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Russia sets new launch date for long delayed ISS Nauka Module

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posted on Aug, 21 2018 @ 06:05 PM
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Nauka is something of a cursed module, I'd say. It was originally built as a backup to the Zarya module NASA paid for and the the Russians built. When it was no longer needed, because Zarya has been working out beautifully, the Russians rebuilt it as a new science module. Then they put it in storage. When they decided they actually wanted to put it in orbit, they ran it through more testing. They found a few problems. By the time they fixed them, the propulsion system on the module was out of warranty (not kidding), so they had to replace that.

Now, after everything, the head of Roscosmos has stated the Nauka module will finally be launched...in November 2019.

This isn't the first time this has been announced and it ought to be noted, the original date for Nauka's launch was almost a decade prior.

We will just have to see.

www.parabolicarc.com...




posted on Aug, 21 2018 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: anzha

We should all have been launching modules every 6 months to a year since the thing has been up there and we would be on our way to colonization/ industrialization of low Earth orbit by now.

But lack of monies, bureaucracy, nevermind a proficient launch platform, wag the dogs tail.



posted on Aug, 21 2018 @ 06:55 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Interesting idea.

Let's play with it.

Each space agency in the ISS puts up a new module every 6 months since 1998. That's NASA, ESA, the Russians and the Japanese. That means we get 8 new modules per year and it has been 20 years (yes, really) since the first module went up, so we get 160 modules total.

Because not all modules can be built to be hab modules and the hab modules are designed for roughly 6 each, let's just say each module can support two people.

That means on orbit, the ISS would have a total of 320 people. If you meant two modules per year for the entire time, then it would have been 80 people. That's not a great colony for the amount of money spent.

*shrugs*



posted on Aug, 22 2018 @ 04:12 AM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: anzha

We should all have been launching modules every 6 months to a year since the thing has been up there and we would be on our way to colonization/ industrialization of low Earth orbit by now.

The ISS is pretty much a colony already; there is a permanent human presence there, with individual astronauts typically spending half a year up there. It's a space lab, with experiments ranging from biology to physics and material science.

I'd say that's very impressive already, and simply adding a whole bunch of other modules and crew members to the ISS won't have much point.



posted on Aug, 22 2018 @ 09:05 AM
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a reply to: anzha

Let's assume they don't all need to be connected to the one structure or ISS, we should have 10 stations, or 100, all serving a different purpose.

Not colonizing low earth orbit equates to longer time to colonize the Moon and Mars when we do decide to get our act together. *shrugs*



posted on Aug, 22 2018 @ 09:07 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Very impressive but we need more, modules stations and infostructure up there, stands to reason should we actually wish to go anywhere with people.



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