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There could be a glowing wall of hydrogen edge to our solar system

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posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 10:23 PM
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originally posted by: Pilgrum
a reply to: blackcrowe

The long-proposed 'heliopause' where the outside pressure is equal to that exerted by sol forming a bubble in which our solar system dwells?


Makes sense. The hydrogen would fall towards gravity and the sun pushes it out just as it's own 'mechanics' allowing it to exist.

In a weird way... it's like the solar system is IN the sun as the sun has various atmospheres, such as the earth and other planets. We're just not in the 'way too hot' range.




posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 10:27 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: StallionDuck

In order:

Yes.
Yes.
Yes.

Gravity.



Awesome! I got it right!

But.. For the questions part. Gravity, yes but that would lean towards an ever contracting and expanding universe, right? In the end, everything will be one massive black hole that reaches a point to where it can no longer hold it's contents and vomits out everything all over again.


Black Holes are my ultimate fascination! Can't sleep at night? Contemplate black holes. Works every time lol



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 10:37 PM
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a reply to: StallionDuck
Yeah. Except that, as far as can be determined, the Universe is expanding faster and faster. Not enough matter (including dark matter) for a big crunch.



posted on Aug, 11 2018 @ 11:27 PM
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a reply to: Phage

See... That right there makes it all the more confusing to me. Perhaps we're just in the expanding phase and hadn't gotten to the phase where everything starts contracting?

I know there is some question as to what causes the expansion between galaxies. It's thought to be dark energy/matter?. What about heat? Couldn't that be a factor? We look at mass and motion, and maybe it works differently in space, but mad amounts of heat from a combination of stars in galaxies seems like it would either propel a galaxy or push against other heat emitting galaxies.


Ahhh.. To know all the answers.. Unfortunately not in our lifetime, I imagine. Gives me more incentive to be frozen in a vat until they can replace all my parts with a cyber metal body



posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 02:55 AM
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a reply to: StallionDuck

380,000 years after the big bang. When the temperature dropped below 3000 k. The small universe was full of hydrogen. The hydrogen particles/atoms were pulled together by gravity. They were big blue stars and galaxies. Only after these first hydrogen stars/galaxies died and super nova'd did they make new stars with other elements more like what we recognise now.

As for cosmic inflation/expansion. Gravity holds matter together. But. Something else produces the space. We can only see 13.8 billion years back to just after the big bang. So. You should think the universe is 13.8 billion light years big. But, Inflation seems to be happening faster. And the universe is actually around 46 billion light years. BOOM. That's another sleepless night for you.


edit on 12-8-2018 by blackcrowe because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 03:19 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Yes. According to Einstein's Lambda says the universe should be flat and infinite. Although it might actually have a curviture which we can't measure. So it might curve back on itself. Or be a shape like the Taurus. Or wrap round and we keep seeing the same systems redshifted.

I have trouble contemplating the Lamda model. Flat and infinite. I accept it. Just hard to get the head around.




posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 03:22 AM
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a reply to: StallionDuck
The Big Bang is still pretty much the stuff of hypotheses, but one idea is that the vacuum's quantum fluctuations got blown up into the macro scale, so all the clumps of matter in space (what ultimately formed into stars and galaxies) are just a "translation" of the graininess of quantum vacuum.



posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 03:26 AM
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a reply to: Abednego




Amazing. Is like a planet and this rock is just another island on that bigger planet. Makes you think.


The day will come (not in our lifetimes) when. Because of cosmic inflation. No other light from stars/ galaxies etc can't be observed anymore. Anyone living on a planet will be lead to believe that they are the only thing in the observable universe.




posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 03:31 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr




Imagine it will be on a tour 1000 years from now. With little kids asking why it was so slow .


And. How they managed to do anything technological with their old fashioned idea's, ways and technology.




posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 03:36 AM
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a reply to: JRedBeard




I wonder what "wall" might be found at the edge of our local cluster, or what kind of material is being held at bay by the electromagnetic bubble of our entire galaxy.


Makes you think. If this "wall" is confirmed. Then. There might be other "walls".




posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 03:40 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake




Well if multiverse theory turns out to hold any weight its all bubbles really.


This is a bit old. Maybe you've seen it before.




edit on 12-8-2018 by blackcrowe because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 03:45 AM
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a reply to: Pilgrum




The long-proposed 'heliopause' where the outside pressure is equal to that exerted by sol forming a bubble in which our solar system dwells?


Makes sense. But. The universe doesn't always make sense.




posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 07:12 AM
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In case anyone's wondering, interstellar space is filled with this ionised hydrogen, but it's so tenuous it's practically vacuum by our standards (it's better vacuum that we can achieve in a vacuum chamber). There's only a few hydrogen atoms per cubic meter.

UV radiation from massive stars stips the electrons off those atoms, and when the electrons recombine with the nuclei again, they emit light in the red part of the spectrum. This is what give the nebulae their red glow.





I always wondered what our Solar System and its surroundings would look like from a few light years away; are we also inside a kind of nebula?



posted on Aug, 12 2018 @ 07:22 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Thanks wildspace.

Beautiful pics.




I always wondered what our Solar System and its surroundings would look like from a few light years away; are we also inside a kind of nebula?


I wonder the same too.


The "Pillars of Creation" from the Eagle Nebula. Evidence from the Spitzer Telescope suggests that the pillars may already have been destroyed by a supernova explosion, but the light showing us the destruction will not reach the Earth for another millennium.[1] A nebula (Latin for "cloud" or "fog";[2] pl. nebulae, nebulæ, or nebulas) is an interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen, helium and other ionized gases. Originally, nebula was a name for any diffuse astronomical object, including galaxies beyond the Milky Way. The Andromeda Galaxy, for instance, was once referred to as the Andromeda Nebula (and spiral galaxies in general as "spiral nebulae") before the true nature of galaxies was confirmed in the early 20th century by Vesto Slipher, Edwin Hubble and others.


From wiki.




posted on Aug, 13 2018 @ 01:29 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

EDIT:
Scratch that. I didn't see your later reply

edit on 13/8/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2018 @ 02:05 PM
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I've always found this visual analogy of the "Termination Shock" at the edge of the heliosphere interesting (the sink basin image below).

The termination shock is the shock wave that occurs where speed of the solar winds slow abruptly due to interaction with interstellar medium. At the point where this abrupt change in speed occurs, there is a shockwave.

Credit: Wikipedia and by Yanpas - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, commons.wikimedia.org...

This is further inward than the heliopause, which is the boundary where the pressure of the interstellar medium is enough (relative to the solar winds) to push back the solar winds. I think this wall of hydrogen is supposed to exist on the outside of the heliopause (maybe?).

Credit: NASA/IBEX/Adler Planetarium


edit on 13/8/2018 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2018 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Thanks Soylent Green Is People.

Nice find. And an simple explanation.




posted on Aug, 13 2018 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

That's a peach of an analogy.


I'm away to show the kids.



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