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Catholic Schools

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posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 02:15 PM
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Here's a few facts about Catholic Schools :




Catholic schools are parochial schools or education ministries of the Roman Catholic Church.As of 2011, the Church operates the world's largest non-governmental school system.[1] In 2016, the church supported 43,800 secondary schools, and95,200 primary schools.[2] Catholic schools participate in the evangelizing mission of the Church, integrating religious education as a core subject within their curriculum.


They also operate nurseries.




....The Relief Acts of 1782 and the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829 later increased the possibility to openly practice Catholicism in England and to create charitable institutions by the Church.[3] This led to the development of numerous native religious congregations which established schools, hospitals, orphanages, reformatories, and workhouses.[3] Traditionally, Catholic schools originated as single sex schools.





Like other Christian-affiliated institutions, Catholic schools are generally nondenominational,in that they accept anyone regardless of religion or denominational affiliation, race or ethnicity, or nationality, provided the admission or enrollment requirements and legal documents are submitted, and rules & regulations are obeyed for a fruitful school life. However, non-Catholics, whether Christian or not, may need to participate in or be exempted from required activities, particularly those of a religious nature. These are in keeping with the spirit of social inclusiveness.[5][6]


As long they're of school age , of course



Catholic schools in Ireland are state-aided, rather than state owned. Not all costs of operating, building and maintenance is provided by the central government.[clarification needed] Local communities raise funds, as well.[citation needed]Church groups in Ireland privately own most primary and secondary schools. Evidence indicates that approximately 60% of secondary schools pupils attend schoolsowned by religious congregations.[3]





The existence of Catholic schools in Canada can betraced to the year 1620, when the first school was founded by the Catholic Recollet Order in Quebec. Most schools in Canada were operated under the auspices of one Christian body or another until the 19th century.





Catholic schools are the largest non-public school system in the USA. In 2010, 2 million students attended 6,980 schools. 331 of these are private.[22] Catholicism of schools in the United States was first established during the 19th century with the arrival of English immigrants.Catholic schools in the USA are significant in that Catholicism is seen to have been critical in developing the American culture.


Needs Americans to explain that .



In Australia,Catholic schools have been operating for over 175 years.The arrival of the first European fleet brought the first Irish Catholics to Australia, predominantly by the transport of convicts. Catholics consisted one-tenth of the convicts settling in Australia, mostly Irish whilst the rest were English and Scottish. By 1803, 2,086 convicts of Irish descent and majority being Catholics had been transported to Botany Bay.[26]

Catholic schools are the largest group of non-government schools in Australia accounting for some 18% of institutions (1,705 of 9,529 as of 2009), compared to 11% for independent schools (1022).[27] Catholic schools are those run by the diocesan Catholic Department of Education; some independent schools are owned and run by Catholic religious orders. In addition, there is at least one school operating within the Society of St Pius X, Catholic traditionalists in irregular canonical status with Rome (Their current canonical status is being resolved in Rome presently): St Thomas Aquinas College in Tynong, Victoria.[citation needed]

As with other classes of non-government schools in Australia,Catholic schools receive funding from the Commonwealth Government. As this does not constitute the establishment of a church, nor the restriction of the free exercise of religion, nor does it create a religious test for public office, it is not considered to breach the separation of Church and State in Australia. This was the decision of the High Court in the Defence of Government Schools (DOGS) case of 1981,in which the judges selectively interpreted s.116 of the Australian Constitution, and is controversial.[28]





The vast majority of South Americans are Christians, mostly Roman Catholics. Over 80% in Hispanic countries and some 65%-70% in Brazil consider themselves Catholic.Catholic educational practices were brought to the indigenous population of the Inca by Spaniards, Portuguese and European cultures. Anticlericalism was established in the 19th century resulting to a temporary alienation between church and state.[citation needed]





State funding Main article:

In some countries,Catholic schools are funded by the state. These are institutions that requires assistance from the government. This is the same in public schools where government who mandate schools pay for the needs of schools whether in whole or in part, by taxes of the population. Australian catholic schools fall under this category, where the Australian government fund Catholic schools as well as state schools.[32]Non-independent catholic schools in Scotland is another example where the institutions arefully funded by the Scottish Government.





Voluntary aided schools are a kind of "maintained school", meaning that they receive the majority of their running costs from central government via the local authority, and do not charge fees to students. In contrast to other types of maintained school,only 90% of the capital costs of a voluntary aided school are met by government. The foundation contributes the rest of the capital costs, owns the school's land and buildings and appoints a majority of the school governors. The governing body runs the school, employs the staff and decides the school's admission arrangements, subject to rules imposed by central government. Pupils follow the National Curriculum, except that faith schools may teach Religious Education according to their own faith. Within the maintained sector in England, approximately 22% of primary schools and 17% of secondary schools are voluntary aided, including all of the Roman Catholic schools and the schools of non-Christian faiths.[citation needed]


All From current wiki

including:



Political context

There have been instances where some political ideologies that are engaged with secularism or countries that have high nationalism are suspicious of what Catholic schools are teaching. The moral and social teachings by Catholic schools may be seen as “continuation of Colonial cultural dominance of the society,” still being felt in Zambia, Malawi, and the colonies of Spain.[33]


This is a weak description of the 'poltical context' of catholic schooling , and the wiki page especially near the end will be /is one of those battleground areas . There is not a wiki page regarding the history of Catholic nursery schools , but there are list , some associated with the extra number of primary schools (age 5-11) . At 26 800 secondary (11-16) schools versus 95 200 primary




posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 02:39 PM
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a reply to: ZIPMATT
Regarding the English context, I should point out that the "Voluntary aided" system was originally designed to assist the Church of England school network.
In the nineteenth century, the bulk of the primary schools in the country, especially in the villages, were Church of England foundations. I went to one of them. My father was brought up as a Primitive Methodist; when he was going through teacher training, he was advised to get confirmed, because it would open up more jobs in the primary sector. (As a career move, this worked like a charm, which is why I grew up in a parish at the Anglo-Catholic end of the Church of England).
That is why the passing of the 1870 Education Act was bedevilled with religious controversies; it would be giving supplementary grants to schools including those giving Anglican teachings, and there was a three-way dispute between the C of E, the Nonconformists who wanted religious teaching to be restricted to general principles, and the secularists who wanted religious teaching to be banned altogether.

That's why it's a little misleading to cite the voluntary aided system as saying something about Catholic schools in particular.



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: ZIPMATT

I have a feeling that you were intending on writing more and that your post was truncated.

In general, I see that Catholic funding for education has had a positive influence upon the societies where it is implemented.

I can also see that there has been abuse occurring within that framework, and which hasn't been either prevented or prosecuted because of the either the naivety or culpability of those who were in the position to take action. That being said, considering the number of Catholic institutions, the incidence seems on par with secular institutions (who are more reactive and effective in prevention and prosecution).

As far as indoctrination goes, undoubtedly there has been some but that is moderated against the number of dissenters who have also come from the same educational system, and against the increasing secularization of educational curricula.

Because of the inclusiveness and compliance with government educational standards and curriculum, I really don't think that religious schools have been shown to create mindlessly indoctrinated drones. The outcomes of religiously funded education have produced a wide variety of well rounded, educated people with varied political opinions and preferences.

You can tell a tree by its fruits.

edit on 30/8/2018 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

That's a fair point , but the point was put across that aided Catholic schools get (only) 90% of funding from the state .Overall this is for basic establishment of the fact that Catholics provide schools and governments pay them to do so.

It should also be added but ran out of space :




Private schools, also known as independent schools are not managed by local, state or national governments. They instead may select their students and are funded in whole or in part by the tuition fees charged to students, rather than relying on the government as public schools do. Students may also get scholarships to enter into a private school depending on the student’s talent.[citation needed]


In all other Catholic schools then , the government supplies the children (on a non-selection basis) and (the vast majority of) the funding , and the Catholics supply everything else
edit on 30-8-2018 by ZIPMATT because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: ZIPMATT
But this again applies to, and was originally intended for, Church of England schools. It is not specifically a Catholic thing.

Incidentally, the character limit on ATS posts is 7413 characters, including spaces (I learned this the hard way). You may find that useful another time.



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 03:36 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

You're getting somewhere near the point but this is a sensitive issue , and no offence is intended in general . Where you say 'Catholic funding' yes there is some funding from the church , which may be of benefit

But the vast majority of money is paidto the Catholics which own the schools

but moreover, 'Catholic control' of schools and their internal systems is under question as well .

Many people have seen that within that framework of Catholic Control there is no check or balance against abuse , but that the system and the schools themselves are there to promote abuse , to make abuse possible , and as you say , to indoctrinate people into the anal places of a strange belief system .

It's not been by naiivity or by the neglect of responsibility that it is this way , quite the opposite , its been by the scheming and devilish plans of a nefarious hierarchy of molester for many years , hundreds at least .

Its the same Catholic church which burned men alive for being falsely labelled heretics , eg the Oxford Martyrs .

You say the products of Catholic schools are not mindlessly indoctrinated drones , yet perhaps we all are the mindless indoctrinated drones who pay a bizarre institution run as an absolute monarchy with the rights of a country from the Vatican , with public money , to oversee these children's lives , on an ongoing basis !



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 03:42 PM
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originally posted by: ZIPMATT


In all other Catholic schools then , the government supplies the children (on a non-selection basis) and (the vast majority of) the funding , and the Catholics supply everything else


Like the people needed to rape said children.

People ask why priests don't get arrested on par with the numbers of children that get molested. What you just said that I quoted is exactly the reason why. The governments supply the victims and the church supplies the criminals. A pedophile ring if there ever was one.



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: DeepImpactX

It appears we have indeed run across some dodgy territory , from a cursory examination of facts , put in the light of concurrent issues which are deeply affecting Catholicism . While the general public across at least the western world look on with disapproval , Catholics are becoming ex-Catholics in droves . Take a look at the speech made by Mr Bergoglio the pope at St.Peters Square this Easter2018 - which was largely empty in comparison to previous years' similar events . There were many asian visitors in the crowd , but hardly any Romans
This trend eventually will leave just the paid hierarchy, who'll then require rent-a-crowd just to look legitimate anymore .
Meanwhile its only going to be marshy ground ahead for any owners, governors and priests and teachers in every Catholic school , the entire world over . People are looking at them and they're saying like , "wtf"
edit on 30-8-2018 by ZIPMATT because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 05:46 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
Because of the inclusiveness and compliance with government educational standards and curriculum, I really don't think that religious schools have been shown to create mindlessly indoctrinated drones. The outcomes of religiously funded education have produced a wide variety of well rounded, educated people with varied political opinions and preferences.

I always say that I was raised Catholic, and that's why I'm an atheist.



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 06:44 PM
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Leaving the Catholicism out, the schools themselves save government a lot of money and people are happy to send their children to them for a better education

In Australia (60s?) the government decided not to fund Catholic education so catholic schools closed on mass, every one of them shut their doors on the first day of the year
Obviously the public schools were overrun with students and the government backed down and granted the church money
That's history



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 06:48 PM
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I think one should understand when paying property taxes here in Canada you state which school division you want your money to go to.

It’s the same property taxes that fund both school systems, so I think it’s great that there is a choice. Yes, they are also both subsidized by the government, but the civil property taxes do have an impact.

More choices should be given, and I think President Trump had those ideas in his campaign platform.
edit on 30-8-2018 by Sheye because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 07:18 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: chr0naut
Because of the inclusiveness and compliance with government educational standards and curriculum, I really don't think that religious schools have been shown to create mindlessly indoctrinated drones. The outcomes of religiously funded education have produced a wide variety of well rounded, educated people with varied political opinions and preferences.

I always say that I was raised Catholic, and that's why I'm an atheist.


There ya' go.



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 08:23 PM
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originally posted by: ZIPMATT
a reply to: chr0naut

You're getting somewhere near the point but this is a sensitive issue , and no offence is intended in general . Where you say 'Catholic funding' yes there is some funding from the church , which may be of benefit

But the vast majority of money is paidto the Catholics which own the schools

but moreover, 'Catholic control' of schools and their internal systems is under question as well .

Many people have seen that within that framework of Catholic Control there is no check or balance against abuse , but that the system and the schools themselves are there to promote abuse , to make abuse possible , and as you say , to indoctrinate people into the anal places of a strange belief system .

It's not been by naiivity or by the neglect of responsibility that it is this way , quite the opposite , its been by the scheming and devilish plans of a nefarious hierarchy of molester for many years , hundreds at least .

Its the same Catholic church which burned men alive for being falsely labelled heretics , eg the Oxford Martyrs .

You say the products of Catholic schools are not mindlessly indoctrinated drones , yet perhaps we all are the mindless indoctrinated drones who pay a bizarre institution run as an absolute monarchy with the rights of a country from the Vatican , with public money , to oversee these children's lives , on an ongoing basis !


Perhaps I should explain a little of my situation.

I am a Christian, but have never been to a religious school. Nor am I a Catholic. My children attended a non-Catholic Christian school when they were primary school age but in secondary school, they attended state schools. None of my children are currently church going and that is their decision.

My father is also a devout Christian and not a Catholic but he was a teacher at a Catholic (Marist Brothers) school for several years, where he taught Computer Aided Drafting, general computing (word processing and spreadsheets), computer animation and Industrial Arts.

At no stage did anyone from the Catholic Church bully or pressure me or my father. Nor do I consider Catholicism a "strange belief system". As far as I am concerned, the Pope is just another Christian.

As far as funding goes, here's a link from Wikipedia.

I think that the Catholic church must properly address the abuse issues and that pressure is being brought to bear in that regard.

At the same time, I have worked in secular schools and suspect, from staff room talk, that there is a significant under-reported level of sexual abuse there too.

Even in the press there are occasional reports of teachers being caught (strangely, most of them are of female teachers having underage lovers, something that I have believe is probably a very rare occurrence. I.e: the MSM reporting sensationalizes the salacious - priests and cougars grab more copy than grubby little predators).



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 08:47 PM
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a reply to: ZIPMATT

This is good to know. Thank you for your perspective.




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