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Gun controllers, this is why we don't store firearms in a common area

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posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:24 PM
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One of the more bizarre attacks on the second amendment (which protects private ownership of firearms, among other facets of RKBA) involves a plan to force Citizens to store their firearms (or in some variations, just their "assault" weapons) in a common area or "militia armory"

Despite the obvious ramifications such an idea holds for the Constitutionally protected RKBA, some advocates have persisted. This idea is bad for several primary reasons, including: 1) You won't have the weapon within arms reach when you need it and 2) it invites tampering, theft or coordinated disarmament (ie: you only have to control a single armory vs. door-to-door fighting)

Here is a real life example of the problem (either due to coordinated criminal activity or corrupt insider activity - both are equally large problems)

www.rt.com...

Say what? Paraguay’s police rifles replaced with replicas by thieves


The rifle issue came to light last week, when the police admitted that at least 42 FN FAL rifles went missing from its armory in the city of Capiatá. The rifles has been held in storage as they were replaced with new models of smaller caliber. The stolen weapons were still operational.

The rifles began appearing on the black market last year, which prompted the country’s military to investigate and ultimately led to gun-by-gun inventory checks within the police force. It was then discovered that 42 rifles in the Capiatá police inventory were actually plastic and wooden replicas.


Idea dismissed. No need for changes when the current system works just fine
(although we need to work toward continuing to destroy regulations)

edit on 8/30/2018 by JBurns because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: JBurns



Here is a real life example of the problem (either due to coordinated criminal activity or corrupt insider activity - both are equally large problems)


It's good that you acknowledge the fact that the US is rife with the same



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:30 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: JBurns



Here is a real life example of the problem (either due to coordinated criminal activity or corrupt insider activity - both are equally large problems)


It's good that you acknowledge the fact that the US is rife with the same


I read somewhere that most countries with people have those problems.



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: JBurns



Here is a real life example of the problem (either due to coordinated criminal activity or corrupt insider activity - both are equally large problems)


It's good that you acknowledge the fact that the US is rife with the same


I read somewhere that most countries with people have those problems.


You mean countries where guns are like chocolate bars



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum

originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: JBurns



Here is a real life example of the problem (either due to coordinated criminal activity or corrupt insider activity - both are equally large problems)


It's good that you acknowledge the fact that the US is rife with the same


I read somewhere that most countries with people have those problems.


You mean countries where guns are like chocolate bars


Eh, I don't have any gripes.

It's kinda nice being able to get chocolate bars and guns in the same place.
edit on 30-8-2018 by CriticalStinker because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: JBurns
It sounds like a stupid idea to me because only law abiding citizens will use the enforced storage facilities. All criminally held guns will still be involved in crimes, but then the householder is screwed as they can no longer grab their tool of choice in a home invasion.
I'm a Brit so don't have a dog in the fight but if I was a legal firearm owning US citizen I'd be dead against such a ridiculous and pointless change in law.

edit on 30-8-2018 by CornishCeltGuy because: typo



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum

originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: JBurns



Here is a real life example of the problem (either due to coordinated criminal activity or corrupt insider activity - both are equally large problems)


It's good that you acknowledge the fact that the US is rife with the same


I read somewhere that most countries with people have those problems.


You mean countries where guns are like chocolate bars


Eh, I don't have any gripes.

It's kinda nice being able to get chocolate bars and guns in the same place.


Chocolate guns would still be safer



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:42 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum

originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum

originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: JBurns



Here is a real life example of the problem (either due to coordinated criminal activity or corrupt insider activity - both are equally large problems)


It's good that you acknowledge the fact that the US is rife with the same


I read somewhere that most countries with people have those problems.


You mean countries where guns are like chocolate bars


Eh, I don't have any gripes.

It's kinda nice being able to get chocolate bars and guns in the same place.


Chocolate guns would still be safer


Tell that to the obesity and diabetes rates that dwarf homicide by guns.

If you only looked at innocent people killed by firearms in the US, it's nothing out of the normal.

I'll be the first to admit we have a gang/drug problem in the US, which is where you'll find most of the homicides.

If you're a law abiding citizen, you should be more worried about driving a car than being shot.



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:43 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum

originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum

originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: JBurns



Here is a real life example of the problem (either due to coordinated criminal activity or corrupt insider activity - both are equally large problems)


It's good that you acknowledge the fact that the US is rife with the same


I read somewhere that most countries with people have those problems.


You mean countries where guns are like chocolate bars


Eh, I don't have any gripes.

It's kinda nice being able to get chocolate bars and guns in the same place.


Chocolate guns would still be safer

Hmm, doesn't obesity kill more US citizens than gunshot injuries?
I think your chocolate guns would be a much more evil silent killer and should be locked up in official storage units.


EDIT
We thought the same about obesity lol
edit on 30-8-2018 by CornishCeltGuy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:44 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum

originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum

originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: JBurns



Here is a real life example of the problem (either due to coordinated criminal activity or corrupt insider activity - both are equally large problems)


It's good that you acknowledge the fact that the US is rife with the same


I read somewhere that most countries with people have those problems.


You mean countries where guns are like chocolate bars


Eh, I don't have any gripes.

It's kinda nice being able to get chocolate bars and guns in the same place.


Chocolate guns would still be safer


Death by chocolate.....🤔



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

I take it then in 1998 you marched the streets of the UK when the law in our country was changed, is it so unreasonable to keep something which is designed to harm someone in safe conditions, hell we have to store certain building materials correctly(COSHH)to keep people safe.



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:47 PM
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I've got a better solution, chocolate bullets



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:52 PM
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I do think with guns come responsibility and when we see cases of people having their gun with easy access and end up with someone(s) shot because of it I think some pretty heavy penalizes/jail time should apply. I have a lot of guns and I also have a big safe that only myself and wife know the combo to. I also have two handguns outside of the safe but they are also secured in a way that only myself or wife can get to, and all my ammo is in the safe too. I can get a handgun ready to use in seconds without the fear that my kids can get it too and everything else is always under my supervision. This is all with kids that have great mental stability, so if that was not the case I would have even tighter control.



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: UpIsNowDown
Lol, I get what you are saying fella, but I was answering as if I was a US citizen. UK law has it's own thing going on and I didn't want to derail with a classic comparison argument. Apples and Oranges n all that.
IF I was a US citizen I'd be against this law. A communal storage area away from their own homes, and in a world where criminals at lower levels often use firearms, hell yes, I'd want mine next to my bed, not in the local authority armoury.



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: Zcustosmorum

I do indeed


I have no illusions about our crime/corruption problems within the US
edit on 8/30/2018 by JBurns because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: Xtrozero

I don't necessarily believe in "easy access" either, but I do believe in having the weapon on hand if needed. Any weapon I'm not carrying or using right that minute is locked in a very heavy, UL listed safe (TL-30 rating) that is anchored to a concrete floor. At night, my carry pistol is locked in a biometric container also bolted in place

I just don't believe having them stored away from home (or in a mandated location at all) though. Anyhow, thanks for sharing your POV here
Glad to see another gun owner who takes them seriously
edit on 8/30/2018 by JBurns because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: UpIsNowDown

A firearm will not harm someone in safe conditions. Provided all basic rules of firearm safety are followed (you can count them on one hand) they are perfectly safe and completely harmless.

If the basic rules of safety are followed, your weapon will never be aiming at anything you don't intend to shoot. Reasons to shoot include: an immediate credible threat to your life or the life of another person

You are mistaking their design purpose (which as a tool is to serve a specific function) with something being inherently unsafe. Firearms are inanimate, and are safe provided they are always handled properly. That should not be mistaken for the effectiveness as a tool used to stop deadly attacks



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 01:11 PM
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originally posted by: CornishCeltGuy

Hmm, doesn't obesity kill more US citizens than gunshot injuries?
I think your chocolate guns would be a much more evil silent killer and should be locked up in official storage units.


EDIT
We thought the same about obesity lol


how many obese people are obese cause someone else throws food at them really really fast?



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Agreed
There is no real chance of this passing here, short of ratifying a new Constitutional amendment (which is difficult by any standard, but impossible in the current political climate)

It is unfortunate you guys do not have ready access to defensive tools (especially good ones like firearms) because I can see criminals exploiting the lack of firearms to victimize people. IMO a home invasion is one of the most frightening scenarios I can think of and trusting/hoping criminals victimize your neighbors/someone else is not a very good defensive strategy

That said there are parts in the US that have laws similar to the UK and other countries with some type of gun control laws. Although many if not all will be found unconstitutional by the Supreme Court, there is a chance some will remain. The truth is, I am unsure whether or not the increase in guns can be correlated to a decrease in crime here in the States or anything like that. But I can say for sure that those number of death reports reflect more criminals/attackers being killed than the good guys/potential victims

Anyhow thanks for replying to this thread
edit on 8/30/2018 by JBurns because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2018 @ 01:15 PM
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originally posted by: CornishCeltGuy
a reply to: UpIsNowDown
in a world where criminals at lower levels often use firearms, hell yes, I'd want mine next to my bed


Fair point never thought of it like that, which does kind of give credence to how we tackled gun crime in this country, crime will always exist, it always has, but lower level scum are not as tooled up




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