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Good News: NASA Searching for Technosignatures on Mars

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posted on Sep, 27 2018 @ 04:13 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: ArMaP
originally posted by: Blue Shift
I would like to see aliens but I mostly want to learn about the universe around me, and as nothing points to the existence of aliens in the solar system I'm not really expecting to see them any time soon, while I am very interested in the geology and meteorology of other planets and how they evolved.

So who are the other five of you?


I'm with ArMaP, at least in part.

I am interested in the geology of the other worlds in our solar system, because I see it as a glimpse of what kind of planets/environments are out there in other solar systems: Methane-Ocean worlds, gas giants with moons capable of supporting life of some kind, etc.

I'm also interested in the search for even microbial life in our solar system that can be shown to have a different independent genesis relative to Earth life (say on Titan, Enceladus, or a Jovian Moon). That's because if life began separately and independently on two different worlds in one solar system, that would be key evidence that life might ne an inevitable thing to have happen, and that the galaxy might be teeming with life.


Right now I do believe that life almost certainly exists elsewhere, but that's just due to the size and scope of the universe. However, I don't know how common life is; it might be extremely rare, meaning that while other civilizations likely exist, they might not be anywhere near us, and we may never find them.

On the other hand, if we find other independent life (even microbes) in our solar system, that's a big hint that life is common, which in turn means that there may be more than a few technological civilizations somewhere else in our galaxy.

edit on 27/9/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 27 2018 @ 04:31 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: ArMaP
originally posted by: Blue Shift
I would like to see aliens but I mostly want to learn about the universe around me, and as nothing points to the existence of aliens in the solar system I'm not really expecting to see them any time soon, while I am very interested in the geology and meteorology of other planets and how they evolved.

So who are the other five of you?

I am interested in the geology of the other worlds in our solar system, because I see it as a glimpse of what kind of planets/environments are out there in other solar systems: Methane-Ocean worlds, gas giants with moons capable of supporting life of some kind, etc.

That's what I'm saying. It all swings back around to life. Is there any? Where is it? What other possible conditions could support life? If we learn some other things along the way, then great. Maybe that knowledge can be applied to Earth in some positive way. Theoretically. But mapping wispy clouds on Mars is not the endgame.



posted on Sep, 27 2018 @ 05:13 PM
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a reply to: Dwoodward85


Or our saviours from the skies show their true nature




posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 01:35 AM
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A list of new news stories concerning technosignature:
news.google.com...



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 01:48 AM
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Mars is included in the search for alien technosignature:
"If alien technosignatures do exist on Mars or the moon, it’s conceivable that we could use Earth- or space-based telescopes to detect them. Or it could take a little digging, by a future moon or Mars rover — or even an astronaut’s hands. "
Quoted from www.nbcnews.com...



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 03:22 AM
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The source is the Daily Express (the Daily Star is its even lower rent stable mate). It would be incapable of correctly reporting the sum of 2+2, never mind interpreting the output of a NASA press release.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 03:49 AM
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Quote from the last paragraph in www.nbcnews.com...:
"None of the legitimate scientists who have wondered about the possibility of alien life right here on Earth expects that someday we will find a “smoking gun” proving that aliens once visited us or that Earth was once home to advanced beings that predated humans.”"
The above news report is misleading, because:
Alien technosignature is found on Mars and on Earth: DO NOT CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK IF YOU DON'T WANT TO VISIT MY WEBSITE:
wretchfossil.blogspot.com...

edit on 28-9-2018 by FossilLin because: to shorten the quote

edit on 28-9-2018 by FossilLin because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 08:15 AM
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originally posted by: FossilLin
Mars is included in the search for alien technosignature:

That's the opinion of two scientists, that, as far as the article goes, do not have any means of doing the search themselves.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 08:22 AM
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originally posted by: FossilLin
The above news report is misleading, because:
Alien technosignature is found on Mars and on Earth

Saying that the report is misleading based on your opinion means nothing, as an opinion is not a fact.

But thanks for always warning us that you are linking to your ow blog.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 11:23 AM
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originally posted by: FossilLin
Mars is included in the search for alien technosignature:
"If alien technosignatures do exist on Mars or the moon, it’s conceivable that we could use Earth- or space-based telescopes to detect them. Or it could take a little digging, by a future moon or Mars rover — or even an astronaut’s hands. "
Quoted from www.nbcnews.com...

That quote belongs to an astrophysicist Jason Wright who's not working for NASA. As stated on his Twitter, "Opinions are my own".



posted on Sep, 29 2018 @ 01:26 AM
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a reply to: FossilLin

There is not a shred of evidence for naturally formed basalt columns. Man-made basalt columns is a fact, not an opinion. One of many evidences for the claim: Horizontal lava cannot produce vertical basalt columns.
edit on 29-9-2018 by FossilLin because: to fully explain my original reply



posted on Sep, 29 2018 @ 04:48 AM
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originally posted by: FossilLin
One of many evidences for the claim: Horizontal lava cannot produce vertical basalt columns.

Without even thinking if that is true or not, one question: can vertical lava produce vertical basalt columns?
edit on 29/9/2018 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2018 @ 05:38 AM
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originally posted by: FossilLin
a reply to: FossilLin

There is not a shred of evidence for naturally formed basalt columns. Man-made basalt columns is a fact, not an opinion. One of many evidences for the claim: Horizontal lava cannot produce vertical basalt columns.

Whenever there's a vertical channel or outlet, lava will produce a volcanic plug.




posted on Sep, 29 2018 @ 08:10 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Almost no volcanic plug resembles basalt columns in their overall shapes or the individual columns of basalt columns.



posted on Sep, 29 2018 @ 08:21 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

No, vertical lava cannot produce vertical basalt columns. Vertical lava may produce volcanic plug, but volcanic plugs are almost totally different from basalt columns in their overall shape and the shape of individual basalt column.



posted on Sep, 29 2018 @ 08:53 AM
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originally posted by: FossilLin
a reply to: ArMaP

No, vertical lava cannot produce vertical basalt columns.


Why not?

As the surface of a basalt magma pool cools (either exposed to air or a cooler rock above), the surface of the pool -- which cools first, because it is the part adjacent to the cooler material -- can crack in hexagonal shapes similar to the shapes produced when a pool of mud cools.

After some time, the cooling effect travels downward through the lava pool, cracking along the same planes as the cracked surface above, eventually creating the basalt column. This can occur under the right conditions (i.e., when the cooling effect is from the surface down).

That's the general in-a-nutshell way it can happen, so what's the problem with that scenario?

edit on 2018/9/29 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2018 @ 01:05 PM
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originally posted by: FossilLin
No, vertical lava cannot produce vertical basalt columns.

OK, as you appear so sure of what you say I suppose you can support that you real facts, pointing what makes it impossible for vertical lava to produce vertical basalt columns.



posted on Sep, 29 2018 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: Box of Rain

No evidence in a nutshell: no evidence in volcanic plug (volcanic neck), no evidence in numerous flat bottoms of basalt columns, no evidence in the landform and overall shape of basalt columns such as these:
www.gigapan.com...



posted on Sep, 29 2018 @ 10:01 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

Reasons listed in my above post.



posted on Sep, 30 2018 @ 03:02 AM
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We clearly have a geology expert here, and he wouldn't be convinced by anything, not even numerous articles describing and showing basaltic volcanic plugs on Earth.







 
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