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Elon Musk Considers Taking Tesla Private - Trading Halted in Tesla Stock

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posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 02:11 PM
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I wouldn't be surprised if he's on drugs after that recent weirdness between him and that cave guy in Thailand or wherever. Or maybe he's always been mentally unstable and the cracks didn't start showing until he was in the spotlight more and more?
edit on 7-8-2018 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 02:21 PM
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Tesla Motors just secured 2 billion in funds from the Saudi's. Certainly will help the situation. Would make sense to privatize at this point. No more quarterly reports except to your private investors.

This alone could help right the boat as it would allow the company along with the fresh capital outside the company to reach those long term goals. They need to improve production capabilities as well as better support as in spare parts.

www.cnbc.com...
edit on 8/7/2018 by DJMSN because: Addition



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 02:34 PM
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Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund has acquired a significant position in Tesla shares, according to the Financial Times.


Didn't think much of Tesla before.

Sure the eff don't now.

Saudis!

BlaH.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 03:02 PM
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“Tesla, without any doubt, is on the verge of bankruptcy,” John Thompson, chief investment officer of Vilas Capital Management, wrote in a note to investors....Even as Tesla investors approved the largest compensation plan ever for CEO Elon Musk on Wednesday, the company has incurred nearly $5 BILLION in operating losses for shareholders.”

www.google.com...

Ouch


edit on 7-8-2018 by avgguy because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-8-2018 by avgguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 03:20 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: Edumakated

And just where would that premium come from for a company asking their suppliers to give $$ back?



The new shareholders taking the company private. They have to buyout all the existing shares. To do so, they offer a premium over existing shares. Being private does not mean you don't have shareholders. It just means the public can't buy shares of the company.

For example, if Tesla is currently trading at say $250/share, the new shareholders will offer $300/share to buy out everyone. The money comes from new debt or cash from the new shareholders taking the company private.


That's what happened with me and PETCO. I bought ? shares and held them for a year or so when the price was down the directors decided to sell all shares at a set price and although I did make a small profit on the takeover the stock price continued to climb after the buyout and the buyers made a killing on it. I don't trade at PETCO because of that screwing.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 03:24 PM
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originally posted by: FamCore
To be perfectly honest, I knew companies could go public, and could go bankrupt, but I didn't know a publicly-traded company could also go public (if the circumstances permitted). Now I realize how naive I was to never realize this.


Michael Dell rebought the shares of his company and made it mostly private again back in the early 00's after selling in the 90's.

It happens from time to time.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 03:25 PM
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originally posted by: bananashooter
I live near Silicon Valley and I see 100’s of Tesla’s, all I think is what’s going to happen to all of them when Tesla goes tits up. They probably will all be deactivated and “brick” and become worthless.


Nothing would happen to them most likely. Tesla would make a large stockpile of replacement parts, and then mechanics for electric vehicles would be able to support them for the next decade+



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 03:27 PM
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originally posted by: amazing

originally posted by: bananashooter
I live near Silicon Valley and I see 100’s of Tesla’s, all I think is what’s going to happen to all of them when Tesla goes tits up. They probably will all be deactivated and “brick” and become worthless.


Oh Tesla isn't going anywhere. Too successful. Save this post for a year or two from now and you'll see what I mean.


I absolutely agree. There is a conspiracy here, and it will come out.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: Edumakated

But Tesla isn't Apple.

TSLA is trading at near $400 a share(over priced) for a company that has a -$1.9 billion dollar net revenue.

If I was a private equity firm?

I'd stay FAR away from Tesla.


Apple never made good products, they just happened to have a CEO that was fantastic at marketing and probably the best UI/UX designer in history.

Tesla is making a very good product, and they've got a smart CEO in charge (though his public image is deteriorating). They have a reasonable chance of success.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: CharlesT

originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: Edumakated

And just where would that premium come from for a company asking their suppliers to give $$ back?



The new shareholders taking the company private. They have to buyout all the existing shares. To do so, they offer a premium over existing shares. Being private does not mean you don't have shareholders. It just means the public can't buy shares of the company.

For example, if Tesla is currently trading at say $250/share, the new shareholders will offer $300/share to buy out everyone. The money comes from new debt or cash from the new shareholders taking the company private.


That's what happened with me and PETCO. I bought ? shares and held them for a year or so when the price was down the directors decided to sell all shares at a set price and although I did make a small profit on the takeover the stock price continued to climb after the buyout and the buyers made a killing on it. I don't trade at PETCO because of that screwing.


Petco isn't public now. They got bought out by a private equity firm. So you made a profit on your shares in they buyout to take them private. The PE firm took over the company and still retains control.

The new shareholders will make their money back if the company is sold again or they choose to go public again. PE firms tend to look long term. They usually target companies they feel are undervalued, come in and make improvements to increase value, and then either sell or take the company public again to cash out.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: CharlesT

originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: Edumakated

And just where would that premium come from for a company asking their suppliers to give $$ back?



The new shareholders taking the company private. They have to buyout all the existing shares. To do so, they offer a premium over existing shares. Being private does not mean you don't have shareholders. It just means the public can't buy shares of the company.

For example, if Tesla is currently trading at say $250/share, the new shareholders will offer $300/share to buy out everyone. The money comes from new debt or cash from the new shareholders taking the company private.


That's what happened with me and PETCO. I bought ? shares and held them for a year or so when the price was down the directors decided to sell all shares at a set price and although I did make a small profit on the takeover the stock price continued to climb after the buyout and the buyers made a killing on it. I don't trade at PETCO because of that screwing.


Petco isn't public now. They got bought out by a private equity firm. So you made a profit on your shares in they buyout to take them private. The PE firm took over the company and still retains control.

The new shareholders will make their money back if the company is sold again or they choose to go public again. PE firms tend to look long term. They usually target companies they feel are undervalued, come in and make improvements to increase value, and then either sell or take the company public again to cash out.


That was 15 years ago.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 03:43 PM
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originally posted by: CharlesT

originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: CharlesT

originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: Edumakated

And just where would that premium come from for a company asking their suppliers to give $$ back?



The new shareholders taking the company private. They have to buyout all the existing shares. To do so, they offer a premium over existing shares. Being private does not mean you don't have shareholders. It just means the public can't buy shares of the company.

For example, if Tesla is currently trading at say $250/share, the new shareholders will offer $300/share to buy out everyone. The money comes from new debt or cash from the new shareholders taking the company private.


That's what happened with me and PETCO. I bought ? shares and held them for a year or so when the price was down the directors decided to sell all shares at a set price and although I did make a small profit on the takeover the stock price continued to climb after the buyout and the buyers made a killing on it. I don't trade at PETCO because of that screwing.


Petco isn't public now. They got bought out by a private equity firm. So you made a profit on your shares in they buyout to take them private. The PE firm took over the company and still retains control.

The new shareholders will make their money back if the company is sold again or they choose to go public again. PE firms tend to look long term. They usually target companies they feel are undervalued, come in and make improvements to increase value, and then either sell or take the company public again to cash out.


That was 15 years ago.


Looks like they got bought in 2000 by Leonard Green Partners and then sold again in 2015 to CVC Capital in 2015.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 04:17 PM
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originally posted by: BrianFlanders

originally posted by: bananashooter
I live near Silicon Valley and I see 100’s of Tesla’s, all I think is what’s going to happen to all of them when Tesla goes tits up. They probably will all be deactivated and “brick” and become worthless.


That's why I wouldn't buy any of these new cars that have everything tied into that "infotainment" garbage. People are used to buying cars and keeping them 15-20 years. If your climate control is tied into a touchscreen, good luck replacing that in ten years when it craps out and they don't make them anymore. Especially since they're all just different enough to where you'd have to buy exactly the right one for your vehicle.


Not true. The average age of a car in the US is 11 years, the average length of ownership in the US is 7 years, and the average length of ownership of a new car is 4 years.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: bananashooter
I live near Silicon Valley and I see 100’s of Tesla’s, all I think is what’s going to happen to all of them when Tesla goes tits up. They probably will all be deactivated and “brick” and become worthless.

That happened to products sold by the X10 Wireless Technology Company a few years ago. As soon as they went bankrupt, a lot of their products stopped working because the licensing server went offline.

-dex



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 04:42 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: BrianFlanders

originally posted by: bananashooter
I live near Silicon Valley and I see 100’s of Tesla’s, all I think is what’s going to happen to all of them when Tesla goes tits up. They probably will all be deactivated and “brick” and become worthless.


That's why I wouldn't buy any of these new cars that have everything tied into that "infotainment" garbage. People are used to buying cars and keeping them 15-20 years. If your climate control is tied into a touchscreen, good luck replacing that in ten years when it craps out and they don't make them anymore. Especially since they're all just different enough to where you'd have to buy exactly the right one for your vehicle.


Not true. The average age of a car in the US is 11 years, the average length of ownership in the US is 7 years, and the average length of ownership of a new car is 4 years.


Yeah? Well, both of my cars are 20 years old and if I want to turn on the air conditioner, I just turn the switch and it works. If either one of them had this touchscreen garbage when I bought them they would have probably been all but useless long ago.

We haven't had a car payment since 2005 or so. That buys a lot of groceries and so forth.


edit on 7-8-2018 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-8-2018 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: Jonjonj

originally posted by: amazing

originally posted by: bananashooter
I live near Silicon Valley and I see 100’s of Tesla’s, all I think is what’s going to happen to all of them when Tesla goes tits up. They probably will all be deactivated and “brick” and become worthless.


Oh Tesla isn't going anywhere. Too successful. Save this post for a year or two from now and you'll see what I mean.


I absolutely agree. There is a conspiracy here, and it will come out.


Maybe less than a conspiracy...human nature. We tend to make fun of new things and then hate them before telling everyone we knew they were great all along. Elon is successful, innovative and disrupting multiple industries. He'll go down in history as a game changer but in multiple industries. But first, the sheep must hate him.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: Scrutinizing




if they can't work out the flammable cars thing.


I am not sure if non flammable batteries exist for the masses.

I think prolly near the same % of gas guzzlers flame from time to time.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 05:11 PM
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a reply to: BrianFlanders

Yes, but I was challenging your notion that people are used to buying older cars. They are not. And when people do buy older cars those cars aren't really that old.

Think about this. By 2021, something like 85% of cars on the road are going to be new enough that they have backup cameras and blindspot detectors.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: FamCore




To be perfectly honest, I knew companies could go public, and could go bankrupt, but I didn't know a publicly-traded company could also go public (if the circumstances permitted). Now I realize how naive I was to never realize this.


You mean go private, referring to this you said above

"but I didn't know a publicly-traded company could also go public"



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 05:35 PM
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originally posted by: neo96
Tesla stock jumping makes no sense.

If it does go private sharelholders are sol.



It makes sense because stock traders know that if it goes private then the company(s) that have an interest in taking it private will offer a premium for the stocks. So if you buy now before it goes private then you stand a chance at making a substantial profit.




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