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Boxing gloves

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posted on Aug, 14 2018 @ 11:45 AM
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a reply to: Skorpiogurl
+ that:



Wow... okay. Clearly a lot of people just pretend to know how to box. Or watched a bunch of videos and decided they are boxers LOL!

MMA... "LOL"

Listen, I wrote self defence, not MMA, not combat sport. We punch on thin sand bags hanged from concrete walls, the sand inside the linen IS the protection. We punch on wood with our forearms.

If you need wrapped protection during sand-bagging, you´re doing something wrong to begin with.. Learn how punch correctly and over a relative short amount of time, the bones in your fist will stay where they belong during punching. Because THAT´s what wrapping is really for. It´s not for impact protection it´s to keep your bones where they belong, as long as you need it until you have hardened enough.

The real secret is technique and correct energy transfer, then relaxing. If you don´t know how to relax the outer core of your fist a split second after impact, you will be much harder on your bones and softer on your enemy. With the same force!!

If you learn the above, you can punch through grown (!) 3.5cm wood sheets in the blink of an eye without any preparation or stance. Not really punching "through", you punch into and by relaxing your fist the energy can´t reflect back and it will break at the weakest point, often even not at the place where you hit it. It just breaks apart and falls down, without flying away.

I hope I explained it so it´s understandable.




posted on Aug, 14 2018 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

Thanks!



posted on Aug, 14 2018 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: Skorpiogurl
+ that:



Wow... okay. Clearly a lot of people just pretend to know how to box. Or watched a bunch of videos and decided they are boxers LOL!

MMA... "LOL"

Listen, I wrote self defence, not MMA, not combat sport. We punch on thin sand bags hanged from concrete walls, the sand inside the linen IS the protection. We punch on wood with our forearms.

If you need wrapped protection during sand-bagging, you´re doing something wrong to begin with.. Learn how punch correctly and over a relative short amount of time, the bones in your fist will stay where they belong during punching. Because THAT´s what wrapping is really for. It´s not for impact protection it´s to keep your bones where they belong, as long as you need it until you have hardened enough.

The real secret is technique and correct energy transfer, then relaxing. If you don´t know how to relax the outer core of your fist a split second after impact, you will be much harder on your bones and softer on your enemy. With the same force!!

If you learn the above, you can punch through grown (!) 3.5cm wood sheets in the blink of an eye without any preparation or stance. Not really punching "through", you punch into and by relaxing your fist the energy can´t reflect back and it will break at the weakest point, often even not at the place where you hit it. It just breaks apart and falls down, without flying away.

I hope I explained it so it´s understandable.


Yes, perfectly understandable.

There's a difference between self defense, sport-fighting and MMA. Each with various similarities and each with a lot of differences, including fight style, stance, rhythm, focus, force and yeah... glove type. Clearly I know how to wrap and I've been practicing various MMA for over 10 years. NOW I want to box. I could write a #ing book about energy transference and there's a huge difference between punching sand bags and wood vs. a person. I've spent hours punching and kicking everything you can imagine.

So... instead of getting all scientific and trying to formulae your reply before you even finish reading my post(s), let's just drop it.

I am simply looking for recommendations on gloves. The end.



posted on Aug, 14 2018 @ 12:10 PM
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posted on Aug, 14 2018 @ 01:03 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter

Listen, I wrote self defence, not MMA, not combat sport. We punch on thin sand bags hanged from concrete walls, the sand inside the linen IS the protection. We punch on wood with our forearms.

Sounds like my school. Everything that we do is "tactical" versus "competitive," and we have some canvas bags hanging on cinder-block walls, too--one bag is labeled "soft" (that's sand) and the other is "hard" (that's pea gravel)...maybe I have those mixed up, but whatever...

We also work on the Mook Jong, me more than most in the school because I like the conditioning that it provides my forearms.


The real secret is technique and correct energy transfer, then relaxing. If you don´t know how to relax the outer core of your fist a split second after impact, you will be much harder on your bones and softer on your enemy. With the same force!!

Yep...and it also produces a "whipping" motion with your fist and arm, along with preserving energy during the totality of the fight/training. We discuss proper fist angle and bone alignment quite often, along with some about energy theories (which is taught in the Kempo classes that I don't take).

We don't focus on breaking boards or anything, because as my sifu says, "When are you going to be fighting a board?," but we do focus on technique and form and energy all of the time. Our fighting stance is also open handed and loose--like you say, if you can't tighten and relax a fist at a moment's notice on command, you're doing something wrong or are just beginning and need more practice at it.

I love talking about this stuff.



posted on Aug, 14 2018 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

Haha! "When are you going to be fighting a board?" That's funny... in one of the basic classes I teach the students use wave-masters so I try to explain combo's and form/technique in real life scenario's. I always say, the person you're fighting isn't just going to stand there so... don't be stationary! Love it!

I love popping the jab open handed, makes you feel like such a bad ass! I find that in MT I'm at my best when my entire body is tensed/flexed from head to toe. It provides me with agility and a ton of speed. The balance between speed and power is tough but when you find that sweet spot, look out!



posted on Aug, 14 2018 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey
It´s also (tri)angles adding together

fist / forearm
forearm / upper arm
upper arm / chest
...
...
but I guess you know that already




We don't focus on breaking boards or anything, because as my sifu says, "When are you going to be fighting a board?," but we do focus on technique and form and energy all of the time.

And that´s the correct way. I just used this as an example. It´s one of the best to demonstrate what I was trying to explain.



Our fighting stance is also open handed and loose--like you say, if you can't tighten and relax a fist at a moment's notice on command, you're doing something wrong or are just beginning and need more practice at it.

That´s exactly what I was talking about


I started in kickboxing, peaked into judo and since about 15 years, I do wing chun. However I noticed with students, the more they think they know about fighting, the harder they struggle discarding the old ideas.

It´s evident in this thread.
And it´s evident that the OP is full of prejudice. For example he thinks that the wooden board is some power demonstration. While it demonstrates the technique.

It´s always funny how people stumble over the same pitfalls again and again.
You know what I mean.

edit on 14-8-2018 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 07:47 AM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: SlapMonkey
It´s also (tri)angles adding together

fist / forearm
forearm / upper arm
upper arm / chest
...
...
but I guess you know that already




We don't focus on breaking boards or anything, because as my sifu says, "When are you going to be fighting a board?," but we do focus on technique and form and energy all of the time.

And that´s the correct way. I just used this as an example. It´s one of the best to demonstrate what I was trying to explain.



Our fighting stance is also open handed and loose--like you say, if you can't tighten and relax a fist at a moment's notice on command, you're doing something wrong or are just beginning and need more practice at it.

That´s exactly what I was talking about


I started in kickboxing, peaked into judo and since about 15 years, I do wing chun. However I noticed with students, the more they think they know about fighting, the harder they struggle discarding the old ideas.

It´s evident in this thread.
And it´s evident that the OP is full of prejudice. For example he thinks that the wooden board is some power demonstration. While it demonstrates the technique.

It´s always funny how people stumble over the same pitfalls again and again.
You know what I mean.


OMG really? You simply want to start an argument over glove recommendations?
I am not full of prejudice. I am not a "HE" and I where did you get the idea that I think using a wooden board is a power demonstration? Christ man, stop assuming will you? I asked for a recommendation and all you've done is try to discredit everything I've said. Thanks... really, thanks for that. Because clearly you've known me for so many years, we've sparred together, we've had several conversations about MMA, about boxing, street-fighting. Or maybe I dreamt all of that... What pitfalls are you talking about?
You've mentioned several arts, which one are you practicing now?
Come one then.. let's do this...
How many years?
What rank?
How many students?
Ever been anywhere in the world to train with any Master trainers?
What books have you read on the subject? Video's? Formal studies?
Lay it out for me so I know where I stand and where I can steer my "prejudice"
How many hours a week do you put in practicing your skill? how many hours a day?
How many fights have you had? What was your ranking? Any KO's?
Let's hear it.....



posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 10:44 AM
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originally posted by: Skorpiogurl
a reply to: SlapMonkey

I always say, the person you're fighting isn't just going to stand there so... don't be stationary!

Of course--and footwork is soooo hard to teach people, too. In Krav and JKD I can handle it quite well, but get me in Eskrima, and there are times that I look like I'm trying to dance like Michael Jackson, but it's my first time ever dancing.

I'm only a certified instructor in Krav Maga, but have had to stand in for limited times in other arts--the propensity to just stand there in people, while it has it's place sometimes, is a hard thing to overcome. I'm the opposite at this point...it's hard for me to remain stationary when I'm supposed to for technique purposes. I guess that it's just something unlearned over time, which I guess is what training is all about.


I find that in MT I'm at my best when my entire body is tensed/flexed from head to toe. It provides me with agility and a ton of speed. The balance between speed and power is tough but when you find that sweet spot, look out!

Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast, as they say (and just happens to be true).

We teach not to tense one's self up, but again, we instruct for street fights--possibly life-saving defensive encounters--where outlasting one's opponent matters because there are no breaks or forced separations or any of that in such encounters. If we trained with hyper-tensed bodies, that waste of energy could be our downfall, which could end up in a loss of life. We teach and train to remain loose except for only those muscles which need to be used to get the job done. This allows better control of breathing and better stamina in a street fight.

But I've never trained for competition, which is why such ideas are relatively foreign to me--not wrong, just foreign and not specific to how and why I train. But I have very tight muscles to begin with, so even my "relaxed" is so far removed from true relaxation that it's almost comical. Decades of lifting weights and not stretching well (or at all) tend to do that. I'm currently trying to purposefully fix that situation, and it sucks.

My instructor's direct master was Richard Bustillo, one of Bruce Lee's students, who owned the IMB Academy in Los Angeles (originally opened with Dan Inosanto). We train under Lee's JKD philosophy of being the most efficient, which is why we train to be relaxed until necessary.

Unfortunately, I only got to train once with Sigung Richard before he unexpectedly died of cancer in Spring of 2017, but I'm glad that I was able to do so.

Our school just hosted Kru Walter Michalowski earlier this year--I assume that you know who he is. Unfortunately, I missed that training. I have a chance to train with Gokor Chivichyan coming up soon, too, but I'm not sure if I'll be able to make that one, either. I'll be disappointed if I miss it. I did make the training with Grand Master Anthony Kleeman at our school, though, and that was a ton of info on Eskrima that left me feeling exceptionally dumb.

A fond memory of me with Sigung Richard Bustillo--his unfortunate final seminar at our school:

His Vibram Five Finger shoes always make me chuckle...
edit on 15-8-2018 by SlapMonkey because: I screwed up the coding



posted on Aug, 15 2018 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: Skorpiogurl

OMG really? You simply want to start an argument over glove recommendations?

I wasn´t talking to you. You wrote this:



I am simply looking for recommendations on gloves. The end.

I took your word for it.

I replied to SlapMonkey and it´s not an argument, I think SlapMonkey and I agree on many levels here.
The rest of your post, I did not even read. To much vitrol. I also think you have to calm down a bit in general.
Relax.


edit on 15-8-2018 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2018 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

Oh what a wonderful photo and a wonderful memory to have! Such a great experience




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