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100% proof of life on other planets.

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posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 01:39 AM
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a reply to: tonycodes

No and no.
We live on the most habitable planet we know of yet we have only ever had 1 genosis, so by this life isn't as abundant as you think. It reminds me of the Fermi paradox, where the hell is everybody..




posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 01:47 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: tonycodes


One day, some of Earth's remnants will become comets for other species to study and come to the same conclusion you did.



Just to make sure that happens we should put all of ATS on a flash drive and shoot it into space. I think the intense research on ATS and everlasting discussions of culture earned that.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 01:47 AM
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a reply to: tonycodes

So where is the proof? All I see are claims and assumptions.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 01:49 AM
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originally posted by: moebius
a reply to: tonycodes

So where is the proof? All I see are claims and assumptions.


Proof that comets contain H20? I posted a screenshot of TPTB saying comets are made of H20.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 01:50 AM
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originally posted by: tonycodes

originally posted by: Gothmog



And if you find water, you will find life living in it.

Right......
NOT


I’m sure there are exceptions but I am confident in the logic that lots of comets = lots of H20 in space = 100% fact that there is enough water in space to create life. I just don’t think that much water in space can exist without other life besides us existing too.

Careful what when folks say the word "water".
It helps their cause by stating water instead of liquid
Even noticed that mistake in terminology coming from NASA themselves
Well , it could be normal water. Or ammonia , etc...




posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 01:54 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: tonycodes

originally posted by: Gothmog



And if you find water, you will find life living in it.

Right......
NOT


I’m sure there are exceptions but I am confident in the logic that lots of comets = lots of H20 in space = 100% fact that there is enough water in space to create life. I just don’t think that much water in space can exist without other life besides us existing too.

Careful what when folks say the word "water".
It helps their cause by stating water instead of liquid
Even noticed that mistake in terminology coming from NASA themselves
Well , it could be normal water. Or ammonia , etc...



Well sure but do you really think they mean dirty snowball ice that is mostly chemical and not H20.. I’m pretty sure they reference comets as having normal H20 ice. The mars water theory is argued bc of ammonia ice but that is bc of mars environment, comets come from all over the galaxy so their original environment is unknown.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 01:55 AM
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originally posted by: muSSang
a reply to: tonycodes

No and no.
We live on the most habitable planet we know of yet we have only ever had 1 genosis, so by this life isn't as abundant as you think. It reminds me of the Fermi paradox, where the hell is everybody..


I don’t know what you mean by genesis, I checked out the wiki and it talks mostly about the Bible and the English band lol



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 02:03 AM
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originally posted by: tonycodes

originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: tonycodes


One day, some of Earth's remnants will become comets for other species to study and come to the same conclusion you did.



Just to make sure that happens we should put all of ATS on a flash drive and shoot it into space. I think the intense research on ATS and everlasting discussions of culture earned that.


A neat idea, but I think only hobbyists archeologists in other civilizations would care. If a space-faring civilization finds that flash-drive, they're already WAAAAY beyond us technologically.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 02:10 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: tonycodes

originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: tonycodes


One day, some of Earth's remnants will become comets for other species to study and come to the same conclusion you did.



Just to make sure that happens we should put all of ATS on a flash drive and shoot it into space. I think the intense research on ATS and everlasting discussions of culture earned that.


A neat idea, but I think only hobbyists archeologists in other civilizations would care. If a space-faring civilization finds that flash-drive, they're already WAAAAY beyond us technologically.


Can we burn a solid gold dvd with all of ATS on it? They gotta appreciate that lol
edit on 28-9-2018 by tonycodes because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 02:13 AM
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a reply to: tonycodes




I’m pretty sure they reference comets as having normal H20 ice.

Please source something other than you being "pretty sure"



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 02:16 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: tonycodes




I’m pretty sure they reference comets as having normal H20 ice.

Please source something other than you being "pretty sure"


It just seems to me that the consensus among the greater science community is that there is an abundance of normal H2O in comets and asteroids out in space.


edit on 28-9-2018 by tonycodes because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 02:19 AM
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a reply to: tonycodes

There was a news blurb a few months ago that a 12 mile Liquid lake had been found in the southern hemisphere of Mars. www.abovetopsecret.com...

There are several moons in our solar system that have oceans underneath their icy crust. There was another article saying water was very abundant in the universe but I did not post a thread on the findings. Water is everywhere even in the depths of the earth where at one zone there is more water than all the surface oceans put together... I did a thread on that but to lazy to find it.

OK I felt guilty ...www.abovetopsecret.com...


edit on 727thk18 by 727Sky because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 02:25 AM
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originally posted by: 727Sky
a reply to: tonycodes

There was a news blurb a few months ago that a 12 mile Liquid lake had been found in the southern hemisphere of Mars. www.abovetopsecret.com...

There are several moons in our solar system that have oceans underneath their icy crust. There was another article saying water was very abundant in the universe but I did not post a thread on the findings. Water is everywhere even in the depths of the earth where at one zone there is more water than all the surface oceans put together... I did a thread on that but to lazy to find it.



I believe that Mars and many places in our solar system have normal H2O, I just have seen enough the rebuttals and they need answers too. I just don’t think we know of any bigger source of normal H2O for life than comets. And asteroids I guess fit in this narrative too. Not to ball them up, no pun intended



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 03:27 AM
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i completely totally believe in the existence of extraterrestrial life and know that it's only a matter of time [and us not blowing ourselves up] before we meet it

however, i think the assertion that water = life is pretty off-base.
For a start, it's easy to imagine exotic forms of life in places that liquid water could never exist - the methane oceans on Titan for example.
Also, just because all water has life on Earth doesn't mean that's true for all water. Ours was 'contaminated' from the start, we don't have the necessary control to determine what the normal factors are in this equation.

Basically i'm saying there's a pretty good chance we're gonna find some lifeless water out there in space sometime but that doesn't actually mean anything in a larger sense.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 03:37 AM
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a reply to: muSSang

The earth has been wiped out many times over the last billion years, 250 million years ago 95% of life was gone from a major meteor strike, but it came back, then the dinosaurs 36 million years ago, and were here because of that one. Makes you think life keeps popping its head back up, pretty resilient!



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 03:44 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: tonycodes


One day, some of Earth's remnants will become comets for other species to study and come to the same conclusion you did.



Isn't that a sad and lonely thing to ponder.

That one day, millions or billions of years from now, the earth is ruined into millions of tiny parts, flung through space without the sun to contain them, and for another million or billion years, travels towards no where... all that remains of the entirety of the earth, of humans and all of our wants, desires, achievements, successes and dreams, and the plethora of life that this sanctuary holds, gone but for a few frozen specs of organic stuff.. to eventually come crashing down on some unsuspecting infinitely distant planet, full of it's own fledgling life forms, studied, pondered, where imaginations may run wild with speculation, and then to be put into a glass box and sealed in an alien museum...

I'm quite sad now..



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 03:45 AM
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originally posted by: muSSang
a reply to: tonycodes

No and no.
We live on the most habitable planet we know of yet we have only ever had 1 genosis, so by this life isn't as abundant as you think. It reminds me of the Fermi paradox, where the hell is everybody..


The infinitely large giant reaches around infinity muttering "I know I left my lighter here, somewhere..."



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 03:46 AM
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a reply to: tonycodes

You just put the cart before the horse and spent the rest of the thread trying to prove that the horse is really a horse and not an ox.




posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 03:49 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: tonycodes

originally posted by: Gothmog



And if you find water, you will find life living in it.

Right......
NOT


I’m sure there are exceptions but I am confident in the logic that lots of comets = lots of H20 in space = 100% fact that there is enough water in space to create life. I just don’t think that much water in space can exist without other life besides us existing too.

Careful what when folks say the word "water".
It helps their cause by stating water instead of liquid
Even noticed that mistake in terminology coming from NASA themselves
Well , it could be normal water. Or ammonia , etc...



Some places, methane snows.

But I think only someone convoluting the point would not assume the idea is liquid water..

"Would you like a drink of water?"
"Yes please, I am parched!!" *gulps* *GAGS*
"Ha ha fooled you, it was hexane, got ya!"



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 03:51 AM
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originally posted by: Bone75
a reply to: tonycodes

You just put the cart before the horse and spent the rest of the thread trying to prove that the horse is really a horse and not an ox.





Well, someone must have had the idea to put the horse before the cart, before anyone had ever seen someone put a horse before a cart, in order for the horse to pull the cart...

Otherwise, people would have just gone "Nah, stupid idea, it would have already been done before if it was a good idea."







 
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