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The Great Global Warming Swindle Documentary

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posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 09:17 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Greven


It's rather disingenuous to highlight water vapor and downplay CO2 emissions.

Not really. Water vapor is far more abundant, and has spectral absorption magnitudes greater than carbon dioxide.

And, unless the faces in that video are made of carbon dioxide or water vapor, it's not even showing them... it's showing infrared radiation... aka heat... and you call me disingenuous?


What is the ratio of carbon to hydrogen in gasoline, do you suppose?

Well, for starters, gasoline is not a specific hydrocarbon. It is a mixture of hydrocarbons, roughly from hexane to dodecane, with a few aromatics mixed in... it is refined by boiling point, not by molecular weight. But since gasoline is measured in octane rating, one can infer the same amount of octane and adjust by the rating. Hexane is C8H18.


You can infer the emissions from that.

Not really that exactly. There's the issue of combustion efficiency, oxygen supply, etc. Inferences are not exactly exact science.

TheRedneck

Yet, you can see clouds coming from exhaust pipes, where you cannot see such with the naked eye. It's an odd criticism that, simply because it's shown via FLIR, it isn't... real I guess?

I'm fairly sure that the tank will be empty at some point of continual use.

Whether gasoline is burned or escapes into the atmosphere, it will combine with oxygen. C8H18 would mean close to an even split of water vapor and carbon oxides, with water vapor taking a slight lead.
edit on 21Tue, 04 Sep 2018 21:21:21 -0500America/ChicagovAmerica/Chicago9 by Greven because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 09:19 PM
link   
a reply to: Groot

Yeah. Time is a problem. When climates change fast it's a real problem.

Thing is, the causes of other warming trends are being studied as well as can be and their causes are becoming better understood. The "little ice age" for example. Turns out that it affected pretty much only the northern hemisphere and seems that it was caused by high volcanic activity. The chart you posted shows that.

Thing is, those things that caused those other trends don't seem to be happening now. What seems to be happening that we are burning a hell of a lot of fossil fuels and dumping a hell of a lot of CO2 into the atmosphere. That causes increased radiative forcing, that's the opposite of what volcanoes do. Maybe we can hope for some massive volcanic activity.

And there are the internal processes (El Nino, La Nino, etc.). But they're just redistribution of heat between the atmosphere and the oceans. They show as spikes in the trend. The warming trend. They spike up, then down. But the up spike is higher than the previous one and the down spike is not as low.
edit on 9/4/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 09:23 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Groot

Yeah. Time is a problem. When climates change fast it's a real problem.

Thing is, the causes of other warming trends are being studied as well as can be and their causes are becoming better understood. The "little ice age" for example. Turns out that it affected pretty much only the northern hemisphere and seems that it was caused by high volcanic activity. The chart you posted shows that.

Thing is, those things that caused those other trends don't seem to be happening now. What seems to be happening that we are burning a hell of a lot of fossil fuels and dumping a hell of a lot of CO2 into the atmosphere. That causes increased radiative forcing, that's the opposite of what volcanoes do.

Maybe we can hope for some massive volcanic activity.


Seems alot of volcanic activity going on now. I would much rather have global warming then global cooling.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 09:27 PM
link   
a reply to: Groot




Seems alot of volcanic activity going on now.


Maybe. Hard to get good enough data to determine changes over the past 100 years or so but recently, not so much:

I've been working on updating the chart but the website is broken at the moment.



But it's the explosive stuff that's the important stuff. Throws sulfates up into the stratosphere. Things like the Kilauea eruption don't really do that.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 09:32 PM
link   

originally posted by: Groot
a reply to: Phage

The real problem is time. Earth is a big girl and goes through cycles. Humans are mere fleas compared to the sun and everything else. You can't compare a few hundred years vs thousands of years. It's like comparing what my 8 year old grand daughter has done vs me , a 54 year old old fart.







Until late 2006, global temperatures were more than a degree Fahrenheit warmer when compared to the 20th Century average. From August of 2007 through February of 2008, the Earth's mean temperature dropped to near the 20th Century average of 57 degrees. Since that time, land and ocean readings have rebounded to the highest levels in recorded history in 2016 with a temperature of 58.69 degrees Fahrenheit. For 2017, the global temperature was 58.51 degrees Fahrenheit. We, Climatologist Cliff Harris and Meteorologist Randy Mann, believe in rather frequent climate changes in our global weather patterns. Geologic evidence shows our climate has been changing over millions of years. The warming and cooling of global temperatures are likely the result of long-term climatic cycles, solar activity, sea-surface temperature patterns and more. However, Mankind's activities of the burning of fossil fuels, massive deforestations, the replacing of grassy surfaces with asphalt and concrete, the "Urban Heat Island Effect" are likely creating more harmful pollution. Yes, we believe we should be "going green" whenever and wherever possible. Our planet seems to be in a cycle of constant change. According to an article by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on Climate.gov in August, 2014, our planet likely experienced its hottest weather millions of years ago. One period, which was probably the warmest, was during the Neoproterozic around 600 to 800 million years ago. Approximately 56 million years ago, our planet was in the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum as global mean temperatures were estimated as high as 73 degrees Fahrenheit, over 15 degrees above current levels. Ocean sediments and fossils indicate that massive amounts of carbon dioxide were released into the atmosphere. By contrast, evidence shows there have been at least five major ice ages on Planet Earth. One of the most well-documented and largest, occurred from 850 to 630 million years ago, is called the Cryogenian period. Glacial ice sheets likely reached all the way the equator producing a "Snowball Earth." Scientists believe that this massive ice age ended due to increased underground volcanic activity and, perhaps, a much warmer solar cycle. One reason scientists believe that the Earth's temperature reached a record level in 2016 was the very strong El Nino in the waters of the south-central Pacific Ocean that formed in 2015. El Nino is the abnormal warming of ocean waters that often leads warmer air temperatures and less snowfall during the winter seasons. In 2007-08, a moderately strong La Nina, the cooler than normal sea-surface temperature event, combined with extremely low solar activity (storms on the sun), resulted in a period of global cooling and record snowfalls across many parts of the northern U.S., Europe, Asia and the Former Soviet Union. The same type of situation, perhaps more severe, could occur again in the early 2020s, especially if we see a strong La Nina combined with very low solar activity.


www.longrangeweather.com...

Hmm... this was the original posted on Wikipedia in 2009:


edit on 21Tue, 04 Sep 2018 21:33:17 -0500America/ChicagovAmerica/Chicago9 by Greven because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 09:47 PM
link   
a reply to: Greven

97 out of a hundred CO2 molecules agree, they are not manmade.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 09:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Groot




Seems alot of volcanic activity going on now.


Maybe. Hard to get good enough data to determine changes over the past 100 years or so but recently, not so much:

I've been working on updating the chart but the website is broken at the moment.



But it's the explosive stuff that's the important stuff. Throws sulfates up into the stratosphere. Things like the Kilauea eruption don't really do that.


Yes, indeed, the really big poof machines are what really matters. If Yellowstone , or any other blows, break out you winter coats.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 09:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: Greven

originally posted by: Groot
a reply to: Phage

The real problem is time. Earth is a big girl and goes through cycles. Humans are mere fleas compared to the sun and everything else. You can't compare a few hundred years vs thousands of years. It's like comparing what my 8 year old grand daughter has done vs me , a 54 year old old fart.







Until late 2006, global temperatures were more than a degree Fahrenheit warmer when compared to the 20th Century average. From August of 2007 through February of 2008, the Earth's mean temperature dropped to near the 20th Century average of 57 degrees. Since that time, land and ocean readings have rebounded to the highest levels in recorded history in 2016 with a temperature of 58.69 degrees Fahrenheit. For 2017, the global temperature was 58.51 degrees Fahrenheit. We, Climatologist Cliff Harris and Meteorologist Randy Mann, believe in rather frequent climate changes in our global weather patterns. Geologic evidence shows our climate has been changing over millions of years. The warming and cooling of global temperatures are likely the result of long-term climatic cycles, solar activity, sea-surface temperature patterns and more. However, Mankind's activities of the burning of fossil fuels, massive deforestations, the replacing of grassy surfaces with asphalt and concrete, the "Urban Heat Island Effect" are likely creating more harmful pollution. Yes, we believe we should be "going green" whenever and wherever possible. Our planet seems to be in a cycle of constant change. According to an article by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on Climate.gov in August, 2014, our planet likely experienced its hottest weather millions of years ago. One period, which was probably the warmest, was during the Neoproterozic around 600 to 800 million years ago. Approximately 56 million years ago, our planet was in the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum as global mean temperatures were estimated as high as 73 degrees Fahrenheit, over 15 degrees above current levels. Ocean sediments and fossils indicate that massive amounts of carbon dioxide were released into the atmosphere. By contrast, evidence shows there have been at least five major ice ages on Planet Earth. One of the most well-documented and largest, occurred from 850 to 630 million years ago, is called the Cryogenian period. Glacial ice sheets likely reached all the way the equator producing a "Snowball Earth." Scientists believe that this massive ice age ended due to increased underground volcanic activity and, perhaps, a much warmer solar cycle. One reason scientists believe that the Earth's temperature reached a record level in 2016 was the very strong El Nino in the waters of the south-central Pacific Ocean that formed in 2015. El Nino is the abnormal warming of ocean waters that often leads warmer air temperatures and less snowfall during the winter seasons. In 2007-08, a moderately strong La Nina, the cooler than normal sea-surface temperature event, combined with extremely low solar activity (storms on the sun), resulted in a period of global cooling and record snowfalls across many parts of the northern U.S., Europe, Asia and the Former Soviet Union. The same type of situation, perhaps more severe, could occur again in the early 2020s, especially if we see a strong La Nina combined with very low solar activity.


www.longrangeweather.com...

Hmm... this was the original posted on Wikipedia in 2009:



Really? Tell me please how it's different and please tell me why you trust wikipedia.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 09:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: RumpleStiltskin
a reply to: Greven

97 out of a hundred CO2 molecules agree, they are not manmade.


Given that CO2 was 280ppm in 1780 and today it is over 400ppm, I'm gonna have to disagree.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 09:57 PM
link   

originally posted by: Groot

originally posted by: Greven

originally posted by: Groot
a reply to: Phage

The real problem is time. Earth is a big girl and goes through cycles. Humans are mere fleas compared to the sun and everything else. You can't compare a few hundred years vs thousands of years. It's like comparing what my 8 year old grand daughter has done vs me , a 54 year old old fart.







Until late 2006, global temperatures were more than a degree Fahrenheit warmer when compared to the 20th Century average. From August of 2007 through February of 2008, the Earth's mean temperature dropped to near the 20th Century average of 57 degrees. Since that time, land and ocean readings have rebounded to the highest levels in recorded history in 2016 with a temperature of 58.69 degrees Fahrenheit. For 2017, the global temperature was 58.51 degrees Fahrenheit. We, Climatologist Cliff Harris and Meteorologist Randy Mann, believe in rather frequent climate changes in our global weather patterns. Geologic evidence shows our climate has been changing over millions of years. The warming and cooling of global temperatures are likely the result of long-term climatic cycles, solar activity, sea-surface temperature patterns and more. However, Mankind's activities of the burning of fossil fuels, massive deforestations, the replacing of grassy surfaces with asphalt and concrete, the "Urban Heat Island Effect" are likely creating more harmful pollution. Yes, we believe we should be "going green" whenever and wherever possible. Our planet seems to be in a cycle of constant change. According to an article by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on Climate.gov in August, 2014, our planet likely experienced its hottest weather millions of years ago. One period, which was probably the warmest, was during the Neoproterozic around 600 to 800 million years ago. Approximately 56 million years ago, our planet was in the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum as global mean temperatures were estimated as high as 73 degrees Fahrenheit, over 15 degrees above current levels. Ocean sediments and fossils indicate that massive amounts of carbon dioxide were released into the atmosphere. By contrast, evidence shows there have been at least five major ice ages on Planet Earth. One of the most well-documented and largest, occurred from 850 to 630 million years ago, is called the Cryogenian period. Glacial ice sheets likely reached all the way the equator producing a "Snowball Earth." Scientists believe that this massive ice age ended due to increased underground volcanic activity and, perhaps, a much warmer solar cycle. One reason scientists believe that the Earth's temperature reached a record level in 2016 was the very strong El Nino in the waters of the south-central Pacific Ocean that formed in 2015. El Nino is the abnormal warming of ocean waters that often leads warmer air temperatures and less snowfall during the winter seasons. In 2007-08, a moderately strong La Nina, the cooler than normal sea-surface temperature event, combined with extremely low solar activity (storms on the sun), resulted in a period of global cooling and record snowfalls across many parts of the northern U.S., Europe, Asia and the Former Soviet Union. The same type of situation, perhaps more severe, could occur again in the early 2020s, especially if we see a strong La Nina combined with very low solar activity.


www.longrangeweather.com...

Hmm... this was the original posted on Wikipedia in 2009:



Really? Tell me please how it's different and please tell me why you trust wikipedia.

It's a little different, though the original is recorded as having been published in 2009. Yours seems to be a continuation of a flaw from quite awhile ago.

For starters, the "Little Ice Age" is not a smooth curve as depicted there, something we know well from various records.

Speaking of 2009, though, here's a fun projection by Dr. Don J. Easterbrook that obviously wasn't borne out by reality. However, it does show some of the oscillations during the "Little Ice Age" pretty well in figure 2.



posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 10:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: Greven

originally posted by: Groot

originally posted by: Greven

originally posted by: Groot
a reply to: Phage

The real problem is time. Earth is a big girl and goes through cycles. Humans are mere fleas compared to the sun and everything else. You can't compare a few hundred years vs thousands of years. It's like comparing what my 8 year old grand daughter has done vs me , a 54 year old old fart.







Until late 2006, global temperatures were more than a degree Fahrenheit warmer when compared to the 20th Century average. From August of 2007 through February of 2008, the Earth's mean temperature dropped to near the 20th Century average of 57 degrees. Since that time, land and ocean readings have rebounded to the highest levels in recorded history in 2016 with a temperature of 58.69 degrees Fahrenheit. For 2017, the global temperature was 58.51 degrees Fahrenheit. We, Climatologist Cliff Harris and Meteorologist Randy Mann, believe in rather frequent climate changes in our global weather patterns. Geologic evidence shows our climate has been changing over millions of years. The warming and cooling of global temperatures are likely the result of long-term climatic cycles, solar activity, sea-surface temperature patterns and more. However, Mankind's activities of the burning of fossil fuels, massive deforestations, the replacing of grassy surfaces with asphalt and concrete, the "Urban Heat Island Effect" are likely creating more harmful pollution. Yes, we believe we should be "going green" whenever and wherever possible. Our planet seems to be in a cycle of constant change. According to an article by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on Climate.gov in August, 2014, our planet likely experienced its hottest weather millions of years ago. One period, which was probably the warmest, was during the Neoproterozic around 600 to 800 million years ago. Approximately 56 million years ago, our planet was in the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum as global mean temperatures were estimated as high as 73 degrees Fahrenheit, over 15 degrees above current levels. Ocean sediments and fossils indicate that massive amounts of carbon dioxide were released into the atmosphere. By contrast, evidence shows there have been at least five major ice ages on Planet Earth. One of the most well-documented and largest, occurred from 850 to 630 million years ago, is called the Cryogenian period. Glacial ice sheets likely reached all the way the equator producing a "Snowball Earth." Scientists believe that this massive ice age ended due to increased underground volcanic activity and, perhaps, a much warmer solar cycle. One reason scientists believe that the Earth's temperature reached a record level in 2016 was the very strong El Nino in the waters of the south-central Pacific Ocean that formed in 2015. El Nino is the abnormal warming of ocean waters that often leads warmer air temperatures and less snowfall during the winter seasons. In 2007-08, a moderately strong La Nina, the cooler than normal sea-surface temperature event, combined with extremely low solar activity (storms on the sun), resulted in a period of global cooling and record snowfalls across many parts of the northern U.S., Europe, Asia and the Former Soviet Union. The same type of situation, perhaps more severe, could occur again in the early 2020s, especially if we see a strong La Nina combined with very low solar activity.


www.longrangeweather.com...

Hmm... this was the original posted on Wikipedia in 2009:



Really? Tell me please how it's different and please tell me why you trust wikipedia.

It's a little different, though the original is recorded as having been published in 2009. Yours seems to be a continuation of a flaw from quite awhile ago.

For starters, the "Little Ice Age" is not a smooth curve as depicted there, something we know well from various records.

Speaking of 2009, though, here's a fun projection by Dr. Don J. Easterbrook that obviously wasn't borne out by reality. However, it does show some of the oscillations during the "Little Ice Age" pretty well in figure 2.


Did you even read and understand the report? Did you even watch the documentary?

Yeah, I'm done with you.





posted on Sep, 4 2018 @ 10:42 PM
link   

originally posted by: Groot

originally posted by: Greven

originally posted by: Groot

originally posted by: Greven

originally posted by: Groot
a reply to: Phage

The real problem is time. Earth is a big girl and goes through cycles. Humans are mere fleas compared to the sun and everything else. You can't compare a few hundred years vs thousands of years. It's like comparing what my 8 year old grand daughter has done vs me , a 54 year old old fart.







Until late 2006, global temperatures were more than a degree Fahrenheit warmer when compared to the 20th Century average. From August of 2007 through February of 2008, the Earth's mean temperature dropped to near the 20th Century average of 57 degrees. Since that time, land and ocean readings have rebounded to the highest levels in recorded history in 2016 with a temperature of 58.69 degrees Fahrenheit. For 2017, the global temperature was 58.51 degrees Fahrenheit. We, Climatologist Cliff Harris and Meteorologist Randy Mann, believe in rather frequent climate changes in our global weather patterns. Geologic evidence shows our climate has been changing over millions of years. The warming and cooling of global temperatures are likely the result of long-term climatic cycles, solar activity, sea-surface temperature patterns and more. However, Mankind's activities of the burning of fossil fuels, massive deforestations, the replacing of grassy surfaces with asphalt and concrete, the "Urban Heat Island Effect" are likely creating more harmful pollution. Yes, we believe we should be "going green" whenever and wherever possible. Our planet seems to be in a cycle of constant change. According to an article by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on Climate.gov in August, 2014, our planet likely experienced its hottest weather millions of years ago. One period, which was probably the warmest, was during the Neoproterozic around 600 to 800 million years ago. Approximately 56 million years ago, our planet was in the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum as global mean temperatures were estimated as high as 73 degrees Fahrenheit, over 15 degrees above current levels. Ocean sediments and fossils indicate that massive amounts of carbon dioxide were released into the atmosphere. By contrast, evidence shows there have been at least five major ice ages on Planet Earth. One of the most well-documented and largest, occurred from 850 to 630 million years ago, is called the Cryogenian period. Glacial ice sheets likely reached all the way the equator producing a "Snowball Earth." Scientists believe that this massive ice age ended due to increased underground volcanic activity and, perhaps, a much warmer solar cycle. One reason scientists believe that the Earth's temperature reached a record level in 2016 was the very strong El Nino in the waters of the south-central Pacific Ocean that formed in 2015. El Nino is the abnormal warming of ocean waters that often leads warmer air temperatures and less snowfall during the winter seasons. In 2007-08, a moderately strong La Nina, the cooler than normal sea-surface temperature event, combined with extremely low solar activity (storms on the sun), resulted in a period of global cooling and record snowfalls across many parts of the northern U.S., Europe, Asia and the Former Soviet Union. The same type of situation, perhaps more severe, could occur again in the early 2020s, especially if we see a strong La Nina combined with very low solar activity.


www.longrangeweather.com...

Hmm... this was the original posted on Wikipedia in 2009:



Really? Tell me please how it's different and please tell me why you trust wikipedia.

It's a little different, though the original is recorded as having been published in 2009. Yours seems to be a continuation of a flaw from quite awhile ago.

For starters, the "Little Ice Age" is not a smooth curve as depicted there, something we know well from various records.

Speaking of 2009, though, here's a fun projection by Dr. Don J. Easterbrook that obviously wasn't borne out by reality. However, it does show some of the oscillations during the "Little Ice Age" pretty well in figure 2.


Did you even read and understand the report? Did you even watch the documentary?

Yeah, I'm done with you.



Did you watch the same documentary that I did - the one that said CO2 (along with water vapor) is a greenhouse gas and that the surface is warming? The one that said the Earth would be uninhabitable without the greenhouse effect? I mean, that's in the first 15 minutes...

We're emitting CO2, so we're essentially increasing the greenhouse effect. Ergo, we are warming the surface. It's the strawman argument that somehow science is wrong because some claim that they made up doesn't hold because it's warmer than expected at the surface which annoys me. I mean, that's like saying you didn't cut your thumb because in reality you cut off your thumb.

Whether you like it or don't, the fact of the matter is that the Little Ice Age isn't how it's depicted in that chart.
edit on 22Tue, 04 Sep 2018 22:48:51 -0500America/ChicagovAmerica/Chicago9 by Greven because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 12:49 AM
link   
a reply to: Greven


Yet, you can see clouds coming from exhaust pipes, where you cannot see such with the naked eye. It's an odd criticism that, simply because it's shown via FLIR, it isn't... real I guess?

The heat in the video is real enough, but it's not carbon dioxide. That's my complaint. There may be carbon dioxide in the exhaust gases (likely is), but that's not what you are seeing. Those 'clouds' are areas of hot gases, not areas of carbon dioxide.

I know better when I see a video like that, but most people don't... so most people will simply accept that there's a way for a camera to see carbon dioxide. I'll likely get a call from a couple people I know at some point in the future telling me about this new way they have to see carbon dioxide!

Again, look at the faces of people... they glow just like the 'clouds.' Are they made of carbon dioxide?

That video is the very definition of disingenuity. The author shouldn't be taken seriously on anything; if he gets something right, it's likely an accident.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 03:34 AM
link   
a reply to: Greven


The same 'scientific dictatorship' that brought you the internet, cell phones, etc?

The Scientific Dictatorship did not produce the internet or cell phones. I did not say science.............I said the scientific dictatorship.
Here:

Watch and find out what the 'scientific dictatorship' is.

edit on 5-9-2018 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 04:11 AM
link   
To deny the tangible evidence of the man made impact on this planet is foolish. But to submit to the lucrative business of climate change is equally foolish. I believe the truth lies somewhere in the middle.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with reducing and minimizing our carbon footprint. We need to stop depleting the underground aquifers. We need to stop the damaging effects of chemicals/pesticides being deposited into the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. We need to stop relying on fossil fuels and causing oil spills. Figure out how to manage the massive elephant in the room that is nuclear waste. And for Christ’s sake, stop f***ing littering! There is nothing wrong in cleaning up after ourselves and doing so in a timely manner.

There is a huge laundry list of things we need to improve and do better with as the current stewards of this planet because we aren’t doing a good job of it. But, at the same time, thousands of years ago, where I stand right now was covered in ice, 2 miles tall. That recession of those glaciers was not from us. They have been reversing for a long time. There is a thing called nature that is far more powerful than we truly know and we’re lucky she hasn’t freaked out on us.

In the meantime, let’s not piss her off anymore than we already have.



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 04:22 AM
link   
a reply to: Assassin82

Did you know that Henry Ford designed a car made of hemp that would run on hemp oil?
Imagine how the world would be if that had been allowed??
The car would also run on alcohol.
It was supposed to be for the farmers (Henry Ford came from a family of farmers) and the people...............hemp is easy to grow and alcohol is made of grain.

Someone invented a car that runs on water............and he is now dead!!




edit on 5-9-2018 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 04:54 AM
link   

originally posted by: Itisnowagain
a reply to: Assassin82

Did you know that Henry Ford designed a car made of hemp that would run on hemp oil?
Imagine how the world would be if that had been allowed??
The car would also run on alcohol.
It was supposed to be for the farmers (Henry Ford came from a family of farmers) and the people...............hemp is easy to grow and alcohol is made of grain.

Someone invented a car that runs on water............and he is now dead!!





The war on hemp is a sad tale in our history. So many great things it can do yet so many people object so fiercely to it. But I did not know either of those things you mentioned. I’ll look into it. Thanks for sharing.



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 05:16 AM
link   

originally posted by: Assassin82

originally posted by: Itisnowagain
a reply to: Assassin82

Did you know that Henry Ford designed a car made of hemp that would run on hemp oil?
Imagine how the world would be if that had been allowed??
The car would also run on alcohol.
It was supposed to be for the farmers (Henry Ford came from a family of farmers) and the people...............hemp is easy to grow and alcohol is made of grain.

Someone invented a car that runs on water............and he is now dead!!





The war on hemp is a sad tale in our history. So many great things it can do yet so many people object so fiercely to it. But I did not know either of those things you mentioned. I’ll look into it. Thanks for sharing.



Going back to 1619 America’s first marijuana law was enacted at Jamestown Colony, VA. All farmers were ordered to grow Indian hemp seed. Mandatory cultivation laws were enacted in MA in 1631, in CT in 1632, and in the Chesapeake colonies in the 1700’s.

Cannabis hemp was even used as legal tender in most of the Americas from 1631 until the early 1800’s. The reason for making it legal tender was to encourage farmers to grow more. You could then pay your taxes with cannabis hemp throughout America for over 200 years. If you did not grow hemp during periods of shortages, you could be jailed.
hubpages.com...

In 1619, King James the First decreed that every colonist in the New World was to grow 10 hemp plants for export to England. George Washington grew hemp at Mount Vernon. It was used for ship sails and paper, among other valuable commodities. It was considered to be a valuable cash crop.
naturalsociety.com...



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 09:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: Itisnowagain
a reply to: Assassin82

Someone invented a car that runs on water............and he is now dead!!

Source?



posted on Sep, 5 2018 @ 11:06 AM
link   
a reply to: Groot

Are you going to try tell me the plastic in the ocean must be from 'natural' causes because us humans are just fleas and could not possibly put so much plastic in the ocean?

That is basically your argument about CO2 in the atmosphere...a 40%+ rise in less than 200 years is not natural!



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