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NASA spotted a vast, glowing 'hydrogen wall' at the edge of our solar system

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posted on Sep, 20 2018 @ 02:04 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
You're guys overblowing it. The "wall" is simply where interstellar medium composed mostly of ionised hydrogen begins. It fills our whole galaxy. In reality, it's a near-perfect vacuum, with only a few atoms per cubic centimeter. It doesn't affect how we see the rest of space in any appreciable way.


Is it even a wall? It appears to me that they are describing it as the area where the 'bow shock' of the solar system's movement through the galaxy occurs. More like the heat a capsule generates when reentering the earth's atmosphere, the heat shield on the capsule will be hotter than the top, there is more of a hydrogen build up on the leading edge of where this movement is taking place and I would assume less on the 'back edge' of the solar system.




posted on Sep, 23 2018 @ 12:07 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Is it a wall so high so long or is it also circular or rounded like a basketball surrounding our solar system?

I was unable to read any proof of it as you described having a "leading edge" and "back edge".

We have seen comets going through space towards the sun and around it, all showing what you call a leading edge and a back edge. This does prove that space is not an empty vacuum. there are molecules enough to cause pressure on the leading edge of the comet as air molecules react on a meteorite that enters our atmosphere. So we see that the space around our solar system is not with out molecules. This shows we do not have a total or complete vacuum as Physicists had claimed.

So we have Hydrogen around our solar system. What else is out there? What chemicals make up the space between the outer edges of our solar system and Earth? If it were a vacuum then a comet would have no resistance (front edge) and should not show a tail (back edge). So what is in that vacuum of space within the solar system? What molecules or what Chemicals are out there in outer space. Does the Earth have a leading edge and a back edge? If so we would feel friction and see a tail from our earth.

Ever notice that 99% of the visible craters on the moon are almost perfectly round? If it has been hit by meteorites over millions of years you think you would see a larger majority of them hitting at an angle but what we see is perfect straight down hits that form almost perfectly round craters. Why is that?


edit on 23-9-2018 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2018 @ 12:28 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
I was unable to read any proof of it as you described having a "leading edge" and "back edge".



And on the other side, in the direction of the Sun's movement through the galaxy, there's a buildup of interstellar matter, including hydrogen.



posted on Sep, 23 2018 @ 05:59 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
This shows we do not have a total or complete vacuum as Physicists had claimed.

No Physicist in the modern Era has ever claimed that space is a complete total vacuum, the amount of particles per meter cubed varies a bit, but its not ever been claimed to be a vacuum. The average density of a gas cloud for example is thought to be around 5-10 atoms per meter cube.



Does the Earth have a leading edge and a back edge? If so we would feel friction and see a tail from our earth.

From the way you describe it, you do not appear to understand the concept and are interchanging a couple of different things... comets have trails facing outward due to solar wind. They can also have gas funnelled forward at times also.

The Earth... yes, the solar winds bend the magnetic fields around the earth, so there is fields of plasma in a cushion and tail like structures.




Ever notice that 99% of the visible craters on the moon are almost perfectly round? If it has been hit by meteorites over millions of years you think you would see a larger majority of them hitting at an angle but what we see is perfect straight down hits that form almost perfectly round craters. Why is that?


If you did a little research you would see that it isn't 99%, and not only that but if you also do some research into how the impacts form the major energy release occurs as the meteor embeds, the explosive force occurs almost always outward in all directions when the velocity of the impactor has been reduced greatly. Thus you have largely circular craters.

Impactors have to hit at a very shallow angle to leave teardrops or line scars.



posted on Sep, 23 2018 @ 07:09 PM
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a reply to: ErosA433

I did not describe the earth having a leading edge or a back edge that was AugustusMasonicus I was quoting him.



posted on Sep, 23 2018 @ 07:10 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

And what is the interstellar matter building up?

Can you link me a copy of the report on the hydrogen wall, I couldn't download it.



posted on Sep, 23 2018 @ 07:55 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
And what is the interstellar matter building up?


You're the one that posted it, why you asking me?



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 11:06 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: ChesterJohn
And what is the interstellar matter building up?


You're the one that posted it, why you asking me?


No, I reread everything I wrote I think you copied that from another source. there was a cloud in front of the post you quoted under the quote you posted of mine.

I am still trying to see what is the interstellar/intergalactic matter building up on the leading edge of our solar system as it travels through the galaxy.

they don't know. From observation no other solar system shows leading or back edges with interstellar/intergalactic matter building up in front of it them.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 11:14 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

It will be hydrogen and helium mostly, and the reason why observations of other systems doesn't show it is because the measurements would be totally swamped with emission lines from the stars of those solar systems. We don't have the resolution on those instruments to image the disk of a star and adequately remove its signal in that part of the spectrum. Not only that but the terminator of this edge is not a particularly high density. We should still be talking about 10s of protons per cubic meter here. Compared to 5 or so.

Why might you think that Voyager 1 was announced to have left the solar system about 5 times? Because the termination is not exactly as abrupt as the media make out, not only that but its exact location will move a little due to the solar cycle.

en.wikipedia.org...

Wikipedia link sure, but it kind of tells you what is going on or thought to be going on.

Also yes there are other systems with optical shock fronts... mostly in nebula though.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
No, I reread everything I wrote I think you copied that from another source.


It's in your Original Post, second to last sentence of the source material you quoted.



posted on Sep, 27 2018 @ 05:02 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 08:32 PM
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a reply to: ErosA433

Thanks for that thoughtful reply. Interesting points.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 09:11 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: wildespace
You're guys overblowing it. The "wall" is simply where interstellar medium composed mostly of ionised hydrogen begins. It fills our whole galaxy. In reality, it's a near-perfect vacuum, with only a few atoms per cubic centimeter. It doesn't affect how we see the rest of space in any appreciable way.


Is it even a wall? It appears to me that they are describing it as the area where the 'bow shock' of the solar system's movement through the galaxy occurs. More like the heat a capsule generates when reentering the earth's atmosphere, the heat shield on the capsule will be hotter than the top, there is more of a hydrogen build up on the leading edge of where this movement is taking place and I would assume less on the 'back edge' of the solar system.



Imagine what's around our galaxy.

Or the universe itself!

I guess we all live in a bubble.

Can it be ignited?

Will we learn how to destroy whole systems someday?

WOW!

Eat yer heart out Death Star!




posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 10:53 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

As I said it is not MY words. They don't explain what it is either, they make assumptions without demonstrable facts, like Eisenstein's Theories of Relativity and special theories of Relativity, all of his postulates and imagining were not even demonstrable then or now, and those who have proved him wrong.
edit on 4-10-2018 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



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