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Present VS past CO-2/Temp levels more to it than just numbers

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posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: Masterjaden

Let's not discuss the unprecedented heatwave that is plaguing Europe with temperatures reaching north of 40° Celsius. Let's ignore that all temperature records are being beaten when we're on a solar minimum. Let's ignore that countries like Ireland, which usually gets a couple of weeks of summer, actually got more than 2 weeks of summer. Or that countries like Sweden got to 30° Celsius.




posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 07:33 PM
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originally posted by: JameSimon
a reply to: Masterjaden

Let's not discuss the unprecedented heatwave that is plaguing Europe with temperatures reaching north of 40° Celsius. Let's ignore that all temperature records are being beaten when we're on a solar minimum. Let's ignore that countries like Ireland, which usually gets a couple of weeks of summer, actually got more than 2 weeks of summer. Or that countries like Sweden got to 30° Celsius.


Dont worry! We only need a 60 mile wide meteor impact to drop the temperature again.

dryas



posted on Aug, 8 2018 @ 01:54 AM
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a reply to: drewlander

When can we have that? It's too warm.



posted on Aug, 8 2018 @ 12:55 PM
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originally posted by: [post=23654334]JameSimon
Let's not discuss the unprecedented heatwave that is plaguing Europe with temperatures reaching north of 40° Celsius.

Europe's worst heatwave was 2003. prior to that it was in 1757 where it was the hottest it had been in 5 centuries, followed closely by the one in 1540. This one is not even in the ballpark of "unprecedented".


originally posted by: [post=23654334]JameSimon
Let's ignore that all temperature records are being beaten when we're on a solar minimum.

We aren't at solar minimum, in fact NASA is predicting solar minimum will not occur until at least 2020.
science.nasa.gov...


originally posted by: [post=23654334]JameSimon
Let's ignore that countries like Ireland, which usually gets a couple of weeks of summer, actually got more than 2 weeks of summer. Or that countries like Sweden got to 30° Celsius.

Ireland's summer lasts 4 months, every single year.

Sweden's temperature records range up to 38 degrees Celsius, and of the 20 hottest temperatures ever recorded in Sweden, only one of them occurred after 1975 and even that was back in the 90's.



posted on Aug, 20 2018 @ 09:46 AM
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originally posted by: atsgrounded
Just a small sample of this fact based look at CO2 levels and how ice cores are used to show historic levels of the gas and how they are more than likely not accurate. Pressures that old ice samples are exposed to can dissolve CO2 into surrounding ice, making the ice cores not reliable.

Quote regarding the ice-core data:



One of these reasons is that the ice-core does not fulfill the closed-system criteria and various fractionation processes can distort the original gases encased within the ice. Some of these processes include gravitational compression which forces CO2 out of the ice over millennia and also the formation of clathrates which can cause the ice to crack as it’s decompressed resulting in the contamination of the original gas concentrations within the ice. Additionally, different extraction methods yield different results. The wet-extraction method depicts CO2 as high as 900ppmv, whereas the dry-extraction method shows much lower concentrations (Jaworowski 1992: A Critical Review). Also measurements of CO2 within the surface-snow, in Antarctica, have been shown to contain a “50% lower CO2 content than the ambient atmosphere” (Jaworowski 1992: A Critical Review). Stomata proxy and chemical CO2 measurements both show more variability than the ice-core with atmospheric CO2 as high as 459ppmv (Wagner et al 2002, Kurschner et al 1997 and Royer ey al 2001).



posted on Aug, 22 2018 @ 09:22 PM
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originally posted by: bronco73

originally posted by: [post=23654334]JameSimon
Let's not discuss the unprecedented heatwave that is plaguing Europe with temperatures reaching north of 40° Celsius.

Europe's worst heatwave was 2003. prior to that it was in 1757 where it was the hottest it had been in 5 centuries, followed closely by the one in 1540. This one is not even in the ballpark of "unprecedented".


originally posted by: [post=23654334]JameSimon
Let's ignore that all temperature records are being beaten when we're on a solar minimum.

We aren't at solar minimum, in fact NASA is predicting solar minimum will not occur until at least 2020.
science.nasa.gov...


originally posted by: [post=23654334]JameSimon
Let's ignore that countries like Ireland, which usually gets a couple of weeks of summer, actually got more than 2 weeks of summer. Or that countries like Sweden got to 30° Celsius.

Ireland's summer lasts 4 months, every single year.

Sweden's temperature records range up to 38 degrees Celsius, and of the 20 hottest temperatures ever recorded in Sweden, only one of them occurred after 1975 and even that was back in the 90's.


Ireland's summer lasts 4 months? You and I must have a very different definition of proper summer. No. Ireland's summer, with consistent temperatures over 20 degrees Celsius, lasts a couple of weeks per year, or a month. We had 3 months this year and severe drought. We also had consecutive 30 degree days this year. Multiple temperature records were beaten in Portugal and Spain. A single day with a peak temperature above the average doesn't mean the average hasn't increased.

Also, solar activity has been decreasing since 2014: science.nasa.gov...
edit on 22-8-2018 by JameSimon because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2018 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: atsgrounded

See ny latest thread to understand the climate agenda



posted on Aug, 23 2018 @ 09:49 PM
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originally posted by: JameSimon

originally posted by: bronco73

originally posted by: [post=23654334]JameSimon
Let's not discuss the unprecedented heatwave that is plaguing Europe with temperatures reaching north of 40° Celsius.

Europe's worst heatwave was 2003. prior to that it was in 1757 where it was the hottest it had been in 5 centuries, followed closely by the one in 1540. This one is not even in the ballpark of "unprecedented".


originally posted by: [post=23654334]JameSimon
Let's ignore that all temperature records are being beaten when we're on a solar minimum.

We aren't at solar minimum, in fact NASA is predicting solar minimum will not occur until at least 2020.
science.nasa.gov...


originally posted by: [post=23654334]JameSimon
Let's ignore that countries like Ireland, which usually gets a couple of weeks of summer, actually got more than 2 weeks of summer. Or that countries like Sweden got to 30° Celsius.

Ireland's summer lasts 4 months, every single year.

Sweden's temperature records range up to 38 degrees Celsius, and of the 20 hottest temperatures ever recorded in Sweden, only one of them occurred after 1975 and even that was back in the 90's.


Ireland's summer lasts 4 months? You and I must have a very different definition of proper summer. No. Ireland's summer, with consistent temperatures over 20 degrees Celsius, lasts a couple of weeks per year, or a month. We had 3 months this year and severe drought. We also had consecutive 30 degree days this year. Multiple temperature records were beaten in Portugal and Spain. A single day with a peak temperature above the average doesn't mean the average hasn't increased.

Also, solar activity has been decreasing since 2014: science.nasa.gov...


Well why don't we just ask Ireland about their summer... who better to "define" their summer than the people who actually live there?
www.ireland.com...
"Ireland's climate is influenced most by the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, it doesn’t have the extreme temperatures that other countries at similar latitude would have. The average temperature is a mild 50°F. A major warm ocean current called the North Atlantic Drift keeps sea temperatures mild too. Hills and mountains, mainly around the coast, shelter the rest of the island from strong winds coming off the ocean. So while the weather can be changeable – it's rarely extreme. The seasons: spring and summer In spring (February to April), the average highest temperatures range from 46 to 54°F, with April considered particularly pleasant. In summer (May to July), the averages for highest temperatures are between 64 and 68°F. The warmest months, July and August, get about 18 hours of daylight and it gets dark only after 11pm. Hence the well-worn phrase in Ireland; "sure there's a grand stretch in the evenings"."

I made zero claims as to the solar activity either increasing or decreasing, and I do know full well that it is decreasing. I simply pointed out where you were incorrect (as was your entire post) when you claimed we are at solar minimum. NASA, who knows a tad more about it than either you or I, claims it will not be at least until after 2020 when solar minimum arrives.



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