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DNA results - mixed feelings.

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posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 04:47 AM
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I had mine done too. 68% -Great Britain (60% Cornish and 40% Central) 25%-Europe West 4%- Scandinavian 2% - Finish 1% - Ireland/Scotland/Wales. Was interesting to see the results although not much of a surprise.
edit on 18-9-2018 by SirJohneleth because: formatting




posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 05:41 AM
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a reply to: SirJohneleth

what is cornish? I had thought it was a joke. I mean.. i had thought it was a made up term that came from corn. Like example in sentence:"I am so cornish today"



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 06:06 AM
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a reply to: Damla
Lol, search Cornwall UK.
It is the bottom left sticky out peninsula of England on the map, and a county mostly left alone by invaders of the island over the centuries.



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 06:40 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

why? they were too lazy to walk there or there they didnt have any nice things to invade?
edit on 18-9-2018 by Damla because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 06:45 AM
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a reply to: Damla
Bit rural and apart from tin mining not much to steal. Famous for smuggling as well, still goes on today but mostly drugs and illegal immigration now.
There is a DNA map of the UK available online which shows distinct markers in people of Cornwall. Folk rarely left their own village 100 years ago.



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 06:51 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

very interesting. hmm. I am really intersted in these studies. tin is impoartant. of course. but i must go meet my friends now. see you laterrr.



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 11:41 AM
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originally posted by: halfoldman
The down-side of Vikinghood.

I just realized, I can't cook.

Time to start dating?


Maybe you can't cook, BUT!

You can certainly pillage!

...and sail, fish, discover and conquer new lands...



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 11:51 AM
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originally posted by: halfoldman
That two percent, how did it happen?

Hey brothers, been at sea for weeks, got any women?

Yeah we might.

What did you bring to trade?

I got some iron.

Let's talk.


Knight Templar - That would make sense.

The fought in Israel against the Arabic and were assisted by the Nords in discovering America (and hiding the Ark)



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 12:58 PM
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originally posted by: Damla
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

why? they were too lazy to walk there or there they didnt have any nice things to invade?


Just read your comments and made me laugh



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman


OK I'm mostly Nordic European (surprise)!

Dutch Colonialists in the 17th century no doubt.



But you are related to the people in the Mid-east

I think the trade routes to South Africa went through the Middle East.



2 percent Native American.

The Dutch were pretty active in the New World about the same time as they colonized South Africa.

Back of the envelope calculation indicates you had a full blooded Native American about 7 generations ago. Assuming 25 years per generation = 175 to 200 years ago.

-dex



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: wylekat
a reply to: Subaeruginosa

I have had 6 different DNA tests done in the last 10 years or so. I got my 23&Me test when it was still $500.00. I recently did the Ancestry.com DNA test early this year for $70.00. I've also tested my Mother, her half-sister, my father's half-sister, my ex-wife, and my adopted daughter.

Back when I got my 23&Me test, they made you sign a waiver indicating that you understood you may find out things that you might not want to know. Boy, were they right!

I was also one of those people who grew up in a family where I looked significantly different than my close kin. So, I always had a lingering suspicion that some funny business happened. But, I denied it until I got solid evidence.

I found out that my sire (birth father) was not the same as my father. I found out my mother's sire was not the same as her father. I found out that my daughter's sire was significantly more Northern European that the person that was supposed to be her sire.

Now that DNA testing is more widespread, I've actually found out who sired me and who sired my mother. Turns out that a girl I had a crush on in High School is my Great-Niece!

It's fun to know about your heritage, and about other people you may be related to. Just be prepared!

-dex



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

It's fun to know about your heritage, and about other people you may be related to. Just be prepared!

I'm prepared. Or about as prepared as I can get. Now all I need is the money.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 11:18 AM
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As for myself, my parents only came to South Africa from Germany around 1980 (from the Saar Province in modern Germany, although it has been historically torn between France and Germany).

Although I was culturally raised here from the age of five, I'm not related to any South African ethnicity.

Cornish, is interesting, and like Welsh one of the last Celtic languages.
en.wikipedia.org...

Who was Germanic (and the Vikings were essentially Germanic people from the far northern coasts), and who was Celtic is still a matter of debate.

Some argue that pre-Roman Empire and Arabic expansion "Berber" tribes were once essentially southern renditions of the Germanic tribes who lived in North Africa.

So when people say, blonde, blue eyed people (like St. Augustine, who was a pre-Arab conquest Berber) never lived in Africa before the Banu-Hilal (the Islamic conquest of North Africa and the the former Christian/pagan Middle East), they are are not speaking the truth. There were many tribes, but they intermarried, and were related. The Arab conquest of North Africa only happened in the 11th century.

So when David Icke, for example argued that the Irish Celts were related to people who once dominated Egypt, it is not so far out.

Although modern "Berbers" vary according to locality, these ladies are not much different to me:


edit on 21-9-2018 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 11:53 AM
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How much people from the New World traveled very quickly, just take the story of Squanto.

When the first English settlers arrived in on the coast of the Western Algonquin tribes, Squanto had already been in Spain, possibly North Africa, and traveled all the way home again, only to find his Patuxet tribe extinct.
And that's just one known historical case that was post-Viking.
What happened before that nobody knows.

And even afterwards, there were groups of "exotics" taken to Europe as dancers or attractions.
Not all were slaves, and some chose to stay and married local women, or men.

Then came wars and the continued American military occupation of Germany.
Still today Native American soldiers take part in German pow-wows.
Even Elvis Presley was part Native American, and if somebody like him (a young conscript) had a child in Germany the DNA would be a fraction Native American.
Even Tina Turner, who is married to a German, and she's part Navajo.
So if it's in your DNA, it is very hard to tell which era it comes from.

en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 21-9-2018 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)




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