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Bread's in Europe - why are they so much better or tastier?

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posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 11:57 AM
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I remember my first time eating normal grocery store rolls while in Europe (Vienna) and they had SO much more flavor than what we have in the states. Our entire family notices this and our Austrian friends can tell a big difference between American "bread" and that of their country. The bread/rolls were much better in every country in Europe that I tried and I've heard people in the travel industry tell me the same, how they are dissappointed with American products after being abroad.

It's been awhile since I've had them, but the difference would be similar to eating a really good artisan loaf vs Wonder Bread, but the European breads are better than the American artisan breads, at least from what I have had. I remember a couple VERY expensive restaurants in the US where the rolls were almost as good and I think they were made in house.

I'm wondering if it has something to do with the way the flour is processed or if it is the type of grain that is used. Maybe a difference between a winter wheat and normal "summer" variety. Or maybe it has to do with how it is processed, maybe it is ground on real stone in Europe vs metal in the US. I guess another option is the "specie" like the US has a Monsanto seed, now possibly a GMO, where those in the EU aren't GMO and could be VERY old seed/stock. I first had it in the 80's and noticed it then but was told that it was like this as long as my parents could remember, so it isn't a new development due to recent GMO's.

Another thing is I've heard people say that steak (beef) doesn't taste like it use to, no where near like it did, it's lost a lot of it's flavor supposedly. Some people say that South American beef has a lot more flavor than American and I think much of SA beef is grass fed vs corn fed American. It used to be that corn fed was what chef's wanted because it produced a fattier, more marbled meat, which is ideal for many steaks, but current health trends have changed things and people want "lean" for some reason (means MUCH less taste). I think something happened in the 1960-1980's with meat, maybe the hormones have changed how the flavor develops, less time for the flavor to get "there". IDK, but I'd love to taste what a "good steak" was back in the 1920's-1960's and compare it to todays!
edit on 8 11 2018 by DigginFoTroof because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 12:09 PM
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Our secret is the unicorn tears.



edit on 11-8-2018 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 12:14 PM
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First, the enriching of flours leaves a taste in our flour that is transferred into the bread. I discovered that a few years back. I now use organic white flour which is not enriched and add a tablespoon of wheat germ to enrich it when making bread.

In Europe they often age the bread like they used to here, making the dough and letting it rise in pans then putting it into fridges till baking about eight hours later. That is sort of sour doughing, the enzymes in the bread dough take time to properly digest the gluten. I have tried that once, but I have a fridge with food in it and the mixed smells get into the bread. I am thinking about getting a bread box for the cool shed to accomplish this in the winter. The worst culprits for causing smells are egg salads, fish, and Mexican, Italian, or chinese foods.

The bread comes out much better tasting when it is allowed to be in the fridge for a while before baking.

As far as the beef, if the cows are allowed to get most of their diet from properly taken care of pastures and the meat is dry aged by hanging for seven days or preferably more, the flavor is much better. I have no issue with finishing beef for a few week with grains, but more than that makes too much fat. Organic grain finishing is best, the pesticides of commercial grains actually builds up in the fats.


edit on 11-8-2018 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 12:21 PM
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Pretty subjective. If you compare Wonder Bread to other types, sure, but there's no need to do that. Europe tends to have more small bakeries compared to American super-stores that default to major brands with a lot of distribution that tend to squeeze out smaller brands. These are often filled with preservatives for a longer shelf life and, of course, they are made with huge machines devoid of human contact with "scientific" precision. But this is easy to avoid and quality stores usually have 'artisan' or local brands that are every bit as good as European breads. It will cost you more, but that's part of the deal. Our main store has an in-house bakery that makes their own stuff that is very good and always same-day fresh. If you want really good bread, find a local stand-alone bakery.

In terms of beef, corn fed means hormones, so grass fed can avoid that. But I think it is more a matter of cost. You can't find your better cuts of meat in a typical grocery store. You need a restaurant supplier to even find filet mignon, for example. The cuts in the grocery store are thin and amount to left overs. There are only a couple of places you can buy good meat in my area (If you care, Pike Street Market in Seattle and Tacoma Boys Fruit Stand.) The best filet I ever had was in a St. Paul restaurant, where they take their meat seriously. Ruth Chris steakhouse does a passable job. They key there is fast cooking at a very high temperature, but watch out. Their idea of medium rare would be called "rare" to West Coast people. You need to order "medium" to get what we would call "medium rare." Obviously YMMV depending on where you live. Personally I can't stand "marbled" beef. Crunching down on fat is not my idea of a good steak. But a filet cooked just right will melt in your mouth.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof


You're obviously buying the wrong bread.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
Pretty subjective. If you compare Wonder Bread to other types, sure, but there's no need to do that. Europe tends to have more small bakeries compared to American super-stores that default to major brands with a lot of distribution that tend to squeeze out smaller brands. These are often filled with preservatives for a longer shelf life and, of course, they are made with huge machines devoid of human contact with "scientific" precision. But this is easy to avoid and quality stores usually have 'artisan' or local brands that are every bit as good as European breads. It will cost you more, but that's part of the deal. Our main store has an in-house bakery that makes their own stuff that is very good and always same-day fresh. If you want really good bread, find a local stand-alone bakery.

In terms of beef, corn fed means hormones, so grass fed can avoid that. But I think it is more a matter of cost. You can't find your better cuts of meat in a typical grocery store. You need a restaurant supplier to even find filet mignon, for example. The cuts in the grocery store are thin and amount to left overs. There are only a couple of places you can buy good meat in my area (If you care, Pike Street Market in Seattle and Tacoma Boys Fruit Stand.) The best filet I ever had was in a St. Paul restaurant, where they take their meat seriously. Ruth Chris steakhouse does a passable job. They key there is fast cooking at a very high temperature, but watch out. Their idea of medium rare would be called "rare" to West Coast people. You need to order "medium" to get what we would call "medium rare." Obviously YMMV depending on where you live. Personally I can't stand "marbled" beef. Crunching down on fat is not my idea of a good steak. But a filet cooked just right will melt in your mouth.


We have a few good bakeries around here that make good bread, but they are double the store price and these breads cannot be left out of the fridge longer than the first day or they are moldy within the third day. They have a sign in both places to refrigerate the bread after the first day because they do not use any dough conditioners or chemistry to stop mold in them. I refrigerate my bread at the end of the day too, it has no preservatives. And of course, mice might get into it at night, once in a while we will get a mouse in the house, I think we just feed our three cats too well. One is 21 and deaf the other one is three and blind, the third is thirteen and getting fat but still does catch a mouse. The blind cat gets all excited when they are after a mouse and runs into doors, walls, boxes, and desks when he hears the mouse. He must have a pretty tough skull.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 12:52 PM
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I know what you mean. I buy a weekly french bread loaf that goes from the store into the fridge immediately. With these 90 degree days it will mold within 24 hours. I make garlic bread and once I cook it once the problem disappears. I use half then fridge the rest until I make croutons with the leftovers. Lot of work, but the family expects it now.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 01:31 PM
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I've noticed that bread from local bakeries (grocery store bakeries) mold extremely fast and my home made bread doesn't and it doesn't have any special conditioners or anything other than regular flour and normal ingredients. I've had their bread mold in 24 hours as well, it makes me wonder about how clean their store is and if the bread isn't more than a day old b/c there is no way that fresh bread molds as much as it does within 24 hours if made in a clean environment.

As far as the breads being different between the States and Europe, if you haven't had breads there, I don't think you have any idea what you are talking about. I've had expensive breads from the states and it still doesn't have the full flavor that it has in even the run of the mill, grocery store rolls we would find in Europe.

Another difference is the butter over there. It seems that most of it is very similar to the more expensive "boutique" butters in the states, it just seems creamier and more satisfying. I get very similar butter when I make my own from heavy cream, it's MUCH better than what comes in the sticks IMO.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

While in Germany, I was totally awe of the variations of their sour dough breads. Real stuff, no chemicals, no sugar.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Not in the U.K. our bread is mostly crap, overpriced doughy full of sugar and it sticks in your teeth. You have to go to a decent bakers or make it yourself.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 02:38 PM
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originally posted by: DigginFoTroof

As far as the breads being different between the States and Europe, if you haven't had breads there, I don't think you have any idea what you are talking about.


Sorry, but my comments come from having spent many, many weeks in Europe, from Germany and Belgium to Hungary and the Czech Republic. It's a gross assumption on your part to suggest people replying to you have never "had breads there." Your willingness to jump to conclusions brings the lie to your entire argument. You are apparently convinced of the righteousness of your assumptions no matter what anyone else has experienced and can bring to the table. Comparing like-to-like (not Wonder Bread to artisan breads) there is no difference. You are making stuff up. It's not worth discussing the issue with you if you can't accept differing points of view and additional evidence. You just showed a lack of credibility.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 02:47 PM
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originally posted by: DigginFoTroof
As far as the breads being different between the States and Europe, if you haven't had breads there, I don't think you have any idea what you are talking about.


I've had bread in both places, you can get just as good bread here.

You buying the wrong bread.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 03:35 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Augustus is right. You're buying your bread in the wrong place. Search a good Bakery near you. Supermarkets and grocery stores sell cheap bread.


edit on 11-8-2018 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 04:20 PM
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originally posted by: surfer_soul
a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Not in the U.K. our bread is mostly crap, overpriced doughy full of sugar and it sticks in your teeth. You have to go to a decent bakers or make it yourself.


That's the stuff made from Soya flour. Some of those breads are just so airy that it's like chewing on a sponge. Norway had some really good bread - energy-brod. That bread was about four to six times as dense as British bread. One slice was the equivalent of four British slices. Would keep you going and going, especially in those long Summer days.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 04:57 PM
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I dip my bread in the blood of my enemies.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 11:04 PM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
I dip my bread in the blood of my enemies.


That's a sure way to catch something nasty.



posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 12:25 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: skunkape23
I dip my bread in the blood of my enemies.


That's a sure way to catch something nasty.




Unless he is enemies with soup..



posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 12:27 AM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: skunkape23
I dip my bread in the blood of my enemies.


That's a sure way to catch something nasty.


Unless he is enemies with soup..



Gazpacho anyone?




posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 04:32 AM
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Packaged bread in supermarkets is sub-standard in the UK and the rest of Europe in my experience. Too many additives. You can see that by looking at the ingredients. Bread in the US that comes in a bag is not bread, at least that has been my experience too, and calling it bread is misleading in most cases.

If you want real bread then go to a baker. Better still, make it yourself. A breadmaker makes all the difference. Flour, yeast, sugar, salt and water. That'll make some bread you will enjoy.



posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 06:38 AM
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Anyway, just as a random experiment…

From Walmart, that stalwart of US retail versus a UK supermarket chain called Sainsbury.

An unpackaged white French “stick”, or baguette. From the in-store bakery.

- From Walmart - Ingredients: Enriched Wheat Flour (Wheat Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Enzymes), Water, Yeast, Salt, Gluten, Dextrose, Emulsifier: Diacetyl Tartaric Ester Acid of Mono and Diglycerides, Distilled Monoglycerides, Dough Conditioner: Enzymes, Ascorbic Acid. Contains Gluten. (Warning – contains wheat, for the thickies)

-- From Sainsbury -- INGREDIENTS: Fortified British Wheat Flour (Wheat Flour, Calcium Carbonate, Iron, Niacin, Thiamin), Water, Yeast, Salt, Palm Stearin, Flour Treatment Agent:Ascorbic Acid

Dough to make a baguette at home: Strong flour, water, baker’s yeast, salt. Noting in the UK flour has to contain calcium carbonate (chalk), iron, thiamin and niacin and these are added, if not already in the flour, as they are removed by the milling process.

Why so much crap in US bread?
edit on 12/8/2018 by paraphi because: (no reason given)




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