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Mozilla / Firefox goes all in for EVIL

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posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:42 AM
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From OPs crappy source:

The Mozilla Foundation also pushed for so-called “net neutrality,” a total sham agenda that the tech giants was crucial to make sure you would never be blocked from the information sources you wanted to visit.
F**K everyone who is opposed to net neutrality! End of text.




posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:50 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

I remember thats when and why I switched.
Its hard to say for sure but I personally think that no matter how much they supress and control there will ALWAYS be means of privacy and secure communication, and I am not even referring to my link. IT never ends... I.T...


Use this


LINK

-Driver



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 01:19 AM
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I'm not convinced Google is "pure evil". I suspect the truth about Google is more nuanced than that.

Anyway, as far as browser alternatives to Chrome and Firefox, I'd honestly worry more about using a browser that undoubtedly attracts a lot of bad people than one almost everyone is using. Even if Chrome and Firefox are not particularly good for user privacy and so forth, they're designed to be fine for the average person.



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 03:24 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

sounds like some are finally starting to feel the pinch of the NWO agenda.

if anyone wants to know what the NWO agenda is just look up Dr Days 1969 talk entitled "Everything is in Place and No one Can Stop Us Now. There are over a hundred items in the list.

Only recently they rolled out one more when they attached employment to health care only a couple of months ago.



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 06:23 AM
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originally posted by: rollanotherone
I use start page.

Best choice out there!



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

This isn't evil, it's social responsibility. Untrustworthy information should not be promoted. That's why in years past, the people peddling outright lies would offer poorly xeroxed pamphlets on street corners, rather than being published in newspapers and books.

With the rise of the internet, those people are disguising themselves as legitimate sources of information, and so it's up to those who provide the tools to access information to keep things somewhat respectable.

Sites like InfoWars, Natural News, Before It's News, The Washington Times, Russia Today, and World Net Daily should not be allowed to distribute their lies.

There's nothing wrong with alternate points of view, but there's a responsibility for those views to be based on facts and reality. Not fiction.



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 11:57 AM
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originally posted by: watchitburn
a reply to: Metallicus

Use Opera.


That's still a thing? Had it 15 years ago. I'm sticking to Firefox. When I can. Some sites will disable access to certain browsers. That's a pisser.



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:00 PM
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Anonymity is every browsers pledge.... until they get popular and start rolling in the money. Then it's all over without you even knowing.

That's how they get ya. Ad blockers do the same. Read the fine print.


I hear the Onion browser is a good one but... the CIA/FBI will track you as a suspect of bad deeds as soon as you're detected using it, whether they can see what you do or not.


VPNs are the way to go. Even multiple
Might make you a little slow but they'll never know who/where you are.
edit on 17-8-2018 by StallionDuck because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: Tranceopticalinclined





Meshworked together via blockchains, ISPs and even more networking protocols yet to be established, but freedom will never die, infact, we have and will continue to gain even more freedoms for ourselves and for our other " silenced " brothers and sisters!


Mesh type networks, blockchain, and protocols are not free from the wrath of repealing net neutrality , existing legislation , or new legislation to prevent them from ever being effective.

Prior to repealing net neutrality they took measure for you to be legally responsible for traffic going through your network. They will use this to prevent effective mesh networks by fear of being held liable for Pgate material going through your network.

Net neutrality makes it legally for your ISP to target networks, data packets, and protocols and slow them down or block them all together. Along with already existing legislation its going to take more than blockchain or technology to overcome the control they have over the propaganda and freedom.

Repealing net neutrality and current legislation is enabling them to win and continue to win the cat and mouse game.


As for Firefox I'm not a big fan of FireCrash but they all have their weakness.
edit on 23831America/ChicagoFri, 17 Aug 2018 12:23:03 -0500000000p3142 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: StallionDuck




Onion browser

Tor has vulnerability with the exit nodes that could expose your anonymity .




VPNs are the way to go.


VPN aren't safe either unless you setup your own and even then you are likely to leave tracks.



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: dug88

Try

www.startpage.com...

Have heard a lot of good things


S/P privacy policy (excerpt):


www.startpage.com...

Startpage.com doesn’t log or share your personal information.
We don’t track you. We don’t profile you. Period.



www.startpage.com...

www.startpage.com...

Combine with free technology like TOR program, i2p, freenet, or trusted VPN providers. Any combination of those + start page can be used to deny others the ability to infringe on your private communications/browsing/etc.
edit on 8/17/2018 by JBurns because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: interupt42

But, a combination of multiple services + a major improvement in browsing/surfing habits will be more secure than not using any of those.

For instance TAILS->unlisted TOR bridge->TOR->VPN->Internet is fairly secure provided you follow all instructions and properly compartment browsing

...it also helps to look at the probable threat you're facing and who you are trying to deny access to. If you want to prevent nation-states from snooping, you will have to jump through some extra hoops. But if you're just trying to prevent ISP spying, private companies, cyber criminals, nosey neighbors, etc then they are much more effective.

Remember, as far as we know, NSA/GCHQ/etc has not defeated TOR and have not defeated modern encryption. Those things are still very good defenses against government spying and beyond, and I highly encourage others to use them. Fact is, the more people using these networks, operating bridges, operating anonymous VPN etc then everyone is safer.

edit on 8/17/2018 by JBurns because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:36 PM
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You guys are using the infowars browers?



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:40 PM
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a reply to: StallionDuck

The onion browser can be a problem, but the TAILS or even Qubes operating systems will mitigate a lot of those threats (aka "leaks")

For instance on some sites/forums, I sometimes connect using Qubes and TOR especially if posting political speech I don't want to associate with my real identity. On DU, as a good example, I don't want to risk being "Docked" by anybody and getting harassed at home for my political beliefs (as we've seen happen to many good Americans)

On ATS, for instance, I use a VPN but mostly just to protect my login (since ATS doesn't use HTTPs)

And on some other sites, I don't bother to use any of those things

I suppose privacy is a spectrum, and we all have to individually decide what level of surveillance we're willing to accept or what lengths well go to in order to deny others the ability to spy on us.

One thing is for certain, folks shouldn't even start looking down this road until they take care of the basics like learning good online habits, deleting your presence from social media, deleting your google account and clearing the search history, etc. I forget the exact number, but something like ~75% plus of government intelligence produce is derived from open sources (that includes social media!)

edit on 8/17/2018 by JBurns because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:50 PM
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originally posted by: interupt42
a reply to: StallionDuck




Onion browser

Tor has vulnerability with the exit nodes that could expose your anonymity .




VPNs are the way to go.


VPN aren't safe either unless you setup your own and even then you are likely to leave tracks.


I think I heard about Onion issues.
It was worth a shot


VPNs can be 'safe' or at very least, safer. But yeah, I agree. With routers and access points being infected and hosts spying on their users and selling customer information... Anonymity is more or less a dead and dying thing. Some of the best hackers out there have been getting busted for one thing or another, though most of it for stupidity and not being careful.

Privacy has gone belly up with no ability to resuscitate.



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 12:51 PM
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originally posted by: JBurns
a reply to: StallionDuck

The onion browser can be a problem, but the TAILS or even Qubes operating systems will mitigate a lot of those threats (aka "leaks")

For instance on some sites/forums, I sometimes connect using Qubes and TOR especially if posting political speech I don't want to associate with my real identity. On DU, as a good example, I don't want to risk being "Docked" by anybody and getting harassed at home for my political beliefs (as we've seen happen to many good Americans)

On ATS, for instance, I use a VPN but mostly just to protect my login (since ATS doesn't use HTTPs)

And on some other sites, I don't bother to use any of those things

I suppose privacy is a spectrum, and we all have to individually decide what level of surveillance we're willing to accept or what lengths well go to in order to deny others the ability to spy on us.

One thing is for certain, folks shouldn't even start looking down this road until they take care of the basics like learning good online habits, deleting your presence from social media, deleting your google account and clearing the search history, etc. I forget the exact number, but something like ~75% plus of government intelligence produce is derived from open sources (that includes social media!)



Nailed it!



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: JBurns




But, a combination of multiple services + a major improvement in browsing/surfing habits will be more secure than not using any of those.

Yes and NO. perhaps they are targeting and monitoring those that use tools to hide their tracks versus using more resources to tackle the more daunting task of monitor everyone. It could be a honeypot to identify who they need to worry about.




For instance TAILS->unlisted TOR bridge->TOR->VPN->Internet is fairly secure provided you follow all instructions and properly compartment browsing

Still got to lean on faith that one or more of those nodes hasn't been compromised.





Remember, as far as we know, NSA/GCHQ/etc has not defeated TOR and have not defeated modern encryption.

Faith but in reality it has been exploited to capture certain individuals.





Those things are still very good defenses against government spying and beyond, and I highly encourage others to use them.


If I were really worried about my anonymity it would take more than tech and proper use of tech to stay safe and really be anonymous.

Careful out there and where you put your faith on.





the more people using these networks, operating bridges, operating anonymous VPN etc then everyone is safer.


Yes and No. False sense of security can lead people to drop their guard.

But you are right its not bad to use and can protect your freedom of speech from the corporate business world .
However, I wouldn't count on those technology by themselves for a life or death type thing or once you become a target.

edit on 16831America/ChicagoFri, 17 Aug 2018 13:16:20 -0500000000p3142 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 01:16 PM
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originally posted by: Metallicus

originally posted by: schuyler
I read the article and watched the video. I do not find it credible. It's pure speculation of what Mozilla MIGHT do according to one guy who is jumping to conclusions before Mozilla has done anything. They are interested in fighting fake news. Anybody got a problem with that? And consider the source and its other articles.


The point is no one tells me what sites I can see and what I can’t. As long as it isn’t illegal I expect to be a free man and to engage in the free exchange of ideas.


Neither is Mozilla. The idea that they ARE is Fake News. It's not true. They've expressed a concern over fake news. That's all. Bear in mind that this is an open source project. The source code is freely available for you to check out. Try that with Chrome.



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: interupt42

Do you propose an alternative? Otherwise, your communications are 100% vulnerable to collection

I agree it is not perfect, but it is a far more secure proposition than unencrypted plain traffic.

And the problem with compromised nodes is not as big of a deal as it may seem off hand. For a compromised node to even be problematic, it has to be an "exit" node vs. an internal relaying node. And even then, it is only an issue if you don't follow best practices and have information that can be somehow correlated to your identity. Please correct me if I'm wrong as this is based on a general understanding of the technology/implementation, but I strongly support these privacy championing tools

To quote another user's answer


The first relay doesn't know where you're going, the last relay/exit node doesn't know where you're from, and the middle relay knows neither. That makes deanonymization nearly impossible, and makes onion routing so empowering.


Either way, I wouldn't be discouraging folks from using technology that is far better than unencrypted traffic.

At least if you live in the United States, it is your right to protect your data and communications from government (and otherwise) as you see fit. If you live in another part of the world (the non-free world) you can still use these technologies covertly but it involves using unlisted bridges, VPNs or freedom-supporting content delivery networks

I think there is a project bringing uncensored, encrypted and anonymous internet to parts of the world stricken by censorship or oppression.

But regardless of what attacks may exist, you will always be more secure when properly using this technology vs. when you aren't. Look no further than the vast number of illegal Dark-web based cyber-criminal organizations to see how ineffective the government's efforts in this regard are (not very effective at all). In fact, when these cyber-criminals end up facing justice, it is usually based on some mistake they made with those "best practices" or through good old fashioned meat & potatoes police work

Technical exploits against proper TOR deployment (as Snowden + whistleblowers have shown us) are random and unpredictable at best. It is after all what DARPA/Navy designed it to do, and it does its job well



posted on Aug, 17 2018 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: JBurns

Im not disagreeing or discouraging people to not use such measures . i just wouldnt count solely on them on a life or death situation.

Pirating sure.

talking out ur arse online to protect you from your boss or clients , sure.

Releasing concrete proof that the clintons are criminal, not so much.




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