flexible but they're out there.



posted on Oct, 6 2018 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Not to mention Ill bet they have a same type rating with the P-8 given the airframe commonality plus they have already been operational for some time.



posted on Oct, 6 2018 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Same type rating, and parts commonality between the two, which radically simplifies things maintenance wise. They'll be able to use the same hangars, flight simulators for the pilots, maintenance stands, etc.
edit on 10/6/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2018 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: paraphi
The FG article you linked said that while numbers have not been specifically stated, they are looking at 4-6 airframes for more than $1 billion US. I would think 6 sounds about right given they currently have that many E-3's operational, 4 sounds like too little after training and maintenance is taken into consideration.



posted on Oct, 7 2018 @ 04:40 AM
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a reply to: thebozeian

Indeed, but the number ain't confirmed, so it's speculation. If experience is anything to go then the eventual order will be for a lesser number, with the argument that the new aircraft are more capable to what they are replacing.

Funding is key here and it will be "... how many aircraft for £1.5+/- billion"! I say £1.5B as the sums seem to differ depending on what's read about this potential buy.

Also, it'll be interesting to see what industrial / tech offsets the UK can gain from this deal, and how much the E-7 can be customised with British kit.

edit on 7/10/2018 by paraphi because: (no reason given)




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