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WAR: Chabali Withdraws; Shiites Put Al-Jaafari On Ticket

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posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 09:06 AM
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Ahmad Chalabi withdrew from Iraq's election race to replace the interim leadership, and Interim Vice President Ibrahim al-Jaafari was chosen to run. A Shiite party spokesman said Chalabi withdrew under pressure from the Iraqi United Alliance. al-Jaafari is a conservative cleric. Chalabi is best known for his early ties to Washington.


 



www.kirotv.com
Interim Vice President Ibrahim al-Jaafari was chosen after Ahmad Chalabi withdrew.

A spokesman for an umbrella group for 38 Shiite parties said Chalabi withdrew from the race under pressure from the Iraqi United Alliance, which won the most seats in the National Assembly in the Jan. 30 election.

Chalabi is a secular Shiite once known for his ties to Washington, and al-Jaafari is a conservative sometimes referred to as a cleric in a business suit.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Some pundits have suggested that Chabali maintained his ties to Washington, and appearances of disagreement were simply smoke, mirrors and negotiation. In any event, he's now out of the race.

It will be interesting to learn what Iraq's version of democracy will turn out to be.




posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 09:14 AM
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Originally posted by soficrow

It will be interesting to learn what Iraq's version of democracy will turn out to be.


Democracy in Iraq as per the Shiite vision equals Theocracy per the American view. Chalabi was an installed puppet and the Iraqi people know it. They want to make their own decesions about their country without interference from American opinion.



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 09:21 AM
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I tell you what Chalabi is not finish yet he has greedy plans for Iraq, and he considers himself the one that borough the US to Iraq under lies false evidence to take Saddam so he could get his wish.

I is not over, he has ambitions and he wanted US big money profiting companies in Iraq to privatized the oil so he can become wealthy.

He will stir some trouble to the new government.



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 09:28 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043

He will stir some trouble to the new government.


Of that I have no doubt. I can see Chalabi curtailing his agenda from the private sector. I think he has more of a connection to Washington than anyone realizes. I also dont think Washington wanted him to step down, but he was forced to either step down or make the US show their hand. And that is not going to happen.



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 10:23 AM
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Kidfinger

Exactly, kidfinger, exactly he was under scrutiny from Washington and that the CIA ransack his offices in Baghdad but still he was free to go as wish, so I don't get it.

I think he is still the one that US will used if things in Iraq does not goes the American way.

[edit on 23-2-2005 by marg6043]



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 10:55 AM
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The Iranians are calling the shots now. According to the New York Times:

“alliance leaders had consulted with Iran's ruling ayatollahs, and had been told that Dr. Allawi, a secular Shiite with close ties to the United States that go back at least 15 years, would not be acceptable to Iran as prime minister in the new transitional government.”

The alliance in question is the one that just won the elections.

I guess things are not working out as planned…




source



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043

I think he is still the one that US will used if things in Iraq does not goes the American way.





Iraq is pretty much conquered, financially and economically. Vajrayana posted a great link on A Military-Governmental-Industrial Conspiracy? - on page 10.


Here's some research from the article (Note: Neil Bush and Carlyle are key players):



"before the fires from the “shock and awe” military onslaught were even extinguished, Bremer unleashed his shock therapy, pushing through more wrenching changes in one sweltering summer than the International Monetary Fund has managed to enact over three decades in Latin America.”



In his first major act on the job, Bremer "fired 500,000 state workers, most of them soldiers, but also doctors, nurses, teachers, publishers, and printers. Next, he flung open the country’s borders to absolutely unrestricted imports: no tariffs, no duties, no inspections, no taxes. Iraq, Bremer declared was “open for business,”



Before the war, Iraq’s non-oil-related economy consisted of 200 state-owned companies, that produced everything from cement to paper to washing machines. In June, Bremer attended an economic summit in Jordan and announced that the firms would be privatized immediately. “Getting inefficient state enterprises into private hands,” he said, “is essential for Iraq’s economic recovery,"



n September, to entice investors to buy the state-owned companies, Bremer enacted a new set of laws. For example, Order 37 lowered Iraq’s corporate tax rate from roughly 40% to a flat 15%. Order 39 allowed foreign companies to own 100% of Iraqi assets outside of the natural-resource sector.

Investors could take 100% of the profits they made in Iraq out of the country. They would not be required to reinvest and would not be taxed. Under Order 39, they could sign leases and contracts that would last for forty years. Order 40 welcomed foreign banks to Iraq under the same favorable terms



"Iraqis, reeling from violence both military and economic, were far too busy staying alive to mount a political response to Bremer’s campaign. Worrying about the privatization of the sewage system was an unimaginable luxury with half the population lacking access to clean drinking water; the debate over the flat tax would have to wait until the lights were back on,"



The Economist described Iraq under Bremer as “a capitalist dream,” and a flurry of new consulting firms were launched promising to help companies get access to the Iraqi market, their boards of directors stacked with well-connected Republicans,



the most prominent was New Bridge and it was absolutely jubilant over the potential opportunities in Iraq. “Getting the rights to distribute Procter & Gamble products can be a gold mine,” one of the company’s partners enthused. “One well-stocked 7-Eleven could knock out thirty Iraqi stores; a Wal-Mart could take over the country,”



But don't worry about old Joe. Things may not have went as planned in Iraq, but he's branching out and finding other ways to cash in on the war. According to the Sept 30, 2004 Fairfield County Weekly, Allbaugh started yet another consulting company with Andrew Lundquist, the former director of Dick Cheney's secretive energy policy task force. The firm's first client? Lockheed Martin, one of the country's largest defense contractors.


Source



....Pretty astounding, huh? And like Pringle says, Iraq was ripped apart and divvied up faster in one summer than Latin America has been in 3 decades.



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posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 12:22 PM
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Sofi


Like Marvin Gaye sang "Don't it make you wanna holler".



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 01:57 PM
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Was This "Plan A" Or "Plan B"?

A lot of suspicion surrounds Chalabi, as well it should. It's interesting that he got that far and then got the rug pulled out from under him.

Or did he?

Chalabi is very good at taking care of Chalabi. Whether he holds a formal post or not, he's going to be a major player in Iraq.

That is, if nobody kills him first. From what I can tell, there is no shortage of people who would like to see that happen.

I don't particularly care for the guy, but I find myself hoping that he at least doesn't come to a violent end.



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by Majic

I don't particularly care for the guy, but I find myself hoping that he at least doesn't come to a violent end.



I agree with you on this one, but for some reason Chalabi useful purpose has not come to an end just yet.



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 02:08 PM
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Originally posted by Majic


That is, if nobody kills him first. From what I can tell, there is no shortage of people who would like to see that happen.



This is a big problem not just for Chabali, but for every member of their governing body. Every person in that panel of officials is being targeted by one group or another. There is no way to determine whos niece, uncle or sister is going to get kidnapped next for ransom or some other demand. To be a member of this governing body is to put your name on the official list of There is someone else for us to exploit to their fullest potential list. Not a position I'd want to be holding at this point in Iraqi history.



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 02:26 PM
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as posted by soficrow
Chalabi is best known for his early ties to Washington.


Excellent point.
He is also the "insider" who was feeding the CIA with supposed intelligence on Saddam's WMDs, also. To boot, he has very, very close ties to Iran.





seekerof



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by Majic
Was This "Plan A" Or "Plan B"?

A lot of suspicion surrounds Chalabi, as well it should. It's interesting that he got that far and then got the rug pulled out from under him.

Or did he?

Chalabi is very good at taking care of Chalabi. Whether he holds a formal post or not, he's going to be a major player in Iraq.






Looks like we're all in agreement on this one. Yea team.


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