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A star has just whizzed by our galaxy's Supermassive Black Hole, proving Einstein's Relativity

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posted on Jul, 30 2018 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: Alien Abduct

originally posted by: WarPig1939
Could anyone imagine the time displacement effect being next to a black hole? The amount of time that would pass in a day would be immense. A estimated 7-8 years per hour and in 24 hours = 168 years give or take. If anyone would want to do some real time travel, sit on the edge of an black hole and centuries will go by in a few weeks time.


Does anyone know if it’s possible to orbit a black hole close enough to experience any significant time dilation affects without being torn to bits?


Yes. The larger a black hole is, the weaker are the tidal forces. You should be able to safely reach the event horizon of our black hole for example, assuming radiation and the accretion disk are not a problem.
edit on 30-7-2018 by moebius because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 30 2018 @ 10:02 AM
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originally posted by: moebius

originally posted by: Alien Abduct

originally posted by: WarPig1939
Could anyone imagine the time displacement effect being next to a black hole? The amount of time that would pass in a day would be immense. A estimated 7-8 years per hour and in 24 hours = 168 years give or take. If anyone would want to do some real time travel, sit on the edge of an black hole and centuries will go by in a few weeks time.


Does anyone know if it’s possible to orbit a black hole close enough to experience any significant time dilation affects without being torn to bits?

Yes. The larger a black hole is, the weaker are the tidal forces. You should be able to safely reach the event horizon of our black hole for example, assuming radiation and the accretion disk are not a problem.

That, and also it's simply a matter of time. The longer you spend near a black hole (at a safe distance), the more the effect of time dilation will be.

It would be cool to get some physics buffs on this case and calculate just by how much that star's time slowed down.
edit on 30-7-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2018 @ 01:37 PM
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Phil Plait, as expected, has a nice writeup on the event: www.syfy.com...

But what's more interesting is his earlier article where he outlines the predictions made ahead of that star's close approach: www.syfy.com...

He outlines how the gravitational redshift of the star was predicted to equate to a velocity redshift of additional 200 km/s, which is exactly what was observed.

Another cool prediction (and something I'd never heard of before) is "relativistic precession" of the star's orbit. With every passage so close to the black hole, the long axis of the star's orbit will rotate slightly. This effect should be detectable in further observations by around 2020.

Awesome science all around!



posted on Jul, 30 2018 @ 01:56 PM
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a reply to: moebius

a reply to: wildespace

Thanks for putting it into terms I can understand and visualize, to think that this man who said such quotes actually had a brain which could understand all this and still be able to relate to the common man, big thanks to moebius and wildespace for showing his work lives on


he would be proud of the knowledge shared here









edit on 30-7-2018 by UpIsNowDown because: link



posted on Jul, 30 2018 @ 04:21 PM
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originally posted by: moebius

originally posted by: Alien Abduct

originally posted by: WarPig1939
Could anyone imagine the time displacement effect being next to a black hole? The amount of time that would pass in a day would be immense. A estimated 7-8 years per hour and in 24 hours = 168 years give or take. If anyone would want to do some real time travel, sit on the edge of an black hole and centuries will go by in a few weeks time.


Does anyone know if it’s possible to orbit a black hole close enough to experience any significant time dilation affects without being torn to bits?


Yes. The larger a black hole is, the weaker are the tidal forces. You should be able to safely reach the event horizon of our black hole for example, assuming radiation and the accretion disk are not a problem.


What would my orbit speed have to be in order not to fall in, assuming the calculations of the black hole being 93 million miles in diameter is correct?

Also what about the affects of centrifugal force?



posted on Jul, 30 2018 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

so time travel to the future is possible for the observer who sits close enough to a black hoke that minutes to them is actually years for those in normal space on earth . If that person was then able to leave the time dilation near the black hole and return they'd be in the future !

it's time travel but just not instantenous !
and would you really want to assuming youd survive !
everyone you knew would be gone



posted on Jul, 30 2018 @ 10:30 PM
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originally posted by: sapien82
a reply to: wildespace

so time travel to the future is possible for the observer who sits close enough to a black hoke that minutes to them is actually years for those in normal space on earth . If that person was then able to leave the time dilation near the black hole and return they'd be in the future !

it's time travel but just not instantenous !
and would you really want to assuming youd survive !
everyone you knew would be gone


Yes, and if you watched the movie Interstellar, that's exactly what happened when a team spent just a short time on a planetoid near a black hole. When they got back to their mothership, the guy who stayed behind aged 40 years.

Interstellar is a kind of sci-fi movie that based on some real physics and science; they even had a theoretical physicist as a consultant. Their depiction of a black hole is the most realistic one in movies ever.



posted on Jul, 30 2018 @ 10:38 PM
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originally posted by: Alien Abduct

originally posted by: moebius

originally posted by: Alien Abduct

originally posted by: WarPig1939
Could anyone imagine the time displacement effect being next to a black hole? The amount of time that would pass in a day would be immense. A estimated 7-8 years per hour and in 24 hours = 168 years give or take. If anyone would want to do some real time travel, sit on the edge of an black hole and centuries will go by in a few weeks time.


Does anyone know if it’s possible to orbit a black hole close enough to experience any significant time dilation affects without being torn to bits?


Yes. The larger a black hole is, the weaker are the tidal forces. You should be able to safely reach the event horizon of our black hole for example, assuming radiation and the accretion disk are not a problem.


What would my orbit speed have to be in order not to fall in, assuming the calculations of the black hole being 93 million miles in diameter is correct?

Also what about the affects of centrifugal force?

You can't be too near the event horizon if you want to orbit a black hole. www.quora.com...
At light speed you can orbit black hole at 1.5 its radius. Of course, you can’t go that fast, but light can. It’s called photon sphere. Closer than 1.5 R even light is not fast enough to orbit. A massive body can orbit black hole at 3x radius, not closer. And then the farther you get from black hole, the less speed you need to orbit it.

Centrifugal force doesn't enter into this, since all you're experiencing is free fall.
edit on 30-7-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2018 @ 11:10 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

Great Thread OP! S&F!



posted on Aug, 9 2018 @ 10:10 PM
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a reply to: howtonhawky

No no I don't believe that theory one bit but a few truths in it and some stories. I am more along the lines of the second layer of water found in the bore hole as well as the brine layer deep in the ocean.



posted on Aug, 21 2018 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: wylekat

Yes I am studying all three currently. Some of the things I am finding and testing are blowing me away.

All three can create life and kill it. Also the fact that we shock our heart to bring it back to life has always been a fascination to me. Why is there little electricity info and bioelectricty info on the human body. I am not buying into it yet but body tuning and what the main lady is finding has overly intrigued me due to my own theory or prediction was that the humans skin is a insulator like electrical wires but I theorized that we had a second layer or a static insulator that has a different task as it lets small amounts of electricity in and out....ohh and the bodies PH level! The connections are crazy and I tested putting magnets together and changing their magnetic field. What I found was at certain magnetic field setups would make the magnet change in strength of reacting with the human body or skin. On one setup made it very hard to pick up with two fingers because one side repelled and the other attracted.

I am ordering ferofluid and using a lava lamp with something to spin or churn the water or lava lamp and run some tests. Should be fun.

Sry I got excited and ranty lol




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