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The different effects between Earth and Sun comet/meteor strikes

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posted on Sep, 15 2018 @ 09:50 AM
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The different effects between Earth and Sun comet/meteor strikes



I had to put this thread in “Space Exploration” but it’s just a Chit /Chat, without value, because my new life is less than 2 months away

The Carrington event made us aware of the dangers to a possible solar outburst. Articles are still appearing regularly for some years now telling us about the dangers to electrical grids, therefore electrical and electronic equipment, banking systems, etc that are going to put us in chaos.

The end of the Younger Dryas: (Sun comet)
At the end of the Younger Dryas there was an event that flushed the Earth with an enormous amount of heat in the blink of an eye. After revisiting the Dr. Robert Schoch video Solar Outbursts and Cycles of Civilization - Earth Rhythm I’m convinced that there is no other explanation but a solar outburst. Because the scale of this event however does not fit a normal bad tempered Sun with Carrington type event. (Who Knows?)



Thinking Back:
Who remember or have seen one of NASA’s 4km comets hitting the Sun on the 2nd of October 2011. I got the original unedited version from a .mil site but see it’s currently available on YouTube. I always wondered what if Earth was on the receiving side of that blow-out.



Then look at the Neat-comet in February 2003. Nothing stands a chance against a monster like that, just look at the ice or oceans burning away. Maybe there is/was a Planet-X and the doom prophets just had their date and trajectory wrong. Jupiter looks like a dwarf,



The onset of the Younger Dryas: (Earth comet)[/color=teal]
Although I support the fragmented comet hypothesis in Earths northern hemisphere, I do have a problem with my link to the well researched article I use in my 100 000 years cycle upgrade thread “Article” – “Thread” My problem is that I associate a comet/meteor strike with heat and not with flash freezing. OK it fell on thick ice at an angle but I still do not feel comfortable. Maybe one of my fellow ATS members can give me a better insight than the picture in my head. How can we have the heat and flash freezing at the same time? Or maybe the flash freezing occurred in the area before the impact point and the heat - at and after the direction of trajectory. Then again how big was the part the ice played in the spreading of the heat? I still believe this internet thing is

And we think we know. Logic can however never be ignored even by science.

Thanx to the internet, Graham Hancock and friends. Also do not throw others like Michael Cremo, etc away.

Cheers

The chance of me dying at an old age is better than excellent, but it’s always better to be prepared. I’m just a retiring but not you’re typical “Pepper” because I live on my own due to the incapability to trust, which in turn protects me from the evil and #ed-up people trying to take advantage.


Still busy, getting there
edit on 1C182018-09-15T10:26:49-05:00SaturdayAmerica/Chicago2 by ICycle2 because: (no reason given)
extra DIV




posted on Sep, 15 2018 @ 10:13 AM
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So it's been a while, sorry for the mistakes. Wrong button and now I cannot edit even with time available. Maybe South African internet. I cannot fix my mistakes anymore. At least you should be able to get the miyn "Space Exploration point"
edit on 1C182018-09-15T10:39:28-05:00SaturdayAmerica/Chicago2 by ICycle2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 15 2018 @ 10:57 AM
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100 00 year thread


www.sott.net...

What an f-up.
edit on 1C182018-09-15T11:01:11-05:00SaturdayAmerica/Chicago2 by ICycle2 because: My uwn faults + some unexpeted changes



posted on Sep, 15 2018 @ 11:06 AM
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Now my edit button works again. Think I got mixed up between pages. Not going to try and fix anything anymore



posted on Sep, 15 2018 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: ICycle2

S&F

Big concern of mine too.

As far as the freezing goes, here's a really good explanation....
Flash Frozen Mammoths

-Driver



posted on Sep, 15 2018 @ 12:29 PM
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That is the one I used in my 100 000 year cycle upgrade. I even tried to open a new page link to it. My internet sucks tonight, I posted corrections for my my mistakes and gave up. I even open a extra page to read and fix the changes on ATS, it was so slow that I gave up.
But at least members interested in this type of information will accept my flaws



posted on Sep, 15 2018 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: ICycle2

I wouldn't worry too much about everything being exactly perfect IMO you are clearly putting allot of work and thought into your threads and filling them with great thought provoking content. Just my 2 cents.

On topic, I had wondered about the effects to solar impacts before but never realized there was a video.
This is scarey stuff man. Thank you for sharing



posted on Sep, 15 2018 @ 01:06 PM
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a reply to: Z32Driver

It was meant to be factual, not scary
edit on 1C182018-09-15T13:09:21-05:00SaturdayAmerica/Chicago2 by ICycle2 because: Internet still slow but this one was my mistake



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: ICycle2
Interesting thread for sure. I like Robert Schoch but even though he may be a good geologist, a plasma physicist or astronomer he is not. There is a tremendous amount of material from several fields of science that must be put together in order for his CME theory to be taken seriously, not to mention all the data that has yet to be collected. Talk about an uphill battle! Science still has yet to understand the affects of solar activity on the planets in our solar system let alone the introduction of an outside object like a comet.

What affects do comets have on our Sun? I think the scientific consensus is next to nothing but is this accurate?
Are comets made of ice, i.e. dirty snowballs that originated from the outer solar system?
Data from the few comets spacecraft have visited show that they are devoid of water, on the surface at least. Perhaps there is water ice below but I'm not holding my breath.
Samples collected from comet Wild2 show an inner solar system origin. Is it possible that the affects seen from comets, coma and tails, could be due to an interaction between the comet nuclei and the Sun's electrically charged particles? More data is needed!

Anthony Peratt is a great source for understand cosmic plasma.
PLASMA UNIVERSE
Peratt's book, "Physics of the Plasma Universe", is also a great read for understanding plasma.

Hannes Alfven also has some information, albeit rather conservative, in his book, "Evolution of the Solar System", which has helped me understand the accretion solar formation. Plasma must have been involved.
Another great book by Alfven, and much smaller, is, "Cosmic Plasma'. Much of the information in those books seems to go almost completely ignored by astronomers today. Gravity is not the only driving force that has shaped our cosmos, plasma is also involved and very much so.

99.99% of the Universe is in a state of plasma so in order to properly understand the Universe one must have an understanding of plasma.



posted on Sep, 21 2018 @ 05:21 PM
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originally posted by: Devino
a reply to: ICycle2
Are comets made of ice, i.e. dirty snowballs that originated from the outer solar system?
Data from the few comets spacecraft have visited show that they are devoid of water, on the surface at least. Perhaps there is water ice below but I'm not holding my breath.

Comets are conglomerates of rocks and frozen volatiles ("ices"). When their orbit takes them closer to the Sun, the outgassing results in formation of rubble mantle, which is why the comets we've explored look rocky on the surface.



posted on Sep, 22 2018 @ 12:26 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: Devino
a reply to: ICycle2
Are comets made of ice, i.e. dirty snowballs that originated from the outer solar system?
Data from the few comets spacecraft have visited show that they are devoid of water, on the surface at least. Perhaps there is water ice below but I'm not holding my breath.

Comets are conglomerates of rocks and frozen volatiles ("ices"). When their orbit takes them closer to the Sun, the outgassing results in formation of rubble mantle, which is why the comets we've explored look rocky on the surface.

Is it out gassing due to heat or ionization due to the solar wind. I would suggest it's a bit of both yet we generally don't hear much about comet ionization.

Is it possible that H2O observed in a comet's tail through spectroscopy could be due to the liberation of oxygen by way of ionization of rock, like granite that is rich in oxygen, and then mixed with hydrogen ions from the Sun or even combine into hydroxyls or water?

I was told that by way of spectroscopy astronomers could discern between elemental H and O and water. I assume this would also work for OH and H2O yet I wonder if the question even comes up. Are they even considering the possibility of O production through ionization? I have to confess that I haven't looked much into this question.

Could this observed rubble pile and sand be due to the disaggregation of rock from ionization as well as the sublimation of frozen gasses?

We need more data! A sample from the surface and core would be nice.

This is one reason that I eagerly await the return of the Japanese probe from asteroid Ryugu. I appreciate your updates from the thread here; Japanese probe approaches weird-looking asteroid



posted on Sep, 22 2018 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: Devino
The solar wind includes an equal number of electrons and protons (hydrogen nuclei), so overall it's electrically neutral. Ionisation happens due to the UV radiation from the Sun, not due to the solar wind.
edit on 22-9-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2018 @ 08:30 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
a reply to: Devino
The solar wind includes an equal number of electrons and protons (hydrogen nuclei), so overall it's electrically neutral. Ionisation happens due to the UV radiation from the Sun, not due to the solar wind.
I don't mean charge separation. I am referring to the interaction of atoms on comets with collisions of charged particles in the solar wind. Charged particles from the Sun do ionize atoms and molecules on comets.
Spectra of cometary X rays induced by solar wind ions



It is the constant battle fought between the comet and the solar wind that helps to sculpt the comet’s ion tail. Rosetta’s instruments are monitoring the fine detail of this process.
esa.int


The water ions themselves originate in the coma, the atmosphere of the comet. They are placed there originally by heat from the Sun liberating the molecules from the surface ice. Once in gaseous form, the collision of extreme ultraviolet light displaces electrons from the molecules, turning them into ions. Colliding particles from the solar wind can do this as well.
I was looking for some insight here. Photoionization occurs in the comet's atmosphere and outside the bow shock. Due to the extreme difference in mass between a photon and an ion do these much heavier charged particles make it to the comets surface?

Most of the sputtered atoms come from the winter side of the comet. Although this is the hemisphere that is mostly facing away from the Sun at present, solar wind particles can end up striking the surface because they are deflected during interactions with ions in the comet’s coma.
I guess this answers my question.

Are we sure that the jetting material in images like this are due to sublimating ice rather than ionization? Could it be a little of both?



posted on Sep, 23 2018 @ 09:33 AM
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originally posted by: Devino
Are we sure that the jetting material in images like this are due to sublimating ice rather than ionization? Could it be a little of both?

Does ionisation produce the jetting, or did the material have to be ejected for ionised coma to appear?

Many short-period comets share the same region of space as asteroids, and so receive the same amount of ionisation as them. And yet asteroids don't have a coma or a tail. So there's something about the composition of comets that's different from asteroids.

Molecular Nitrogen has recently been detected at the comet 67P, and this points to #1 formation in the very early days of the Solar System (while it was still forming), and #2 very cold origins, on the outskirts of the Solar System. www.esa.int...
edit on 23-9-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2018 @ 12:16 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
Does ionisation produce the jetting, or did the material have to be ejected for ionised coma to appear?
That's a great question and one I have not been able to answer. From what I have read the ionization process is quite complicated and difficult to measure due to the dynamic nature of the plasma instabilities. The probes on the Rosetta mission, for example, are in the wrong position to take readings of these instabilities. However there seems to be a lot going on here. I would think it's a little of both sublimation and ionization which would help explain many odd looking features.


Other interesting observations concern electrically charged nanograins in the inner coma, indicating a possible connection between dust at the surface of the nucleus and the comet's plasma environment [53]. Aeolian ripples (figure 20) on the surface of the nucleus of 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko [54] may be another hint of a pronounced impact of the plasma environment on the nucleus morphology.



The ripples observed exhibit a wavelength of about 10 m, which is comparable to the wavelength of ion acoustic waves in that environment [55]. Such ‘plasmaeolian’ structures would demonstrate the importance of a deeper understanding of the cometary plasma environment, if the conjectured relation can be confirmed.

Interaction of the solar wind with comets: a Rosetta perspective


Many short-period comets share the same region of space as asteroids, and so receive the same amount of ionisation as them. And yet asteroids don't have a coma or a tail. So there's something about the composition of comets that's different from asteroids.
Remember the samples brought back from comet Wild2 from the stardust mission? These samples showed a hot, inner solar system origin.
A Hot Origin for Icy Comets
The distinction between asteroids and comets after that was skewed a bit. I would've argued that the difference, other than a tail and/or coma, was their orbits. That was until this asteroid appeared.
The First Interstellar Object to Visit Us Is More Incredible Than We Ever Expected
That asteroid has a highly elliptical (actually hyperbolic) orbit yet no coma or tail. I think you're correct in that orbital trajectories are not the defining factor between the two, so composition must play a role. Perhaps the reality is both play a role and, as with everything else so far, the answers are more complicated than we thought.
edit on 9/23/2018 by Devino because: (no reason given)




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