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Is the sun supposed to appear as a silver/white while not seeing it within our own atmosphere?

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posted on Sep, 15 2018 @ 04:20 PM
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originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: moeron60

It’s white from within our atmosphere too.

Reason why we go with yellow is because of this...



Didn't used to be white.....used to be able to stare at it for up to a full second and it was yellow from ground leve!l

Try that now it'll punch a hold through your head like a welding arc....a big one

ETA: Just in case that wasn’t clear enough. You can’t draw a white sun on white paper. It’s literally that simple.





posted on Sep, 16 2018 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: moeron60

Here's an easy way to tell. Go outside when the sun is out. Is everything tinted yellow?



posted on Sep, 17 2018 @ 03:56 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: moeron60


The color of the image of the Sun is entirely dependent on the filter used and the frequency sensitivity of the media.

The picture posted is most likely a composite because the Sun would be so much brighter than the Earth as to make the image of the Earth nearly invisible.



Don't think so the suns image is overexposed here is a similar image.

Earth Sun

Nikon D2Xs 12mm f16 1/1000 sec iso 800



posted on Sep, 17 2018 @ 11:12 AM
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a reply to: LABTECH767



There will always be those that contest this but back in the 70's the sky did look more blue and the sun more yellow golden in color but the central disc was always too bright to look at directly.


I have to agree, in the 80s/90s and being outside all the time, i remember the sky was definitely bluer, but the grass is just as green as it ever was, and the cloudy days just as grey.

I think the eye loses its ability to see certain wavelengths over time that might account for the blueness colour change, just like hearing loses its ability to hear higher tones with age. Its like time as well, i think it felt like minutes were hours as a kid, but as an adult it feels like hours go by in minutes, time is literally flying by, too fast.



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 03:19 AM
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originally posted by: Moohide
a reply to: LABTECH767



There will always be those that contest this but back in the 70's the sky did look more blue and the sun more yellow golden in color but the central disc was always too bright to look at directly.


I have to agree, in the 80s/90s and being outside all the time, i remember the sky was definitely bluer

Perhaps it's because the air was cleaner back then? Pollution makes the sky more hazy.



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 03:43 AM
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a reply to: moeron60

I remember the sun being more yellow in the 80's, true story...



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 03:56 AM
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Our sun is a dwarf star. Yellow dwarfs are small, main sequence stars. The Sun is a yellow dwarf. A red dwarf is a small, cool, very faint, main sequence star whose surface temperature is under about 4,000 K. Red dwarfs are the most common type of star.

Enchanted Learning Astronomy



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 04:34 AM
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originally posted by: charlyv
Our sun is a dwarf star. Yellow dwarfs are small, main sequence stars. The Sun is a yellow dwarf. A red dwarf is a small, cool, very faint, main sequence star whose surface temperature is under about 4,000 K. Red dwarfs are the most common type of star.

Enchanted Learning Astronomy

The Sun isn't yellow, though. "Yellow dwarf" is a bit of a misnomer. The Sun's surface temperature is almost 6,000 K.

The Sun's color is white when viewed from space or when the Sun is high in the sky. When measuring all the photons emitted, the Sun is actually emitting more photons in the green portion of the spectrum than any other.
www.universetoday.com...
solar-center.stanford.edu...
edit on 18-9-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2018 @ 04:41 AM
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originally posted by: djz3ro
a reply to: moeron60

I remember the sun being more yellow in the 80's, true story...

What does "the sun being more yellow" actually mean? Was the world bathed in yellow light on every sunny day back then? I highly doubt that, since I remember some of the 80s when I was a kid, and I haven't seen or heard anyone talk about yellow sun from that period either.

Seems like some kind of Mandela Effect.

The Sun has always been white, except obviously in the evenings and mornings when it looks yellow due to astmospheric scattering.



posted on Sep, 19 2018 @ 02:29 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: charlyv
Our sun is a dwarf star. Yellow dwarfs are small, main sequence stars. The Sun is a yellow dwarf. A red dwarf is a small, cool, very faint, main sequence star whose surface temperature is under about 4,000 K. Red dwarfs are the most common type of star.

Enchanted Learning Astronomy

The Sun isn't yellow, though. "Yellow dwarf" is a bit of a misnomer. The Sun's surface temperature is almost 6,000 K.

The Sun's color is white when viewed from space or when the Sun is high in the sky. When measuring all the photons emitted, the Sun is actually emitting more photons in the green portion of the spectrum than any other.
www.universetoday.com...
solar-center.stanford.edu...


I am just stating how science categorizes it in the HR diagram. Our atmosphere surely makes it more yellow than it is and the spectrum shows more green, which is strange enough.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 10:32 AM
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originally posted by: charlyv

originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: charlyv
Our sun is a dwarf star. Yellow dwarfs are small, main sequence stars. The Sun is a yellow dwarf. A red dwarf is a small, cool, very faint, main sequence star whose surface temperature is under about 4,000 K. Red dwarfs are the most common type of star.

Enchanted Learning Astronomy

The Sun isn't yellow, though. "Yellow dwarf" is a bit of a misnomer. The Sun's surface temperature is almost 6,000 K.

The Sun's color is white when viewed from space or when the Sun is high in the sky. When measuring all the photons emitted, the Sun is actually emitting more photons in the green portion of the spectrum than any other.
www.universetoday.com...
solar-center.stanford.edu...


I am just stating how science categorizes it in the HR diagram. Our atmosphere surely makes it more yellow than it is and the spectrum shows more green, which is strange enough.

When the sun is high in the sky and we are viewing it through less atmosphere, I think it appears white. It only appears yellow when it is low in the sky and we are seeing it through more atmosphere (and also yellow-orange when it is right on the horizon).



edit on 25/9/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)




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