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TheRedneck needs some love...

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posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 06:30 AM
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Just wanted to give everyone an update... been a while now.

According to the doc, I'm doing fine. I'm already down to two medicines: a full-strength aspirin every morning and a heavy statin every evening. I can eat pretty much what I want, as long as the grease is kept to a minimum. Even salt!

They originally had me on carvedilol for blood pressure. Now, I have lived my entire life (well, since they invented blood pressure anyway) with a BP that was on the high side and a very fast heart rate. Since the surgery, my BP is running low, which is why they took me off the beta blocker so fast. My 'normal' reading now is around 105/70 (heart rate is still in the 90s though). As long as it stays below 120/90, excluding anomalous readings, I'm not on any BP medicine. So the salt isn't hurting me... I actually ate a handful of salt at one point because my BP was getting dangerously low.

Back on Mountain Dew for the same reason... gotta keep some BP. Caffeine is good at that.

The statin might be for life... after all, the first inkling of this problem was back when my triglycerides were over 500. They seem to consider that high.

Of course, I'm on a strict weight limit (5 pounds) for another week; then it goes to 10 for two more weeks until my second doctor's visit. After that, if things go well, he'll likely release me to "activity as tolerated." That'll be a good thing.

I tried to go do some work in my shop shortly after getting home. It didn't go as expected. A lot of what I work with is weighed in milligrams, so I figured maybe I could get some of the lighter work done, like some soldering or Arduino programming. So here I go (my wife in tow with a folding chair just in case, lol) out to the shop to try a little programming. I get there and get everything set up to reprogram and run a test; all I need is the micro-USB cable to plug in the Arduino. A cable doesn't weigh 5 pounds, so no problem, right? So I grab one end of the cable, and the other end has wrapped itself around the chair leg. So what do I start to do? Raise up and lift the chair, which does weigh more than 5 pounds! My mind was fixed on the cable, not the chair.

I stopped myself before I tried to pop those zip-ties, but between the aggravation of the stitches and that little almost catastrophe, I decided the shop was pretty much off limits for a while. I've still gone out there and just sat for a while to stave off the stir-craziness, but no actual work. Instead, I sit in my recliner and watch TV, peck on this silly hunk of dirty silicone, get up and walk as much as I can, and sleep... a LOT of sleep!

Incidentally, that means that I also drop conversations on here at times and just knock out for a while... sometimes almost an entire day. So if that happened to you, please forgive me... my body knows what it needs, and I don't feel like arguing with it.

On a high note, I am already seeing a massive difference in my ability to get muscle tone back. Just not in my upper body until that can heal. The foot-long incision down my chest is healing over great (looks like only a very mild scar will be left), and that fugly-looking incision on the side of my knee (where they got the vein) is looking like a normal scar now. The small incision on my ankle is almost healed, but hurts like the dickens... mainly because the side of my calf is now numb. No idea if the feeling will come back in it or not; doc said it was a toss-up.

All in all, it's been quite the experience. I was lucky to have one of the best heart centers in the nation within 50 miles of me, but even luckier to have the prayers and good wishes of people on here. You guys ALL rock, regardless of our differences and/or similarities.

TheRedneck




posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 06:52 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

When your condition is stable and the healing process is close to fully complete, and assuming you still have a numb calf, you could do worse than getting hold of some Lion's Mane mushroom supplements. They have been known to have positive effects where nerve regeneration is concerned. Best of luck in the healing process more generally though!



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 07:31 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

That's interesting... every time I think I have seen every supplement known to mankind, I stumble across a dozen more. I have never heard of Lion's Mane.

A quick search shows it might be beneficial, though, and like most supplements is very easy on the potential side effects. Thanks for the tip!

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 09:27 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

A buddy of mine who has some nerve damage related to a herniated disc in his spine, uses them as a nootropic or part of a nootropic stack, but one of their other benefits, aside from the increased cognitive function, is that he has been using his implant (a small device which interferes with the signals from the damaged nerve) less and less as he continues to use the supplement, leading him to suspect that he has had at least some healing in the nerve itself.

Prior to the implant he was immobile and often in such pain as to quite unman him. After the implant he was very much improved, but there was still a background hum of brokenness. These days he seems substantially more able to relax his back, and thats only come on since the supplements have had time to start building up in his system, so we are thinking its related.



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Take it easy Redneck, I've only ever had a hernia operation but I was in the prime of my life (late teens) I did more damage by wanting to be active and you just can't. Even with great care you'll start doing stuff intuitively and next thing you know something's popped or began leaking.

Take it easy

All the best.



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 11:47 AM
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Good to hear that you’re on the fast-track to mending, Red!

Hardest part for me, post-surgery was getting out of bed without using my hands and arms due the lifting restrictions.

Somehow I still managed to pop some of my “zip-ties”, and needed “re-stabilization” surgery a year after the original knifing. They opened me up again, cut the remaining wires, re-split my sternum, and then bolted the two halves together with titanium plates.

I tell kids I’m a dollar store Superman!


I still have some numbness near the “harvest site” at my ankle and it’s been almost 6 years now. No biggie.

Keep getting better!
edit on 2-10-2018 by Bhadhidar because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 01:02 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
I'm on a cell right now, but I'll have my laptop back tomorrow. In the meantime... I have 4 broke ribs, I am unable to eat, I need a cigarette, and the doctors think I'm crazy. In other words, I'm fine.

Turned out to be a quintuple bypass.

TheRedneck


Did they use the paddles? You havent had real heart issues until they use the paddles. When they use the paddles get back to me and we can discuss life... death.... life...

But without a common frame of reference it wouldnt work




[

McCoy: Perhaps, we could cover a little philosophical ground. Life

[pause]

McCoy: Death

[pause]

McCoy: Life.

[pause]

McCoy: Things of that nature.

Spock: I did not have time on Vulcan to review the philosophical disciplines.

McCoy: C'mon, Spock, it's me, McCoy. You really have gone where no man's gone before. Can't you tell me what it felt like?

Spock: It would be impossible to discuss the subject without a common frame-of-reference.

McCoy: You're joking!

Spock: A joke

[pause]

Spock: is a story with a humorous climax.

McCoy: You mean I have to die to discuss your insights on death?

Spock: Forgive me, Doctor. I am receiving a number of distress calls.

McCoy: I don't doubt it.



Glad your with with us.



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

Yeah, it's that intuitive part that's kept me idle; the shop trip showed me just how easy that is to mess up on. The nurses explained the two issues they did NOT want to see: popping a zip-tie or wire, and infection. The first one is a major operation to fix, assuming it can be fixed (I think it depends on the severity), and the latter is a three month stay in the hospital with a 50-50 chance of survival.

The first worry is also why I can't drive. An air bag deployment in the wrong position and I'm room temperature. But, I figure it's been almost a month now, and just over two weeks until I can start slowly doing again... not the end of the world.

So, I'm just going stir crazy and letting the wife handle the sterilization.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: Bhadhidar

I had a LOT of trouble getting up by myself at first and I still have to watch how far down I get. Just the other day I was watching my wife do something in the yard and forgot to get a chair... sat all the way down on the porch, and when it came time to get up... whoops! She literally had to dead lift me until I could get a foot under me.

The first time I was able to get out of bed unassisted was a big deal for me. Took several tries swinging my legs, but I managed.

The last time I went to the doc I got to see the x-rays post-surgery. Wires and the metallic heads of those zip ties showed up all over the place. Still, I think that would be preferable to the plate.

Three more days... just three more damn days and I get to lift a gallon of milk. Damnation, there's something bad wrong with that statement!

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

I don't know if they did... I was on a heart-lung machine (read: dead on life support) while they did their sewing lessons. I tell you, though, I don't think the paddles could be much worse than being split open. Waking up and looking down to see that big scar, tubes coming out of my stomach, and feeling the implant in the side of my neck was pretty stressful! I felt less like Jean-Luc and more like Locutus then than I ever wanted to.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck


Three more days... just three more damn days and I get to lift a gallon of milk. Damnation, there's something bad wrong with that statement!


Hey, in no time at all, you'll be benching two milk gallons!

I know it's tough for a can-do guy like you to restrain yourself. Just stay the course, my Redneck friend. You'll soon be whole and well, and this time, you'll be fully bionic. Oh......... what??? You didn't get the upgrade??



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 03:46 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

You’re right, there is something wrong with that statement.

I’d work my way up to that gallon of milk by starting with something more manageable,

Like a fifth of good scotch.

Baby steps!

(BTW: With all the hardware in me (plates, rod, pins, and screws, not all from the CABG surgery of course) I sometimes feel more like Data myself)



posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 02:43 AM
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a reply to: Bhadhidar

The trick is in combining the milk fat with the alcohol. Bailey's Irish Cream...



posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: argentus

Oh, I'm hanging in there... just not a bit of fun. Heck, I can't even watch documentaries any more, because they make me want to test out the new idea they just gave me!

Two. More. Weeks.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: Bhadhidar

I prefer to use the cumulative approach to weight lifting... as in 12 ounces (of PBR) at a time.

Or, there's always vodka...

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 3 2018 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: Bhadhidar


Somehow I still managed to pop some of my “zip-ties”, and needed “re-stabilization” surgery a year after the original knifing.

Just curious... did you know when it happened? What did it feel like?

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 05:05 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Xcathdra

I don't know if they did... I was on a heart-lung machine (read: dead on life support) while they did their sewing lessons. I tell you, though, I don't think the paddles could be much worse than being split open. Waking up and looking down to see that big scar, tubes coming out of my stomach, and feeling the implant in the side of my neck was pretty stressful! I felt less like Jean-Luc and more like Locutus then than I ever wanted to.

TheRedneck


Weirdly enough you dont really "feel" the shock in terms of pain. It is a weird sensation though and one that confused doctors since I could tell them what they were doing when I "died" in the ER. My issue was a clot that traveled from my leg to my heart. By all medical reasoning I should not have survived it. I happened to be in the ER when the attack hit and the head of their cardiology department just happened to be one floor up. Not only did they save my life but because of where I was and where the doctor was I miraculously suffered no adverse issue with the shape of my heart (a heart attack can deform the heart causing more issues). I am counted in the minority on surviving whats refereed to as a widow-maker heart attack.

They say when a widow maker hits a person has from minutes up to an hour before death. Mine was minutes.

2 possible takeaways -
1 - The circumstances of being in the right place at the right time saved me.
or
2 - God hit the smite button and simply forgot to correct for wind.

Either way my soul purpose in life is to serve as nothing more than a warning to others.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:54 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Bhadhidar


Somehow I still managed to pop some of my “zip-ties”, and needed “re-stabilization” surgery a year after the original knifing.

Just curious... did you know when it happened? What did it feel like?

TheRedneck


No, I can’t say that I ever felt any of the wires actually break, so I don’t know when, or how it happened.

There were one or two times that I sneezed pretty hard a week or two just after surgery, and by pretty hard I’m talking “part the Red Sea so the Israelites can cross” hard, when it might have happened.

The pain that followed those sneezes was truly epic; the stars circling in my vision would have been dazzling if the tears didn’t make them so hard to see!

My only clue that something was not right was that long after everything should have been healed, I’d feel a (non-painful) “clicking” in the lower part of the sternum whenever I’d cough or sneeze.

Surgeon said that, due to my build (I’m rather broad-chested: father was a boxer, mom caught dad’s eye by “entering the room before she entered the room” if you get my drift), I had likely popped the wires before the bone had a chance to knit.

But, all fixed now, and virtually bulletproof!
edit on 4-10-2018 by Bhadhidar because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

I know about blood clots... that's what took my Dad down. In his case, it wasn't the heart, but the brain. It took two surgeries to remove the clot; they gave him a 50-50 chance of surviving the first one, and gave no odds the second time.

Somehow he survived ten years to the day from his stroke. In the end, I think he wanted to go... his body never recovered from the surgery and he was bedridden. His mind was still there, but he couldn't reach out from that broken body. He got to see the two things he always wanted to see in life: me marry and my sister graduate school.

Just realized I come from some pretty tough stock... he survived those ten years, and Mom died recently after a 30-year battle with scleroderma. I have been told that normally kills in 5 years; I know that's about how long it took for my aunt to lose to it. Heck, a full year before Mom died, one of her doctors pulled me to the side and said she had weeks at the most.

Anyway, glad to hear you picked a good time to have that widow-maker... we don't always agree, but I like reading your posts.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: Bhadhidar

Thankfully I haven't sneezed that hard... coughing has been my issue. Did you know that coughing becomes painful with 4 broke ribs? Who'da thunk it?

I have an issue with post-nasal drip, but so far I've been able to control it mentally to some degree (the cough, not the drip). Sleeping in a more upright position seems to help too.

Thanks for the response... I'll admit to being a little worried about popping something before the bone can heal. That sternum is pretty much the kingpin that holds the entire chest together, and I have a natural tendency to take a lick and keep going, be that lick in the back, chest, head, wherever. Popping those wires and zips by being me has always stood out as a very good probability. But so far, there's been no popping, so apparently I've been a good enough redneck.

TheRedneck







 
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