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Stuffed grape leaves

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posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 11:17 PM
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Alright I'm going to throw my cultural appropriation out there--I mean culinary! Culinary appropriation.

Grape leaves, what are they good for? Not much.

But you can stuff them and they are quite nice.

After you remove the leaves from the jar with some channel grips, give them a good rinse as they are packed in brine.



I was a bit drunk and accidentally deleted the pic with ingredients laid out


So just imagine a couple serving bowls with about:

3/4 cup finely chopped parsley

3/4 cup chopped mint

1 medium onion diced or chopped

and however much garlic you think you can handle

also 1 cup uncooked rice

You can also go a little more exotic and add something like dried raisins or perhaps pistachio or pine nuts

Combine all ingredients with about 1.5-2 lbs. ground whatever you want. I've prepared this with lamb or bison. I'm sure beef works well too.

Give a good blast of salt and pepper, and a squeeze or two of fresh lemon juice.

You want to use your hands to squish it up good and pinch out a few doses to fit the leaves for rolling. My jars usually come with both large and smaller sized leaves.

You may have to cut some of the especially large leaves in half. I had a lot of small leaves in this batch so ended up having to double up for rolling. Roll out a little log of your mixture and roll it up nice and good.



Pack em in a big soup pot trying to fill that space up. You want them nice and snug so they don't move around or open up while cooking.



Add with only enough water to cover the rolls for even cooking. Add whatever spices you like. I keep it simple with some turmeric, cumin, and coriander. I also add a few splashes of tomato sauce. To further help keep them still I also place a smaller pot lid on top and weigh it down.



Boil it down until the pot loses all its water (takes about an hour or more, so have patience.) Once it loses the water just keep it on low with a proper lid to allow the leaves to crisp up and dry out a bit. You can also place them in a hot oven for a few minutes to achieve the same effect (which I prefer as it reduces the chance of burning it on the bottom of the pot!)

Don't forget to serve with some fresh lemon juice. Mmmmmm whammy wozzle!





edit on 5-9-2018 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 11:24 PM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

This is one of my all time favorites, up there with a lot of Mediterranean/Middle Eastern/Ottoman cuisine.

Quality olive oil is a must.

I'm privy to lamb in the rice mixture though, omit for vegetarians. Tzatziki sauce is very good, omit if vegan.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 11:26 PM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

This stuff is the bomb. In the Mediterranean, where I come from originally, we call these Japrak or Yaprak. Or Dolma Japrak.

So good.


Next time try the same thing but wrapped in cabbage leaves and you have Sarma.

Mmmhmmmm!



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 11:26 PM
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Would add just a pinch of fresh ground nutmeg to the mix.

Serve with a nice glass of well-chilled retsina (the only way to drink retsina!).

OPA!



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 11:31 PM
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Ohh hooo

Pics.

Nais.

SF.



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 12:00 AM
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I like cabbage rolls but I do not think I would like grape leaves. I also dislike sushi.
edit on 5-9-2018 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 12:05 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

They have a nice tartness to them.



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 12:12 AM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

I just ate a grape leaf roll with my Greek salad. Nice to know how to make them.

I really like the Turkish version w Pine nuts and raisins.



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 02:42 AM
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originally posted by: NarcolepticBuddha
Alright I'm going to throw my cultural appropriation out there--I mean culinary! Culinary appropriation.

Grape leaves, what are they good for? Not much.

But you can stuff them and they are quite nice.

...

I was a bit drunk...



You're eating grape leaves, of course you are drunk


And you're supposed to eat the grapes, not the leaves, and dude you gotta wait a while, to let them ferment!!!!

Hehe..

Seriously though, sound like my kind of snack! I'll even eat weeds. Most are edible and can be made rather tastey.




posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 02:50 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
I like cabbage rolls but I do not think I would like grape leaves. I also dislike sushi.


Don't like sushi?

I knew there must have been something fundamentally wrong with you!!




posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 04:14 AM
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a reply to: Kharron

yaprak dolmasi. there are two ways you can do it, with olive oil not including any meat then it is called olive oiled (zeytinyagli) yaprak dolmasi or with meat then it is called Meaty (etli) Yaprak dolmasi.

sometimes they call the olive oilded (zeytin yagli) Yaprak Dolmasi, as Sarma.



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 07:45 AM
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Wow, that looks really, really, good!!

Nice pictures too (ahem)! Well done.

S&F for you!



ETA - Love me some Greek food!
edit on 9/5/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

Dolmathes

We grew up on these. Lemon juice!!!! and if you like topped with mayo.

you need to get rid of some of the starch of the rice beforehand.


If you get the chance source the grapevine leaves yourself - the best!



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 08:15 AM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

PS'

While you're into stuffing try these - gemista




posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

Source the grape leaves myself huh?

Can you use fresh? Do you have to treat them anyway? Do you have to use a certain kind?

(both my neighbor and my mom have grapes!)

Thanks OP. I may have to try this!

@ RM, yeah, I can't stand sushi either!



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 08:38 AM
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a reply to: SummerRain




I'll even eat weeds


My wife loves weeds

www.youtube.com...






posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 08:40 AM
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a reply to: chiefsmom

prepping leaves


Either soak in very hot water for 15 minutes to soften the leaves or blanch grape leaves in a brine until they are soft (the time will depend on the leaves – fresh ones will only take a minute). Bring water to and boil. Add grape leave, approximately 12 leave at a time



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: chiefsmom

I just remembered this - seeing as you have an abundance of leaves - save some for off season




Place the bundles of blanched grape leaves in freezer bags or containers and freeze. Label each bag or container with the contents, the date frozen, and the date to use by. They will keep well in the freezer for six months.



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 09:09 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight


Awesome! Thank you for the info!



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 09:11 PM
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originally posted by: chiefsmom
[/post]

Source the grape leaves myself huh?

Can you use fresh? Do you have to treat them anyway?

Do you have to use a certain kind?

(both my neighbor and my mom have grapes!)

Thanks OP. I may have to try this!

- just blanch before hand, or steam , or microwave
for a min. or two in a bowl of water.
There are basically two kinds of grape-leaves:
-thin 'wild' grapes > USE

- thick (as concord-grape)> DON'T use !
Concord leaves have a 'flannel' fuzzy side



-
edit on 5/9/18 by ToneDeaf because: (no reason given)



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