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In the beginning... Time, planets and life.

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posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 05:34 AM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman

originally posted by: TerraLiga

Question 3: Is 5.5 billion years enough time to produce the variety of elements required to produce the matter to statistically create more than one planet to support advanced multicellular life?


I just dont get how time produces elements, how does that work

It's called stellar nucleosynthesis and supernova nucleosynthesis. Simply put, lighter elements like hydrogen and helium are fused into heavier elements inside stars and in supernova explosions.

Some of the key early reactions are hydrogen fusing into helium, helium fusing into carbon, and carbon fusing into a whole bunch of elements like Neon, Sodium, and Magnesium.

Supernovae, through their sheer power and extreme temperatures and pressures, produce much heavier elements like gold and uranium.

Since the universe started with just hydrogen and some helium, it took time for stars and supernovae to "enrich" the universe with heavier elements which are necessary for formation of planets and appearance of life.


www.youtube.com...
edit on 5-10-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 05:59 AM
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I made a mistake in my reply.

The early universe cooled to below 3000k after 380,000 years. Not 180,000.

To add to wildespace's reply.

You might not like the author/reader. But the content is accurate according to science.




posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 06:25 AM
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originally posted by: WUNK22
Ok my head is spinning!! The universe is to much for my human mind to comprehend,,,,,wait I’m a space man!! You guys have got it all wrong.


You are in space.

And more than that, when the big bang spread matter into every corner of an expanding, infinite universe, a tiny tiny part of it coalesced into each and every one of us. We are made from space stuff.

So not only are we all in space, we are space.



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 06:35 AM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman

originally posted by: TerraLiga

Question 3: Is 5.5 billion years enough time to produce the variety of elements required to produce the matter to statistically create more than one planet to support advanced multicellular life?


I just dont get how time produces elements, how does that work

and No, this is not a religious post, please put away your swords.


Stuff. An indeterminate and undefinable substance, possible with an odour, and perhaps with taste, that exists everywhere in the cosmos, created with time has enough of itself to create anything.

Simply add the right constituents together, add time, and you can create stuff.




posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 07:42 AM
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originally posted by: TerraLiga

originally posted by: Raggedyman


originally posted by: TerraLiga



Question 3: Is 5.5 billion years enough time to produce the variety of elements required to produce the matter to statistically create more than one planet to support advanced multicellular life?




I just dont get how time produces elements, how does that work



and No, this is not a religious post, please put away your swords.



Time doesn’t produce mass, supernovae do. Billions or more likely, many trillions of stars had to die to create even the visible mass we calculate in our universe. It would have taken many billions of big supernova just to create Earth.


Close, but not quite right. The hydrogen and helium (plus a trace amount of lithium) that were the only elements present after the big bang WERE mass. There was just as much matter then as there is today, but ALL of that matter was in the form of those three elements.

As you indicated, then stars began forming from the hydrogen, and the heat and pressure in those stars allowed the hydrogen, helium, and lithium to fuse into heavier elements (nucleosynthesis). Then the next generation of stars were built from hydrogen plus these slightly heavy elements. And when stars explode, the pressures make even heavier elements yet (as does the collision of two neutron stars)...



However, the important point is that the amount of matter that existed as hydrogen and helium prior to the birth of stars is virtually the same amount of matter that exists today in the heavier elements. The matter that makes up the heavier elements today IS the matter that made up the primordial hydrogen and helium.

It's not a question of the gaseous matter turning solid. It's a question of light elements fusing/synthesizing into heavier elements.


edit on 2018/10/5 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 07:50 AM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman

originally posted by: TerraLiga

Question 3: Is 5.5 billion years enough time to produce the variety of elements required to produce the matter to statistically create more than one planet to support advanced multicellular life?


I just dont get how time produces elements, how does that work

and No, this is not a religious post, please put away your swords.


Heavier elements can be created through fusion which requires a large amount of heat and pressure. something called rapid neutron capture occurs problem is it only occurs during a supernova. So any element higher than Iron can only be created by a star exploding. All other elements up to iron can be created in any star using fusion.

hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 07:54 AM
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originally posted by: Parishna
And more than that, when the big bang spread matter into every corner of an expanding, infinite universe...



Not exactly. The Big Bang (as the theory goes) did not spread matter into every corner of the universe, per se, because there was no universe in which to spread matter. And when I say "no universe", I mean no fabric of space-time in which we (the stuff that makes us) could exist.

According to the theory, the universe and all the stuff in it all expanded together after the Big Bang.

That is to say, the Big Bang was not an explosion that sent the stuff everywhere through the universe, but was an expansion of the universe itself (a universe full of stuff).



edit on 5/10/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: speelling



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 08:19 AM
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originally posted by: Toolman18
a reply to: TerraLiga

And our universe is expanding, right? What's it expanding in to?


This is a difficult question but the simple answer is nothing. What we believe is happening is every part of the universe, every distance between every pair of galaxies, is being "stretched", but the overall size of the universe was infinitely big to begin with and continues to remain infinitely big as time goes on, so the universe's size doesn't change and not expanding in to anything.

how can the universe be expanding if there is no end or edge to it?
The universe might wrap around itself in a higher dimension in the same way that the 2D surface of a sphere wraps around itself in three dimensions. If space wraps around itself we can't find an edge and travel in any direction will just wrap back around into our universe. But the reality is even if it does have an edge we could never see it and would never be able to be proven so its a question that couldn't be answered. .



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 08:37 AM
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a reply to: Toolman18

Questions that I've asked many people who claim that there isn't something behind the creation of the universe, something or someone whatever you religious belief is and no I'm not religious at all but I am and have started to think that there is an intelligent design to the universe, to much needs to be perfect (according to scientists) to make the Universe that we have around us today so I completely agree with you.



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 08:58 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr




The universe might wrap around itself in a higher dimension in the same way that the 2D surface of a sphere wraps around itself in three dimensions.


It could also wrap itself more than once. Meaning we actually observe stars/galaxies etc more than once. But they're redshifted with each wrap/layer. (I think that means age of universe could be wrong).

Or it could be flat and infinite. 13.8 billion years old. But. Approx 46 billion light years big. Due to cosmic inflation.

Or something else.



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: ooder57

I have applied myself to scientific academia. That's why I can put forth questions no one can answer.



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: TerraLigaseriously
Explain how these things even were created. Why is hydrogen even hydrogen. What created these things?



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 09:44 AM
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a reply to: Toolman18

www.webelements.com...



The number of protons in the nucleus defines to what chemical element the atom belongs: for example, all copper atoms contain 29 protons. The number of neutrons defines the isotope of the element. The number of electrons influences the magnetic properties of an atom. Atoms can attach to one or more other atoms by chemical bonds to form chemical compounds such as molecules. The ability of atoms to associate and dissociate is responsible for most of the physical changes observed in nature and is the subject of the discipline of chemistry.


From here.

en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 5-10-2018 by blackcrowe because: add more info




Hydrogen is a chemical element with symbol H and atomic number 1. With a standard atomic weight of 1.008, hydrogen is the lightest element on the periodic table. Its monatomic form (H) is the most abundant chemical substance in the Universe, constituting roughly 75% of all baryonic mass.[7][note 1] Non-remnant stars are mainly composed of hydrogen in the plasma state. The most common isotope of hydrogen, termed protium (name rarely used, symbol 1H), has one proton and no neutrons.


From here.

en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 5-10-2018 by blackcrowe because: add link



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: Parishna

So alchemy is a scientific fact, really
Oh no, deny ignorance or embrace it?



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

Do you really believe that is a scientific statement?
I am amazed what you believe is science



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 11:28 AM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman
a reply to: Parishna

So alchemy is a scientific fact, really
Oh no, deny ignorance or embrace it?


Science doesn't deny the idea of transmutation of elements (which is what alchemy is). In fact, it is done somewhat routinely. Transmuting one element into another can happen in a modern particle accelerator. Lead can in fact be turned into gold using the equipment we have today.



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 11:36 AM
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originally posted by: Toolman18
a reply to: TerraLigaseriously
Explain how these things even were created. Why is hydrogen even hydrogen. What created these things?

Simply put, I can’t explain. Hydrogen and helium are the two most basic elements, so if any elements were to exist it would be them. How, I have no idea.

From those two, with the addition of heat and pressure you can create all the other elements in the periodic table.



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Wow thanks, that's amazing, never knew
Might have to research this, first I have heard of it



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: Toolman18
Explain how these things even were created. Why is hydrogen even hydrogen. What created these things?


According to the Big Bang theory, in the chronology of the extremely early universe (less than 10 seconds after the Big Bang), the universe was too hot energetic for parts of the atom -- protons, neutrons, and electrons -- to be held together in the form of an atom. Going back even farther -- in the fractions of a nanosecond after the Big Bang -- the universe was too energetic even for quarks (the smaller particles that make protons and neutrons) to combine to form those protons and neutrons.

It was not until after about 10 seconds (maybe a bit longer) that the universe cooled enough to allow protons, neutrons, and electrons to come together to make the first atoms -- hydrogen, helium, and trace amounts of lithium.

These were the first atoms because they are the simplest to form from the protons, neutrons, and electrons that were now free to coalesce into atoms (free to do so in the less energetic universe a second after the Big Bang).



That's what particle accelerators do. They use very high energy collisions in order to very briefly recreate the energies of the early universe in order to pull apart the components of an atom. In the shower of particles that come out of these collisions are some of the particles that existed prior to the universe cooling and coalescing into the atoms we have today.


edit on 5/10/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 12:27 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: Parishna
And more than that, when the big bang spread matter into every corner of an expanding, infinite universe...



Not exactly. The Big Bang (as the theory goes) did not spread matter into every corner of the universe, per se, because there was no universe in which to spread matter. And when I say "no universe", I mean no fabric of space-time in which we (the stuff that makes us) could exist.

According to the theory, the universe and all the stuff in it all expanded together after the Big Bang.

That is to say, the Big Bang was not an explosion that sent the stuff everywhere through the universe, but was an expansion of the universe itself (a universe full of stuff).




Or simply put.... God created it all. With human footprints found below dino footprints, I think there was a race of humans here that advanced and were eventually wiped out, perhaps, by the same comet that killed the dinos. In this unproven and unscientific theory, they progressed to the dangerous level humans are again advancing towards. Which brings me to another topic... How old are the Pyramids, really? Who built them? There weren't enough men, as we know men to look, in those days to lift those perfectly cut multi-ton stones and if there were, how did they get them up past the first level? No tree would be strong enough to support a ramp to climb, no rope, not even a chain from today. There are lots of questions out there that we'll never be able to answer, the universe and solar systems is just one more.







 
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