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In the beginning... Time, planets and life.

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posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 09:21 PM
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No, this is not a religious post, please put away your swords.

I’m trying to figure out the probability of various things - life in the universe is one. Here’s how I see it, but I have plenty of questions and even more blanks to fill in, so please be my guest.

-13.7 bya
The universe as we know it began its inflation very very quickly. Its contents were approx 98% helium, hydrogen and their isotopes, along with trace elements of other gases like lithium. No ‘metals’ or solids, or any elements to make them. The universe, as far as we know, continues to expand even to this day.

~ -13.3 bya
Gas starts to coalesce into massive ‘clouds’ and the first protostars are born. Estimates are several hundred million to several hundred billion of these giant gas cloud clusters are present in the universe.

~ -13.2 bya
The first true stars are formed from the protostars. These first stars are enormous - I mean really big! Even the smallest are estimated to be several hundred thousand times the mass of our star, while many are several million times the mass. Most of the gas in each of the clusters is formed into these massive stars. There are no planets around them - remember the only elements that exist in the universe are gaseous. They are extremely hot and extremely bright, and this combination makes them very short-lived.

~ -12.5 bya
The first supernovae occur. Vast explosions that not only spread gas, but also create the first ‘metals’ - elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. As these stars were so big we also see the first black holes. You could conveniently call them supermassive black holes.

Question 1: Are these first black holes the very same supermassive black holes we see in the centre of large galaxies like our own Milky Way?

~ -12 bya
By now all or the vast majority of these original stars have gone supernova. The detritus have formed protogalaxies, each now forming many proportionally smaller stars within them. These second-generation stars still do not have enough variation and variety of elements to form solid-mass planets.

Question 2: How many supernova either across the universe or locally within galaxy regions will it take to produce enough variety of elements to produce the solid mass to create rocky planets?

~ -10 bya
Protogalaxy clusters are now typically on their 4th or 5th supernova generations and galaxial regions are more defined into something resembling what we would recognise now.

-4.5 bya
Enough solid matter is present in the universe to produce rocky planets around stars, including our own solar system. Earth is born.

Question 3: Is 5.5 billion years enough time to produce the variety of elements required to produce the matter to statistically create more than one planet to support advanced multicellular life?




posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 09:51 PM
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Ok my head is spinning!! The universe is to much for my human mind to comprehend,,,,,wait I’m a space man!! You guys have got it all wrong.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 09:55 PM
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originally posted by: TerraLiga

Question 3: Is 5.5 billion years enough time to produce the variety of elements required to produce the matter to statistically create more than one planet to support advanced multicellular life?


I just dont get how time produces elements, how does that work

and No, this is not a religious post, please put away your swords.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: TerraLiga

You missed out on how do these expanding gasses exist in the first place? And at the perfect pressure? Any other small change and hydrogen doesn't exist. So how can you say these things existed in the beginning of the universe?



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:02 PM
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If everything was rushing out so quickly at first and super dense, then time would’ve been distorted, like the idea in “Interstellar.” So timing is kinda hard, I would say... A lot of the stuff probably happened in like a super-fast/slow mode... or it’s all a program, like the Matrix.



edit on 10/4/2018 by japhrimu because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:03 PM
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gravity has a big impact on a lot..different stars have different gravity theyre built of different gasses



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:04 PM
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a reply to: Toolman18

And gasses don't pull together to make solids. They just don't.
Stop believing what you are taught and actually think about it.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:06 PM
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either way.. we'll get sucked up by the sun or the black hole at the center of the milky way



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:07 PM
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no but gasses can condense. look at jupiter.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: TerraLiga

And our universe is expanding, right? What's it expanding in to?



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:09 PM
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could become exoplanets



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:09 PM
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i doubt it tho.. we'd die from our own sun before that.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:14 PM
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honestly, i think its infinite. the universe and stuff.. if we're involving time and other stuff.. that means that gives rise to possibilities; different timelines, different lives we already lived.. but i mean i could be wrong.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:16 PM
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a reply to: Toolman18

Toolman, you ask alot of great questions, ones in which scientists are working toward unveiling the answers to.

Sounds like you'd thrive if you applied yourself to scientific acadamia. Science demands you question your own hypotheses from several different perspectives in order to find the facts.

But first, you must be willing to learn from people more wise than you.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 11:18 PM
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If Black Holes could be warp tunnels, then other elements could bleed through them. Possibly from somewhere in a different part of the multiverse.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 11:58 PM
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originally posted by: Toolman18
a reply to: TerraLiga

And our universe is expanding, right? What's it expanding in to?


Good question. If the universe is infinite, then how does it expand beyond that???



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 12:22 AM
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originally posted by: new_here

originally posted by: Toolman18
a reply to: TerraLiga

And our universe is expanding, right? What's it expanding in to?


Good question. If the universe is infinite, then how does it expand beyond that???


It's expanding into the void left behind by the previous universe, in an infinite cycle of expansion and contraction. Or the reality we perceive is a simulation and the universe is simply programmed that way.🙃



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 02:15 AM
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a reply to: TerraLiga


Very close to the very beginning, scientists think, there were black holes. These black holes, which astronomers have never directly detected, didn't form in the usual way: the explosive collapse of a big, dying star into its own gravity well. The matter in these black holes, researchers believe, wasn't crushed into a singularity by the last gasps of an old star. Indeed, back then, in the first 1 billion or so years of the universe, there were no old stars. Instead, there were huge clouds of matter, filling space, seeding the earliest galaxies. Some of that matter, researchers believe, clumped together more tightly, though, collapsing into its own gravity well just like old stars later did as the universe aged. Those collapses, researchers believe, seeded supermassive black holes that had no previous life as stars. Astronomers call these singularities "direct collapse black holes" (DCBHs).



The problem with this theory, though, is that nobody has ever found one. [The 18 Biggest Unsolved Mysteries in Physics]



But that could change. A new paper from the Georgia Institute of Technology published Sept. 10 in the journal Nature Astronomyproposes that the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which NASA intends to launch at some point in the next several years, should be sensitive enough to detect a galaxy containing a black hole from this ancient period of the universe's history. And the new study proposes a set of signatures that could be used to identify a DCBH-hosting galaxy.


From this link.

https: //www.livescience.com/63676-finding-the-oldest-black-holes.html?utm_source=lst-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20180926-lst

Also. The huge gas stars/galaxies in the early part of the universe would have been blue in colour.

They were formed from hydrogen. Which was apparently spread evenly across the universe at one point. The molecules were brought together when the forces emerged. (From a doc i watched from BBC. Said gravity brought the hydrogen atoms together) although. I think the electromagnetic force is what brings atoms together. Gravity holds mass together. Might be wrong. Please correct me if i am.

That's why. When searching for the oldest stars/galaxies. They look for targets with little or no iron in them.

You forgot to mention temperature.

The first 180,000 years of the universe was billions of degrees. But cooled down to 6000 k during this time. Which allowed the forces and particles to create mass.

We really need the JWT in space asap. Hopefully. It will provide many answers.



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 05:16 AM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman

originally posted by: TerraLiga

Question 3: Is 5.5 billion years enough time to produce the variety of elements required to produce the matter to statistically create more than one planet to support advanced multicellular life?


I just dont get how time produces elements, how does that work

and No, this is not a religious post, please put away your swords.

Time doesn’t produce mass, supernovae do. Billions or more likely, many trillions of stars had to die to create even the visible mass we calculate in our universe. It would have taken many billions of big supernova just to create Earth.



posted on Oct, 5 2018 @ 05:19 AM
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originally posted by: Toolman18
a reply to: Toolman18

And gasses don't pull together to make solids. They just don't.
Stop believing what you are taught and actually think about it.

Condensed gas can appear and act like a solid. Look at Jupiter - almost totally gas and is the most massive body in our solar system (and most influential) other than the sun.







 
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