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Hurricane Florence could be heading for the East Coast—but she’s a tough storm to track

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posted on Sep, 6 2018 @ 05:57 PM
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She is coming, but like most hurricanes I have been through and track, is hard to determine at this early phase.

I was born and lived a good portion of my life close or on the Carolina coast. I have family down there, including my 20 year old daughter.

One of the reasons I left South Carolina was because of anxiety caused by dealing with hurricanes.

Just keeping an eye on this girl and hope my worrying is for nothing.

Stay safe !



Hurricane Florence could come close to the United States next week—but for now, its path is highly uncertain. The hurricane is meandering into a complicated environment that makes it tougher than usual for meteorologists to figure out where the storm will go. While it’s still unknown whether the storm will affect the United States, residents along the East Coast have about a week to get ready just in case it turns toward land.

Florence is halfway across the Atlantic Ocean as of Thursday afternoon, swirling more than 2,000 miles from where it sprang to life off the western coast of Africa one week ago. The storm brought foul weather to the Cabo Verde Islands as it crossed into a more favorable environment for strengthening. It defied the odds on Wednesday to briefly balloon into a picture-perfect category four hurricane in the central Atlantic, strengthening far beyond what forecasters expected. The storm managed to insulate itself from surrounding dry air and strong winds that would otherwise have hindered its growth. Wind shear took its toll, though, and the storm has since lost some of its thunder.

Despite its shaggy appearance on Thursday afternoon, Florence is still a hurricane, and it should win-out against subsiding wind shear over the next couple of days. The latest forecast from the National Hurricane Center shows Florence regaining major hurricane status (category 3 or higher) as wind shear subsides and the storm approaches Bermuda early next week. What happens after it clears Bermuda, however, is still a bit of a mystery.


www.popsci.com...-3
edit on 6-9-2018 by Groot because: (no reason given)

edit on Thu Sep 6 2018 by DontTreadOnMe because: Paragraphs added!!!

edit on Thu Sep 6 2018 by DontTreadOnMe because: trimmed overly long quote AND added tags IMPORTANT: Using Content From Other Websites on ATS




posted on Sep, 6 2018 @ 06:00 PM
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a reply to: Groot



posted on Sep, 6 2018 @ 06:07 PM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
a reply to: Groot



Exactly !

LOL !

I use to track those tropical waves coming off the coast of Africa for nothing. I evacuated 1 time for a hurricane because it was looking really bad, all for nothing.

That's why I moved to Kentucky.





posted on Sep, 6 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
a reply to: Groot

As a life time resident of the east coast of Florida I got a special kick out of that ^^^^!



posted on Sep, 6 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: Groot

Whenever they hurricanes are coming for the FL peninsula, the upheaval from everyone going out of their minds tends to be more 'destructive' than the actual hurricane aftermath.




posted on Sep, 6 2018 @ 06:18 PM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
a reply to: Groot

Whenever they hurricanes are coming for the FL peninsula, the upheaval from everyone going out of their minds tends to be more 'destructive' than the actual hurricane aftermath.



Yep, I can agree on that. Empty shelves, gas stations out of gas, while in the mean time I had already stocked up on beer watching the neighbors board up they're houses. That one time I evacuated, had a 1 year old daughter and the wife at the time was freaking out. So , later , after a 10 hour trip to my parents in central South Carolina that was 100 miles away, I said screw this.



posted on Sep, 7 2018 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: IgnoranceIsntBlisss

It is not the natives of Florida like myself who have been through several, it is the new comers(Florida's population is growing fast) that freak out. The media hype does not help the situation.

Florence is looking like more of a threat to the Central Atlantic. It would take an unprecedented track for it to beva threat to Florida. Weather stations have been launching more weather balloons to get more information to improve the forecast models.

It looks like a potential landfall will be as early as Wednesday/Thursday.

The National Hurricane Center is the go to spot for the latest forecast and updates.

www.nhc.noaa.gov...

edit on 7-9-2018 by jrod because: H



posted on Sep, 8 2018 @ 04:59 AM
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Still a bit too early to know... next Thurs/Fri we will know more. But at this pt it could strike anywhere from Florida coast up to New England. The cone of possibilities is just too soon to tell right now.

It wouldn't be a bad thing to start preparing now for those in the hurricane prone areas. That way not everyone is prepping last minute once the officials have a better handle on where it will go.

Areas that are majorly impacted by hurricanes each year (in the hurricane zone) should have a hurricane supply tax break day/week just like they do for school supplies each year now. That way folks prepare for non perishable essentials early instead of bombarding the stores last minute creating a supply chain nightmare in that area.

leolady



posted on Sep, 9 2018 @ 03:07 PM
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Any chance Florence will hit Florence in South Carolina?



posted on Sep, 9 2018 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: Hellmutt

it has been predicted by windy.com to hit north Carolina, but who knows, it might go upwards



posted on Sep, 9 2018 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: Hellmutt
Any chance Florence will hit Florence in South Carolina?


Don't know if that was suppose to be funny or not, but I thought so. LOL !

Shouldn't laugh because I was born in Florence and have a lot of family down there. But, they have been through these storms many times, so I'm not to worried.




posted on Sep, 9 2018 @ 03:39 PM
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Latest update......





posted on Sep, 9 2018 @ 03:43 PM
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As long as folks take some basic precautions and don't live in a flood prone area or on the beach there is very little to fear from a hurricane.
As you have time to monitor it and prepare versus several other natural disasters, course if you live in a flood prone area or on the beach I can understand fearing them.



posted on Sep, 9 2018 @ 04:08 PM
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a reply to: Groot

Yes, but also to point out that it might be a bad idea to give a hurricane the name of a place that might be located in its path. I'm not superstitious (well, maybe just a little), but could a hurricane possibly be attracted to a place bearing its name? Maybe not, but I bet there will never be a hurricane named Miami, or hurricane Momma (mother of all hurricanes). Kidding aside, best of luck to you all! It's not the first hurricane and it won't be the last.



posted on Sep, 9 2018 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: Hellmutt
a reply to: Groot

Yes, but also to point out that it might be a bad idea to give a hurricane the name of a place that might be located in its path. I'm not superstitious (well, maybe just a little), but could a hurricane possibly be attracted to a place bearing its name? Maybe not, but I bet there will never be a hurricane named Miami, or hurricane Momma (mother of all hurricanes). Kidding aside, best of luck to you all! It's not the first hurricane and it won't be the last.


Hurricane ain't getting me, I have lived in Kentucky for 18 years. Got tired of all the stress of living in a hurricane prone area. As for my family, they have been living there for generations, so not to worried about them.
Thank you, though !






posted on Sep, 9 2018 @ 11:01 PM
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Hmmm, check out this video update.....






posted on Sep, 10 2018 @ 12:55 AM
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This is not looking good for North Carolina. We can expect extensive damage and flooding with possible catostrophic effects in some areas. Even the Chesapake will likely see storm surge flooding.

The latest satellite images show an intensifying hurricane. The computer models are showing a category 4 at landfall and then it stalling which will cause extremely dangerous flooding.

I expect the National Hurricane Center to issue hurricane watches later today(Monday) which will prompt mandatory evacuations for the watch areas.

This is playing out to be an extremely dangerous storm....not hype!



posted on Sep, 10 2018 @ 11:30 AM
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It looks like the models have shifted a little south, so South Carolina is now in the crosshairs also.

I expect hurricane watches to be issued later today. The Outer Banks, NC has issued a mandatory evacuation today for all non residents and will have a mandatory evacuation for everyone tomorrow.

*this thread about Florence was the first and the posts on the 1st page are taking the threat seriously



posted on Sep, 10 2018 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: jrod

Yeah this could be like Fran and Floyd combined. This could be a history maker and be one of if not the worst natural disaster to happen in NC in recent history.
edit on 10-9-2018 by ker2010 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2018 @ 04:36 PM
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Just got of the phone with my daughter, who lives on Folly Beach, SC that she has a plan and evacuating tonight.

Mandatory evacuations for all coastal counties of South Carolina starting tomorrow at noon. All lanes heading towards the coast to be reversed tomorrow also.

Stay safe out there !



Impacts all of SC’s 187-mile coastline starting at noon Tuesday Eastbound lanes of I-26 heading into Charleston and U.S. 501 into Myrtle Beach will be reversed Schools will be closed as far inland as Lexington County


www.postandcourier.com...





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