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Freemasons Built Masterpiece in Canada

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posted on Feb, 22 2005 @ 12:26 PM
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Manitoba's legislature might be more than a symbol of government provincial authority. According to a University of Winnipeg researcher Frank Albo, who believes the building, which was completed in 1920 (coincidentally the very day that the planets Venus and Mercury were in alignment) after a decade of construction that tripled over the budget, is like some sort of talisman for divine energy built by Freemasons in Canada.

Researcher probes occult at Manitoba legislature

www.uwinnipeg.ca...

Coolness...




posted on Feb, 22 2005 @ 02:43 PM
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that is one stunning looking building

no wonder Albo (the guy in the first article) finds more things everytime he goes in there. i could spend at least a day gawping around at it



posted on Feb, 22 2005 @ 03:00 PM
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Awesome find dude, I wonder how much we can dig up on it... I don't have time right now but I will do some digging around tonight and see if I can find some more info. I'll be interested to see what if anything our resident Masons have to add to this thread... Hopefully the damned trolls will take a break.


Good stuff!


Here's another article that Qui Bono posted in another thread... it says basically the same thing though.


www.canoe.ca...

[edit on 2/22/05 by The Axeman]



posted on Feb, 22 2005 @ 03:39 PM
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That is pretty cool!
But the Parliament Building in Saskatchewan is the absolute crown of jewels when talking architecture in Western Canada.



posted on Feb, 22 2005 @ 05:24 PM
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This 'Masterpiece' is a real testament to the Native Heritage of our Country, as well as what makes it unique, its cultural diversity, and of course, the great Outdoors.

Oh wait, no this is just a tribute to Greek gods and goddesses and White culture, sorry. Can't blame the architects for being single minded, they were self-acknowledge Masons, therefore their beliefs should be extolled.

Why does Moses have 'horns'


And why is a Snake coming out of the Sphinx's third eye?



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 05:26 AM
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Originally posted by akilles


Why does Moses have 'horns'


If you studied (which you never do), you would be aware that up until the Reformation, Moses was always depicted as horned. The Latin Vulgate bible which was the basis of all bibles until the Reformation refers to Moses on his decent from Mount Sinai as having horns. There is some confusion over wether the Vulgate is correct but the word is present in the original Hebrew.
Moses would have been no stranger to the use of horns within religion. Coming out of Egypt where they were commonplace, it is entirely possible that he adopted them for his new belief system.
The horns themselves can be interpreted in many ways but probably the two most accepted are that they depict the betrayal of Moses by Israel when he ascended Mount Sinai. This was the time that the tribes reverted to worshipping the Golden Calf.
The other explanation given is that the horns depict Moses' destruction of the Golden Calf and his assuming of it's mantle. By doing so, the tribes were coerced into following Yaweh through him - he had taken the symbol belonging to the earlier god and it had come to represent his own. The people would follow the new god easier as it contained a symbol of the last.
The horns in medieval art are therefore a symbol of power. This is the same symbolism that they have been endowed with since time immemorial.

There is some argument over the translation of the Vulgate, but certainly, horns play a major part in the Bible and of religion before Christ - altars to Yaweh and other gods of the time were often depicted with horns. Any depiction is also (and probably more) relevant to those ancient religions, and is therefore totally and utterly contrary to your ignorant, racist claim that it's "just a tribute to Greek gods and goddesses and White culture".

Probably the most famous horned Moses is the statue by Michaelangelo which was used as the centerpiece of Pope Julius’ II tomb and now stands in the Church of St Peter in Rome.


home1.gte.net...

The above link explains how the "horned" Moses came about and it's impact and use in art throughout the ages.
Don't click it though, akilles. I'd hate for you to actually have to learn something.

[edit on 23-2-2005 by Leveller]



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 11:49 AM
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Yeah, don't assume I asked because I want to learn again
.

I obviously want other people to think about, so well done Leveller.

If it made it easier to worship Moses 3000 years ago, why does he STILL have horns? Just sticking to tradition, or is he to be forever remembered as being the 'horned one'.

Also, if you are portraying Moses how the Pagans viewed their Gods, are you extolling Christianity?



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 12:08 PM
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Originally posted by akilles

Also, if you are portraying Moses how the Pagans viewed their Gods, are you extolling Christianity?


Leveller can certainly speak for himself, but the above comment gripes me. After all, the purpose of Leveller's above posts was to correct akilles' errors, not to "extol Christianity".

[edit on 23-2-2005 by Masonic Light]



posted on Feb, 23 2005 @ 12:10 PM
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Originally posted by akilles
Yeah, don't assume I asked because I want to learn again
.

I obviously want other people to think about, so well done Leveller.

If it made it easier to worship Moses 3000 years ago, why does he STILL have horns? Just sticking to tradition, or is he to be forever remembered as being the 'horned one'.

Also, if you are portraying Moses how the Pagans viewed their Gods, are you extolling Christianity?


If you wanted to learn then why make the ignorant statements that you did and try to present them as fact?
And no. I'm not extolling or denigrating Christianity. For myself I see Moses as being more relevant to Judaism rather than Christianity. But either way, one cannot deny historical evolution of religion and Christianity is entwined into the subject matter by it's link to Judaism.
You seem to be hung up on the fact that Moses may have existed 3000 years ago and that because of this the horn reference is outdated. This has no bearing on the art form as I've already pointed out that the Biblical reference to it was valid right up until the Reformation. You may want to change your statement to read "500 years ago". Rather less than you interpret it to be.
I see the reference to the horns as being the artist's attempt to emulate past artistic greatness - as I've already stated, the horned Moses was depicted by some of the greatest artists who ever lived. I also believe that the horned Moses is symbollic of the physical power and justice that is supposed to be incorporated within the building itself.

As I've already stated, the fact that Moses is depicted as horns doesn't necessarily make him pagan. That's not unless you view the Jewish religion as being founded in paganism. It certainly does not seem to be a reference to Pan or any Greek god. The horned figure was a far more relevant symbol to the proto-Jews and early Hebrews than you may have realised.

Incidentally, there is no reference to Satan having horns in the Bible. They were probably added later due to the red horned dragon in Revelation 12:3. Again, they probably allude to power.

[edit on 23-2-2005 by Leveller]



posted on Feb, 25 2005 @ 08:39 PM
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It is a truly fascinating and beautiful building. Too bad it's in Winnipeg!

The City that God forgot....

Unless urban decay, mosquito's, cold winters (Winterpeg), floods, and militant Native Gangs are your idea of fun, study this building from afar.

A sad, former jewel of the west, Winnipeg is now just a sad, crappy, dying city. Seems the occult nature of the legislature didnt work.



posted on Mar, 6 2005 @ 11:08 AM
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Being from manitoba, I saw this on the local news last month, it was interesting to say the least. A few interesting facts about the building is that the number 13 is repeated lots. The 3 main staircases inside the building have 3 rows of 13 steps ect. Also at the bottom of this hole

www.uwinnipeg.ca...

....there is a black star, of which, if you stand in the middle of it, you cannot hear an echo. Is the black star a symbol of masons?
I haven't been to Winnipeg since Oct (vanhalen concert). Even though its the murder cap. of the country, it's not that bad of a place. Lot's of culture and alot of cool buildings



posted on Mar, 6 2005 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by scar
Is the black star a symbol of masons?



No. Quite the opposite.
The only star in Masonic symbolism is a bright one.



posted on Mar, 6 2005 @ 03:07 PM
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Originally posted by akilles
And why is a Snake coming out of the Sphinx's third eye?



It is a symbol of The Kundalini being raised.

And no; this is not Satanic.

It is said that in Ancient Kemet, there were many Masters of The Right Hand Path.

It is only Satanic, when one engages these studies and practices without forsaking fornication and Egoism/Egotism.....



PEACE

[edit on 6-3-2005 by Tamahu]



posted on Mar, 7 2005 @ 04:36 PM
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Originally posted by Leveller

Originally posted by akilles


Why does Moses have 'horns'


If you studied (which you never do), you would be aware that up until the Reformation, Moses was always depicted as horned. The Latin Vulgate bible which was the basis of all bibles until the Reformation refers to Moses on his decent from Mount Sinai as having horns.



Would that equate Moses with the ancient God Pan? How come Masons seem to know more about the Bible than Christians do? I have never heard of the latin Vulgate Bible.



posted on Mar, 7 2005 @ 04:47 PM
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Originally posted by TgSoe
Would that equate Moses with the ancient God Pan? How come Masons seem to know more about the Bible than Christians do? I have never heard of the latin Vulgate Bible.


No. With Pan, the horns were an actual physical part of him. Whereas with Moses, they were probably part of a head-dress. Also, Moses was only ever proclaimed as a prophet of his god, never a god himself, unlike Pan.

As for the Vulgate Bible?

www.fourmilab.ch...

Before the translators really got to work in the English language, the Vulgate was considered to be the Bible.

www.gotquestions.org...



posted on Mar, 7 2005 @ 09:08 PM
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That must be the reason that Crowley said you can't really learn anything without knowing latin.( Something like that I cant remember) Perhaps there were a lot of writings in Latin of great importance. I imagine a lot of knowlege has been hidden from the general population.



posted on Mar, 8 2005 @ 05:00 AM
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Well in the context of the Bible, there are three languages that are important.
For the Old Testament: Aramaic. For the New: Greek and Latin.

There seem to be a lot of misinterpretations that have come down to us through the generations because of mistranslations of certain words in these languages and they have been accepted as the true meanings, even though a cross check with the original language proves them to be false.

You have to understand that knowledge isn't hidden in this way. These books were written in these languages because they were the norm for the day. Up until quite recently, even English versions of the Bible were a rarity. Only the rich could afford them and the literacy rate was very poor. Add to that the Church's protection of literary dogma and Bible study was almost impossible a couple of hundred years ago. Nowadays we have the advantage of being literate ourselves and we also have people who study and publish their work of the original languages. And, with the availability of information on the internet, there really has never been a better time to study the Bible.

And this returns us to the subject here. When we uncover things like the horned Moses, we are sometimes shocked. We believe these things to be recent additions to the religion. What we don't realise is that they are age old interpretations that have been pushed aside for centuries. With the horned Moses, we actually have a puzzle in itself. The word for "horns" is pretty similar to that for "shining" in Hebrew. There are some scholars who claim that the horned imterpretation is a mistake in itself. But I would prefer to look at the evidence. The bull figure was very powerful in the proto-Judaic religion. We know from the Bible that the people revered it and we know that at exactly the time that Moses ascended the mountain they were worshipping it. I therefore tend to sway towards the horned headress theory. There is plenty of evidence that this sort of thing goes on in religion - even today, you only have to look at shamans in some of the Asian and South American religions to see a similar use of animal and nature symbolism.



posted on Mar, 8 2005 @ 05:48 PM
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I think the problem is, people know its the ORIGINAL way of depicting Moses.

They wonder why we STILL depict him in this manner. They wonder if they ever knew the reason at all, merely that is how it is.

I saw the horns, and did not think they were a recent addition at all, I'd say that would only make sense if people knew why the horns were a recent addition.

Otherwise, wouldn't they assume it belonged?



posted on Mar, 8 2005 @ 06:16 PM
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Originally posted by akilles
I think the problem is, people know its the ORIGINAL way of depicting Moses.

They wonder why we STILL depict him in this manner. They wonder if they ever knew the reason at all, merely that is how it is.

I saw the horns, and did not think they were a recent addition at all, I'd say that would only make sense if people knew why the horns were a recent addition.

Otherwise, wouldn't they assume it belonged?



Well akilles, if you knew anything about the subject, which evidently you don't, you would know that in art, the horned Moses is a relatively new depiction dating back only as far as medieval times. In the context of Moses a couple of hundred years is certainly recent when compared with 3000.

Obviously, with your question of "why does Moses still have horns?" and then your statement above claiming that you know the reason why, we have yet another little contradiction. Would you like to tell us why Moses is depicted with horns?



posted on Mar, 8 2005 @ 06:24 PM
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Keep your head up, Leveller. It'll be ok.

Actually, while you have your head up, LOOK up.

Do you see the stars, assuming you chose to look out a window (otherwise look up and imagine).

Mithraism, Judaism, Christianity. Each one had an 'age' of there own. Its referred to as the Zodiac.

I assume if Moses was alive (or symbolically represented to have been alive at a certain time) it was at the dawn of the Age of Aries, out of the Age of Taurus. So the horns would be a Mithraic 'throwback', completely explaining its presence in Masonic religious sculpture.



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