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Investigating the Invisible Color that Ancient People Couldn’t See

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posted on Sep, 20 2018 @ 09:02 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

I suppose you could see it that way but, like you stated, "The human mind is a tricky thing when it comes to conceptualisation." Just having a word for blue trains the mind. Since you were a child you have heard the sky is blue. If there was no word for blue, you likely wouldn't even think about it. Maybe you would look at the sky and think sky is rain today but you wouldn't think about the color. There would be no reason to notice it. It would be invisible to you.

It's a question of cognition. You can see or hear something your entire life and never notice it unless someone points it out to you. Then it becomes real.

When I was young, I spent a lot of time in the woods. I would hike, picnic, play with my friends. As I grew older, I met someone that knew a lot about trees. I would walk around with him hiking or hunting and he pointed out all the different trees and how to identify them by their leaves, bark, where they grew, etc. Up till then, I only knew a few types - maple, oak, white birch, pine trees. Well, now I saw a lot more. Trees that were always there but I never knew they existed. It's not like I saw an empty forest, I didn't recognize what I was seeing. It didn't seem relevant to me. Much of it was invisible to me, especially the details. Yea, I knew there was a tree but I didn't know about that kind of bark, or leaf, or whatever. It was invisible to me.
edit on 20-9-2018 by toms54 because: add last part

edit on 20-9-2018 by toms54 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 20 2018 @ 09:40 PM
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I see ultraviolet, which I didn't know until took a bunch of tests for eyestrain issues with computer monitors. I knew I was getting a lot of dazzle and things seemed kind of irridescent "black-blue" to me. I didn't have a word for it, so I just called it blue-black shimmer. Now I know what it is. I was seeing it all the time, but I didn't know what it is.

BTW, in Scandinavia, the words for moose and elk are the same. But they're still different animals.



posted on Sep, 20 2018 @ 09:46 PM
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a reply to: Fowlerstoad

the square is just slightly lighter green than the others but it was very difficult to tell the difference and surely not at a glance. more like textured, or has more light lines going through it.
edit on 20-9-2018 by infolurker because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2018 @ 10:15 PM
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I've always thought the sea as being blue, but when I take a ferry, the water is always a green colour from the plankton. Perhaps they noticed that back then and just ignored it.
edit on 20-9-2018 by stormcell because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2018 @ 11:06 PM
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It’s also worth mentioning that black,white,red and yellow are the four cardinal colours of the Native American creation story.

a reply to: toms54


edit on 20-9-2018 by Athetos because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2018 @ 11:13 PM
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Something I thought I would mention here. Around 20 years ago I had a cataract in my right eye. The eye doctor replaced the lens with an artificial one. Works good but for one interesting problem. In my left normal eye when I look at a black light bar it's actually black with a little purple light around it. The right eye sees the same light bar as a bright purple. And quite a bit of purple light shining from it. I have also noticed that white has a bit of a yellowish cast to it viewing it with the left eye verses the right eye. And colors in the right eye seem a little brighter vs the left one.

Could there have been something that causes the normal lenses to discolor a bit? Or something common back then that caused the lenses of the eyes to discolor and make certain colors invisible? Just a thought.
edit on 20-9-2018 by ntech because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2018 @ 11:36 PM
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Interesting factoid, here in Japan blue and green are sometimes interchangeable which use to confused me as to how they can't tell the difference.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 12:00 AM
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Thanks, interesting thread topic I haven't further delved into yet. Thread offers an avenue for that. Modern wise, kinda reminds me of how the colored(blue vs gold) dress vs dress meme had people seeing different colors.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 12:38 AM
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a reply to: trollz

I got it right. I felt like I was guessing almost, but I picked the correct square.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 03:44 AM
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originally posted by: ntech
Something I thought I would mention here. Around 20 years ago I had a cataract in my right eye. The eye doctor replaced the lens with an artificial one. Works good but for one interesting problem. In my left normal eye when I look at a black light bar it's actually black with a little purple light around it. The right eye sees the same light bar as a bright purple. And quite a bit of purple light shining from it. I have also noticed that white has a bit of a yellowish cast to it viewing it with the left eye verses the right eye. And colors in the right eye seem a little brighter vs the left one.

Could there have been something that causes the normal lenses to discolor a bit? Or something common back then that caused the lenses of the eyes to discolor and make certain colors invisible? Just a thought.


Natural human lenses filter out UV light in order to protect the retina. The yellowness is due to dead cells discoloring due to UV light. For animals like deer, they don't do that vision filtering and can see using tetrachromatic colour. That lets them see potential predators with an extra range of colour. It's a trade off between risks of blindness and being eaten.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 03:54 AM
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a reply to: justdust

yes. thats the puzzling point. it was like a feeling. maybe somebody decided it was different before i even looked at it and no, it wasnt different. i just followed his decision.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 03:54 AM
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maybe there were no colors.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 04:00 AM
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posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: toms54

Interesting...

I remember reading a fascinating article that says we truly can't describe what a vegetable actually is.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 01:32 PM
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a reply to: toms54




“These hymns, of more than ten thousand lines, are brimming with descriptions of the heavens. Scarcely any subject is evoked more frequently. The sun and reddening dawn’s play of colour, day and night, cloud and lightning, the air and ether, all these are unfolded before us, again and again… but there is one thing no one would ever learn from these ancient songs… and that is that the sky is blue.”


This is fascinating. I have been following this site and they suggest that Saturn was our "original Sun"

So if we received different wavelengths ( as per the following ) its quite possible the sea would be wine red.




saturndeathcult.com...

A Timeless Age in a Purple Haze


Remembered by the most ancient of peoples as the Purple Dawn, this was a distant, ageless past before light entered the world.

Dismissed by modern astrophysicists as an impossible scenario, this configuration between Earth and its primordial star/sun is nonetheless called a ‘polar configuration’. It is diametrically opposed to what we observe today in our current sun’s behaviour which rises and sets east to west. Yet, if we take the ancients at their literal word, a planetary polar configuration with Saturn at the northern top is what they actually saw from their perspective on Earth.

How so?

Based on this ancient perspective we can theorise that the earth rotated on its axis below a star that seems to have exhibited all the characteristics of a brown dwarf star. Both this brown dwarf star and the earth rotated in unison on their axis while drifting through space locked together, thus producing the illusion from Earth’s surface of the brown dwarf star never leaving its position at the earth’s celestial north.






Life under a Polar Sun

Governed by this polar configuration the earth would have been enveloped in this brown dwarf star’s plasma sheath, a giant bubble of plasma that is the equivalent of our current sun’s heliosphere.....


With Earth previously being wrapped in Saturn’s brown dwarf star plasma sheath, all the radiated energy and light being emitted from the brown dwarf would have been uniformly reflected back off the plasma sheath onto Earth. This would have effectively blocked out all other incoming light from other stars and produced a purple-like celestial haze due to the radiation frequencies produced by a brown dwarf star. Hence the ‘purple’ colouring of what is called the Purple Dawn of man’s ancient past.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 01:41 PM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
I would like to imagine that Mexicans know the difference between chicken eggs and male testes.
Juevos.
Same word for two very different things.
To. Too. Two.


And isn't calzone basically meaning underwear?

I've heard this blue didn't exist stuff before and I'm probably too stubborn to accept it as true. I see it as another laurel/ yannie or aphantasia gimmick.

Blue always existed and was distinguishable and that puts the juevos to rest in the calzones for me.



edit on 21-9-2018 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

The Celestial Hunt dates back 25000 plus years. They could see stars.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

I saw something like that on the Electric Universe website.

Search Results for: Saturn



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 02:11 PM
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originally posted by: infolurker
a reply to: Fowlerstoad

the square is just slightly lighter green than the others but it was very difficult to tell the difference and surely not at a glance. more like textured, or has more light lines going through it.


And while I skimmed the OP I noticed the green square on my tiny LG instantly--had to go back and see if it was me or if this square was meant to stick out.

I can throw those macular degeneration tests together in split seconds.

Hard for me to imagine color blindness.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 03:09 PM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

Same here.

ALthough my eyes aren't what they used to be, i see in very rich colors.

I also taste things extraordinarily well. My son is the same, but he also smells things others can't smell. Its hell for him, as everyone has body odor to him, and he's just had to learn to live with it.



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