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‘White People Food’ Is Creating An Unattainable Picture Of Health

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posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 01:28 PM
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If somebody wants real
African food, try this restaurant in Disney's Animal Kingdom Lodge. I've eaten there and the cuisine is fabulous. disneyworld.disney.go.com...




posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 01:37 PM
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I think the only white people food I can think of is crackers...


I think we can call food whatever we want to call it, but if I was to suggest that watermelon or fried chicken was black food I would be an instant racist to many. I don't think healthy food has color and if ethnic groups tend to eat food that is bad for you then so be it, they can even have it as their own.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: lakenheath24
Id rather die early. What a boring life for anyone that adheres to that godawful crap.a reply to: amazing



LOL

Hold up you guys I only said "Less" Red meat and pork and alcohol.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 01:55 PM
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Whew. Thems fightin words in some parts. Lol

a reply to: amazing



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 01:56 PM
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I am not sure if we should laugh or cry about this.

The problem is in a nut shell, is that no one takes health seriously. Not everyone will eat the same thing, we all have different tastes, and tend to eat different things, however, there are ways to improve our diet without going to that extreme.

Take the person in the article, she eats unhealthy, that is her choice. Maybe if she did not consume all of the sugary drinks, and perhaps, cut back on all of the fast food, and started to do something novel, like cook at home, her life and health would be a bit different.

There has been a shift, in the way we eat, where more and more it is the get it now food, and less and less of the food that takes a bit to cook and make.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 03:14 PM
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a reply to: dug88

It's obvious isn't it?

Only us white folks would be so nutty as to take all those foods from their native cultures and create some kind of mutt/Frankenfood with it and then tell everyone else it's good!

The nerve of us!



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

The problem is that HuffPo can publish this kind of crap, they are widely read.

This is the kind of thing we talk about when we talk about fake news -- stories that exist for the purpose of creating problems that maybe aren't actually problems.

I'll grant you it's not the only thing, but if one black lady thinks that Panera is creating oppressive white person food and that prevents her from eating healthy, why on earth does the HuffPo decide it's news?!



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko
You are on the 7th page of posts in response to their article.

I hate feeding the beast, and I know that I am just as guilty as the next person. I tell myself that someone has to drop an ounce of sanity into the madness, but now I am, beginning to believe that somethings are better left to die on the vine.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 03:38 PM
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If people would moderate their portions while making certain to actually get off their butts to exercise on a regular basis you can eat soul food and still be fairly healthy.

Its the large portions coupled with zero exercise that destroy peoples health.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 04:02 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: StallionDuck
I think most of this stuff is actually Cajun.


Which owes it's heritage to the influence of blacks from the Carib and Africa.


Should brush up on your history. I know my heritage and ^^^^^ isn't correct at all.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 04:06 PM
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originally posted by: scojak
a reply to: StallionDuck

Collard greens, fried chicken and Kool-Aid.

As a white male, I feel pretty racist saying that, but a black woman said basically the same thing and it wasn't racist, so I'm good, right?


I don't know why... My family eats the same often. It was a common meal in my house. It's not a "black" thing. It never was.

All 3 of those are considered cheap food so pretty much anyone who wasn't middle class or better ate those things and quite a few others. I guess rich people didn't eat rice and beans and greens and other vegetation. *shrugs* Dunno.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 04:12 PM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

I get it, but at the same time, we live in a world where people who are in charge of what our kids learn publish scholarly articles and hold seminars on how to deconstruct white oppressive constructs in teaching mathematics.

Seriously, simply teaching that 2+2=4 is white oppressive, and the reason that conclusion is arrived at it because there aren't enough minorities in mathematics (well, Asians don't count ... there aren't enough of the *right* kinds of minorities in mathematics).

When that kind of thought permeates what constitutes modern academia, then it trickles out into everything else --- including the young idiot who decided this piece constituted news at HuffPo.

The end result is that if something is wrong, it's likely because something in your life is white oppressive (unless you're white that is).



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 04:18 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

I get it, but at the same time, we live in a world where people who are in charge of what our kids learn publish scholarly articles and hold seminars on how to deconstruct white oppressive constructs in teaching mathematics.

Seriously, simply teaching that 2+2=4 is white oppressive, and the reason that conclusion is arrived at it because there aren't enough minorities in mathematics (well, Asians don't count ... there aren't enough of the *right* kinds of minorities in mathematics).

When that kind of thought permeates what constitutes modern academia, then it trickles out into everything else --- including the young idiot who decided this piece constituted news at HuffPo.

The end result is that if something is wrong, it's likely because something in your life is white oppressive (unless you're white that is).


The idiot at HuffPo takes this one woman's perceptions and turns it into this;



There's a perception in the black community that eating healthy means eating like white people, but it doesn't have to be that way.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Do you really believe that?

If you do then I guess the BS actually works. That is why they do it.
edit on 4-9-2018 by NightSkyeB4Dawn because: Posted "so". Meant "do".



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus




The French influence came when the Acadians moved down to Louisiana, the Carib/African/Spanish influence was already there. Acadian ingredients from Canada did not exist in Louisiana, hell even the name 'Acadian' became bastardized into 'Cajun'.


That is incorrect...
Remember... France owned Louisiana before all of that.

Canada was not a country at that time. There was no "canada". Just as well, my culture/heritage comes from Nova Scotia which was not considered a part of "canada's" main land at that time.

Since you're pretty damned ignorant of my culture, I'll give you a pure factual link that will help with your Cajun education.

Even though black culture (southern) and Cajuns have similarities and have influenced each other 'lightly', we are not the same and Creole does NOT equal Cajun and visa versa.

Gumbo may have originated from an African word but it was describing a French fish stew called bouillabaisse. Okra isn't used in Cajun culture to thicken Gumbo. It's used just as chicken and sausage, shrimp and crab as an optional ingredient. Roux is used to thicken a Gumbo. Roux is French.

The "holy trinity" of Cajun food is considered bell peppers, onion and celery which is our seasoning. We also use Parsley, bay leaves, and scallions as well as garlic and cayenne pepper.

Everything Cajun



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: StallionDuck
Should brush up on your history. I know my heritage and ^^^^^ isn't correct at all.


If you say so...


If the nuns brought with them the rudiments of French cuisine, blacks can be credited with using what little was available locally to devise something edible. By 1744 the Compagnie des Indes had imported some two thousand slaves from the west coast of Africa and the West Indies. The 1724 Code Noir , French regulations for treatment of blacks, made Louisiana a pleasanter place for them to live than Britishruled areas. Also, the French were lax in enforcing regulations against miscegenation.

Black cooks had a sophisticated tradition of preparing food. Their African ancestors had traded with Arabs since the eighth century and had left a legacy of various cultivated Middle Eastern vegetables. By the sixteenth century West African farmers were growing corn, peanuts, yams, eggplant, garlic, and onions, which they had assimilated into their native diet of kidney beans, varieties of rice, green leafy vegetables, and okra. Foods were prepared by long, slow cooking and were served with delicate sauces.

It is thought that okra, called kingombo , was brought to the New World by slaves. The popular mainstay among Catholic families of Louisiana, gumbo z’herbes , is taken from a similar African dish made of various greens and herbs. An old saying states that a new friend will be made for each different green used in the soup. During the months when okra was in season, it was the key ingredient for thickening gumbo, replacing the Indian filé powder used the rest of the year. Read me


Maybe ask whoever taught you history to pick up a book or two.






edit on 4-9-2018 by AugustusMasonicus because: Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: StallionDuck

You even read your own source? It says the same thing I just told you. Acadians = Cajuns. Therefore no Acadians/Cajuns, no Cajun Cuisine. The blacks were there before the Cajuns and influenced the cooking.

When you're done re-reading your own link you can read the one I gave you which deals with cooking.





edit on 4-9-2018 by AugustusMasonicus because: Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 05:08 PM
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"White people food," just like "white people everything else," is a fantasy cooked up by corporations and advertisers to sell an image to people. Trendy foods. Fashion. What kind of car to buy. What kind of life to try to aspire to -- Mom and Dad in a suburban house with two kids. These days, white people are being very heavily sold on the image of Old Mom and Old Dad dressed in white linen and bicycling on the beach. Why? Because somebody wants the old white peoples' investment and health insurance money.

Truth is, there is no diet that will help anyone live significantly longer than average. Some diets will make you less healthy, particularly if you have a predisposition for bad health. But past a certain age, we all start to decay and die no matter what we do, because if we didn't we'd be hogging all the resources for the younger generations -- the ones who have more immunity to newer viral mutations. We're programmed to die.

And knowing this, all of us in countries where food and fresh water is plentiful can make a choice. Live large and die young. Or live like a monk, complete with holier-than-thou attitude, and die slightly older (maybe).

Race is an outmoded concept. But economics and demographics are the real deal.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 05:11 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: StallionDuck

You even read your own source? It says the same thing I just told you. Acadians = Cajuns. Therefore no Acadians/Cajuns, no Cajun Cuisine. The blacks were there before the Cajuns and influenced the cooking.

When you're done re-reading your own link you can read the one I gave you which deals with cooking.



Again.. You're insinuating too much and that the food culture is more in one place than the other. Just because other cultures used the same ingredients doesn't mean they are the originators of that food. Remember... Cajun may have come from Acadian which is correct but Acadian also came from France long before that, among other cultures/races (whatever) and had mixed with Natives when we reached the swamps. Most of the dark skin you see in the Cajun people are not only French but Native as well.

A majority of our traditions and foods were taken down with us. Not all ingredients were oblivious to what is now Canada.

Blacks didn't influence the cooking. They didn't bring seeds with them from Africa. Remember, they were working for the man back then... then French and Spanish man. When they mixed, they became known as Creole. Blacks didn't originate in the caribbean. The Taíno were the natives. Blacks were slaves there, just as were criminals of many races.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 05:22 PM
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originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn
a reply to: ketsuko

Do you really believe that?

If you do then I guess the BS actually works. That is why they do it.


I don't have to believe it. I see the scholarly articles they are publishing, and the woman who thinks that about math? Yeah, she was instrumental in helping develop the new common core math where the kids have to write the steps and if they do that, they can get the wrong answer and still get some points because process is the most important part.

But if your kid simply writes 2+2=4? He or she gets *no* credit even though they have they the right answer.

The message is that process is more important than the answer.

Would you drive across a bridge or want to live in a building designed by someone who believed math ought to be that way? ie - more subjective than objective? But in the minds of people who think like this, the objective approach is wrong because it's always been that way and in their minds white folks made it that way so it's wrong.

I don't have to believe it, but that doesn't mean that it's not embedded at the major universities and being taught to young people who aren't carrying it out into the world like this HuffPo writer did.



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