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$500 million lottery ticket claimed anonymously - how is this possible?

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posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 03:46 AM
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So we had one of the largest powerball drawings this year and was just under $500 million. The prize went about a month before "being claimed" and it was really odd because they let it go down to the last minute to claim it. The lottery put out an official notice that a "trust" claimed the winning and no information is revealed and it is never spoken of again. An attorney "representing the trust" signed the documents claiming the prize and is not revealing his clients. I understand that from the lawyers point of view, but I think this shouldn't be legal, to use a company or trust to accept a lottery winning. It should only be able to be claimed by a real, live, living, breathing person and must be done in a "public manner", able and eligible for viewed and review by the public.

How do we know that this isn't another "lottery heist" like was tried in the same office the 80's? Maybe the people learned from the mistakes and gave it another go, for 1/2 a billion bucks, I'm sure there would be a few people willing to step over the line.

Every day I get more disgusted with this country.



+5 more 
posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 03:57 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

I guess with a half a billion prize there are some wealthy people who can afford to chip in a few thousand $$ each and buy a lot of tickets. Call it a 'Trust' and split the pot whenever they win. It'd be way better if a group of normal folk won the prize and we'll never know.


ETA - I'm a big believer in lottery winners having the right to privacy.

edit on 8.18.2018 by Kandinsky because: (no reason given)


+7 more 
posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 05:13 AM
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I always planned that if I ever won big in the lottery, the first thing I would do is go to a good lawyer and set up a trust to claim it.
Can't honestly think of a reason anyone wouldn't do that really.


+7 more 
posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 05:26 AM
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originally posted by: caterpillage
I always planned that if I ever won big in the lottery, the first thing I would do is go to a good lawyer and set up a trust to claim it.
Can't honestly think of a reason anyone wouldn't do that really.

+1

You'd be nuts to announce to the world you just fell into ten million, let alone more.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 05:38 AM
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In Japan, when you win the lottery, you go to the lottery station of purchase if possible, it is then verified, then you go to Mizuho bank and cash in your ticket. No one speaks who the lottery ticket winner is, if they do, they get fired immediately. Good system actually. And it is tax free. I know. Even the city tax that are tax on people is exempt.
edit on 0800000046382018-08-18T05:38:46-05:00384608am5 by musicismagic because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 05:58 AM
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A trust is used to save on your tax liability.

Also hiding your identity.

The best option for winning the lottery is taking the annuity.

Guaranteed yearly payments, and you get more of your winnings.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 06:09 AM
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Id do that in a heartbeat. You would have to kill all your social media and move as all your 1st-20th cousins would be puttin in claims.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 06:11 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

I think a person or group of people should have the right to stay anonymous as long as they are legit like the rest of us, however I do believe that wealthy people already are buying loads of tickets to prevent others who aren't so wealthy of becoming wealthy. I think anyone who already has a million in the bank should be banned from playing the lottery.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 06:15 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

If you don't set up a trust to claim large prizes your a fool. In fact you need to set up 2 of them a claiming trust and a bridge trust. The claiming trust can be obtained through the freedom of information act. So it immediately transfers the money to a bridge trust and the claiming trust is revoked. This way if reporters or con men try to track down the winner they discover a closed trust. And without access to the trust they have no clue where the money went.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 06:36 AM
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Wow, this is amazing that people think that I was upset that someone set up a trust for the money. Is that really what you take away from the saying that someone "walking, talking, living, breathing" should have to claim it in person publicly? That doesn't mean that they can't put it in a trust, it just means the public needs to know it isn't rigged by the lottery board or that the $ isn't being stolen by politicians or embezzeled by other people.

But NOOOOO. Let's all talk about "what I would do if I won, I'd set up a trust!!!".

Sad.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 07:14 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Call me cynical, but the fact that they waited until the last minute to claim the prize anonymously wreaks of some sort of dishonesty. Is this a way for the state or one of it's employees to get the lottery money? Something isn't right here.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 07:16 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Are you referring to the New Hampshire winner who wanted to remain anonymous? If I recall correctly, earlier this spring a New Hampshire woman won half a billion and wanted to stay anonymous, but the state statutes governing lottery winnings required the winning ticket to be signed. Signing “anonymous” wasn’t gonna cut it and the state was gonna forfeit her winnings on those grounds, so the suits got involved and a trust was the answer.

I’m up early on a Saturday and the weather sucks, so I could be totally off and nothing of the sort ever happened...

ETA: Speaking of lottery heists, did you ever play McDonalds’ Monopoly game piece promotion/lottery? Yeah, it was totally rigged: Mickey D’s Monopoly Racket — Do Not Pass GO. Do Not Collect $200.
edit on 18-8-2018 by BeefNoMeat because: Where the f$ck is my Park Place game piece?

edit on 18-8-2018 by BeefNoMeat because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-8-2018 by BeefNoMeat because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 07:19 AM
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The problem with the identity of the winner being given away is sort of a touchy subject in my opinion.

On one hand, I would not want to be named if I won. I live in a very violent area and I also come from a poor family. I'd have a million reasons to wish to keep that sort of stuff as private as I can.

On another hand, you're right. What stops anyone from falsifying a legitimate win if there doesn't have to be any proof.

This is why I don't even bother with the lottery. I do like scratch offs though.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 07:42 AM
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I can't believe some people here are claiming that wealthy people or groups of wealthy people are 'rigging' the lottery by buying bulk tickets.
It doesn't work like that, at all.

Take this scenario, one group buys ALL the tickets. Guaranteed win, right?
Wrong, guaranteed loss.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 07:47 AM
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There has been constant lawsuits and litigation over this subject. It is an area I've always been interested in and followed with great interest...as I plan on winning the lottery some day!! (grin)

As I understand it, laws vary from state to state on whether claimants need to identify themselves and/or appear in person to claim the prize.

I have formulated my plan for when I win (notice I said 'when' and not 'if') (bigger grin), so I won't go into those details here, but suffice it to say, I will (insert series of bleeps here)...and that will be that.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 07:51 AM
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Hey I won a 1000 yen today playing the lottery, took the wife out to a sushi bar (rotating one) 2 pieces for 100 yen and dug into my pocket for 200 yen more and all was well with the cashier.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 07:53 AM
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originally posted by: pointessa
Call me cynical, but the fact that they waited until the last minute to claim the prize anonymously wreaks of some sort of dishonesty.


First, it wasn't the last minute, there were still weeks to go, second, it was due to the courts litigating this and allowing her to remain anonymous, third, this was back in March, why you crying about it now?



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 08:07 AM
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They have the right to privacy IMHO.

I don't need some jilted ex-gf trumping up fake claims and threatening to sue me when I win.

I believe in most states the lottery office and treasurer's office must certify that it is a living breathing person claiming the winnings.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 08:36 AM
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There's a REALLY EASY fix for all this, and it satisfies everyone. It passes the audit test, and it passes the anonymity test at the same time.

1. Still require a "living / breathing claimant" to claim the prize, but do not force them to be photographed by the media.

2. Classify the personal information about the winner as HIPAA. Therefore, the info is not subject to FOIA laws.

Game, Set and Match!
edit on 8/18/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 08:51 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof


Why should someone have to give up their anonymity for winning the lottery? I am sorry I disagree with you you should be able to remain anonymous.




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