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The day the Knights Templar marched through Seattle

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posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 11:16 AM
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The Seattle I grew up in during the 1970's is now unrecognizable- the landscape, people, and atmosphere have completely changed. My childhood home was on Queen Anne Hill just blocks from the iconic Space Needle and Seattle Center. The city was relatively clean, safe, quiet, and, I daresay, quaint. I enjoy reminiscing of those easier, happier, and less expensive days when you could get a cheeseburger, coke, and fries for $1 at Dick's Drive-In. The article and photos I am posting here are from quite a different time: 1925. The Smith Tower was the tallest building west of the Mississippi, and EVERYONE wore hats. The parade must have been an amazing sight, and I wish I could have been there to enjoy it!

SEATTLE TIMES SOURCE ARTICLE


THROUGH SEATTLE’S SO-FAR brief history (when compared to Jerusalem’s), one of the most flamboyant influxes into this well-defended city of about 77 hills came in late July 1925, when 30,000 “members and families” of — and the name is long — “The United Religious, Military and Masonic Orders of the Temple and of St. John of Jerusalem, Palestine, Rhodes and Malta of England and Wales and Its Provinces Overseas” came to town.



These Masons were better known as the Knights Templar, named for the medieval crusading Christians who attempted to break the Muslim grip on Jerusalem and most of the eastern Mediterranean. These 20th-century marching Protestants — mostly — reached Seattle by land and sea (but not quite yet by sky) for the “conclave of the grand encampment of the United States of America for the 36th Triennial of the Knights Templar.”


Surely the most enduring vestiges of these warriors — preachers, super-salesmen, educators, disciplined clerks, meatpackers and other ambitious Protestants — were their uniforms, which they took care to keep brushed. Make a quick online visit to “Knights Templar,” and you will be treated to a polished flood of fraternal regalia, most of it for sale: shoulder boards, sleeve and collar crosses, swords, pins of many sorts, stars centered with crosses, and chapeaus.


These chapeaus are the fancy plumed caps we see in our “Then” photo, heading east up Yesler Way from Second Avenue. Here the marching is in order, and you will not find any Mason out of line or step. They are moving up First Hill.


A cross is hanging over Yesler Way center-right, nearly lost in the shadows of First Hill. It is but one of scores of crosses the Templars raised in Seattle during their July visit. The largest sat atop the grand-sized welcome arch that covered the intersection of Second Avenue and Marion Street. The cross mounted on the roof of the then-brand-new Olympic Hotel competed with the cross on the welcome arch for dominance of the cityscape.



It is likely that these marchers were headed to their faux fort and headquarters constructed for their visit on City Hall Park, at the center of the photograph. The fort’s drawbridge on Terrace Street was manned by Boy Scouts, some of them, most likely, future knights.

SEATTLE TIMES SOURCE ARTICLE
edit on 8172018 by seattlerat because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 11:29 AM
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Little known Seattle fact. You can remember the order of the streets south to north with the phrase, "Jesus Christ made Seattle under protest."

Jefferson
James
Cherry
Columbia
Marion
Madison
Spring
Seneca
University
Union
Pike
Pine
edit on 8/17/2018 by schuyler because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 03:45 PM
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Those are not Templars.


Templars were wiped out and summarily executed across Europe centuries ago.


We call that Cosplay today.


I dont give a S*** whatever charity they think they do, either. Homeless people and starvation is still a huge thing and growing.



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 07:04 PM
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originally posted by: SR1TX
Those are not Templars.


Templars were wiped out and summarily executed across Europe centuries ago.


We call that Cosplay today.


I dont give a S*** whatever charity they think they do, either. Homeless people and starvation is still a huge thing and growing.

Are You sure they were "Wiped Out"? History might disagree...



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: SR1TX
Those are Knights Templar of the York Rite of Freemasonry. We take the name in commemoration of the medieval knights. We don't claim lineage.

The two main charities of the Knights Templar are the Knights Templar Eye Foundation and Knights Templar Holy Land Pilgrimage

Knights Templar Holy Land Pilgrimage: The mission of this charity is "to send ordained Christian ministers on a Biblical study and historical and cultural immersion experience who would not have the opportunity otherwise." It is hoped that this will strengthen their ministry as they are provided with a chance to walk around the Holy Land where Christ walked and take part in intensive study programs. Sir Knights from the local Commanderies submit nominations for a local minister to the Committee on Holy Land Pilgrimage of the Grand Commandery of their State. The State Committee reviews the nomination and selects the number of ministers they willing to send over based on funds available. Local Commanderies can choose to pay 100% of the costs and fully sponsor a minister. These selected nominations and 100% sponsored are then sent up to the Grand Encampment's Holy Land Pilgrimage Committee and this committee is responsible for the full funding of the ministers' travel.

Knights Templar Eye Foundation (KTEF): The most notable charity of the Knights Templar is the Eye Foundation which seeks "to improve vision through research, education, and supporting access to care." According to the Foundation:

The Knights Templar Eye Foundation is committed to support research that can help launch the careers of clinical or basic researchers committed to the prevention and cure of potentially blinding diseases in infants and children. We support clinical or basic research on conditions that can or may eventually be treated or prevented. Examples include but are not limited to amblyopia, congenital cataract, congenital glaucoma, retinopathy of prematurity, ocular malformations, congenital nystagmus, and other hereditary eye diseases such as retinal dystrophies or retinoblastoma.

The KTEF is committed to preserving sight and preventing blindness since its creation in 1955. Historically funding went to direct patient care as well as research and education, but with the recent passage of the Affordable Healthcare Act the mission and direction of the KTEF changed to solely funding research and education efforts.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 08:47 AM
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originally posted by: SR1TX
I dont give a S*** whatever charity they think they do, either. Homeless people and starvation is still a huge thing and growing.


Then go give homeless people some money and food.



posted on Aug, 18 2018 @ 04:19 PM
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originally posted by: SR1TX
Those are not Templars.


Templars were wiped out and summarily executed across Europe centuries ago.


We call that Cosplay today.


I dont give a S*** whatever charity they think they do, either. Homeless people and starvation is still a huge thing and growing.

Did you just confuse the "salvation army" with the "knights templar"?



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