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Hard Go Today

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posted on Jul, 21 2018 @ 07:36 PM
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So I told my hay guy I'd be over there to pick up hay at about 0830L. My dirt work guy had me blocked in, I couldn't get my 35' trailer out. I finally got it out about an hour later after I found my Caterpillar keys and managed to move his scraper/pan.

My hay guy only had bales of hay larger than I wanted (3x4's). Told him I'd take (10) bales and then did the math. NOPE! Can only take (8). So I'm loaded up at 16,000lbs, and heavy. Okay, we'll deal with it, not too far to go.

I get home and there's more S# in my way, no flat spot to unload (DANGER!!). Wife does a fantastic job unloading...and stacking...the hay. Okay we're good. Right?

Needed to get the ATV in for its first service appointment since we bought it in '06. Okay, it's a little overdue, but it runs GREAT!

Unhook the gooseneck trailer and back up in the driveway to load the ATV. Driveway is steep so loading is easier, BUT right before I load it the wife says..."Do you wanna load it frontwards, or backwards?"

Hmmmmmmmm......good question!!!! Frontwards is skerry, but backwards on the off-load is going to be even more skeery!

We load it frontwards, thinking the dealership has a lift to take it off. (the dealership does NOT have a lift, and they really don't care HOW you unload your crap, or if you die doing it!)

Okay, I'll get the damn thing unloaded. I did.

Rewind back to this morning...I told the seller I wanted (12) bales on the trailer...then I did the math. I'd have been at 16,800 (traler is 15,680 (max) and the trailer weighs 5,100 lbs. I'd have been (3) tons over weight.

No wait...(8) bales only. Now I'm 10,800, plus the trailer. About 16,000 lbs.

I only wish people understood how hard this is.




posted on Jul, 21 2018 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Folks who live a city apartment or condo have no clue. Of course, IMHO, they are pretty useless when it comes to homestead labor. Or maybe they are just smarter?



posted on Jul, 21 2018 @ 09:40 PM
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originally posted by: ABNARTY
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Folks who live a city apartment or condo have no clue. Of course, IMHO, they are pretty useless when it comes to homestead labor. Or maybe they are just smarter?


We'll see how smarter they are when the power goes off.



Edited At Add... it is hard being self-sufficient and not have to lean on state and federal governments to get by. That being said, it has always put a smile on my face when I do it.

Sorry for your day, winter is coming and it's nice to work when the sun is up and it's not so cold!!!

I took the road of not having livestock because I figure if I lose everything and am destitute, at least the property is paid for, the taxes take care of themselves with rebates and I'll never run short of meat, what with the bears and elk and deer here.

My first comment wasn't so much about some catastrophic loss of the power grid as much as life's circumstances and not being able to pay the electric bill.

edit on 21-7-2018 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2018 @ 09:52 PM
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originally posted by: Lumenari

originally posted by: ABNARTY
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Folks who live a city apartment or condo have no clue. Of course, IMHO, they are pretty useless when it comes to homestead labor. Or maybe they are just smarter?


We'll see how smarter they are when the power goes off.



Edited At Add... it is hard being self-sufficient and not have to lean on state and federal governments to get by. That being said, it has always put a smile on my face when I do it.

Sorry for your day, winter is coming and it's nice to work when the sun is up and it's not so cold!!!

I took the road of not having livestock because I figure if I lose everything and am destitute, at least the property is paid for, the taxes take care of themselves with rebates and I'll never run short of meat, what with the bears and elk and deer here.

My first comment wasn't so much about some catastrophic loss of the power grid as much as life's circumstances and not being able to pay the electric bill.


Exactly. Any country wants to take us down? Just knock out our electricity for a few weeks. City folk will be ready to give their firstborn to get power back.

Edit to add: I replied to your post BEFORE you added your edit. 😊. You weren't referring to a grid knock out, but I am 😊
edit on 21-7-2018 by KansasGirl because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2018 @ 10:45 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Hard as surveying was?????




posted on Jul, 21 2018 @ 11:21 PM
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Sounds like a normal Saturday for someone who has a farm like you and works on top of that. Most people nowadays with regular jobs have no clue how some people actually work for a living



posted on Jul, 22 2018 @ 12:24 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
Oh wow. Your having this much trouble loading and unloading hay? Well look on the bright side, whats the worst that could happen? A big old heavy hay bail falls on you and you get a neck cramp for a day or two, it would almost be like getting smashed by the worlds biggest pillow. Worse things have a happened.



posted on Jul, 22 2018 @ 04:15 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Genuinely not downplaying the difficulty of your work, farming, especially live stock farming is hard work.

Anyone working with logistics in any form should have a basic understanding of loading, securing load appropriately and ensuring whatever device or vehicle you're using isn't overladen.

Health and safety stuff. Basic training really. I've seen the consequences of idiots not doing the job properly, no sympathy for those who mess up things that endanger others. Usually have choice words for them too.

As said I've seen the consequences of others idiocy.

Credits for not cutting corners when corners shouldn't be cut though
IMHO the dealership should be a little more accommodating too, lift or not. Easing other's loads, whether it's technically your job or not is the decent thing to do ya know?

Meh, work ethic. Always makes me smile when a shopkeeper or the likes helps unload/load, they don't have to.



posted on Jul, 22 2018 @ 05:33 AM
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originally posted by: galadofwarthethird
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
Oh wow. Your having this much trouble loading and unloading hay? Well look on the bright side, whats the worst that could happen? A big old heavy hay bail falls on you and you get a neck cramp for a day or two, it would almost be like getting smashed by the worlds biggest pillow. Worse things have a happened.


Ummm...these "bales" I'm talking about are far from "the worlds biggest pillow"! They're 3 feet high x 4.5 feet wide x 8 feet long and weigh 1,400 lbs each. One of these things falls on you and you're getting a little more than a 'neck cramp'! They're bailed up tight (i.e. solid) too so there's nothing 'pillow-ey' about them. In fact, they're bailed up so tight they're actually waterproof without being covered. If you cut the bailing twine on one and try to jab a pitchfork in one the pitchfork won't even penetrate the bale, you have to pry the flake off.

Unloading top bales off the trailer will lift the rear tires of the tractor off the ground if you stop or hit the brakes too hard. If you get on any kind of a slope with a bale up high they will easily flip the tractor over.

A couple years ago we had a 3x3 bale just roll over (not fall) on one of our dogs and it just about killed her. That little incident cost about $3,500 in vet bills!



posted on Jul, 22 2018 @ 05:37 AM
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a reply to: RAY1990




... Always makes me smile when a shopkeeper or the likes helps unload/load, they don't have to.


One of the things I always love about the feed stores. They will always load you, it's just like a 'given'.



posted on Jul, 22 2018 @ 09:02 AM
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originally posted by: galadofwarthethird
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
Oh wow. Your having this much trouble loading and unloading hay? Well look on the bright side, whats the worst that could happen? A big old heavy hay bail falls on you and you get a neck cramp for a day or two, it would almost be like getting smashed by the worlds biggest pillow. Worse things have a happened.


I hope you're joking and not serious.

Hay bales have some serious heft on them. Sure hay's all light and fluffy ... until you pack it into a compact bale of large size. I am guessing he is stalking about the big round variety. My grandpa only ever did the smaller square kind and they were heavy enough. I can't imagine how much heavier they get when you make them the big, round variety.



posted on Jul, 22 2018 @ 09:02 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Yeah, dad worked a feed store for years. Wound up with a hip replacement in his feed hauling hip. The other was and is just fine.



posted on Jul, 22 2018 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Actually these bales are rectangular, 'large squares' we call them.

They're 4 feet wide by 3 feet tall by 8 feet long, and they weigh about 1,400 lbs apiece.

And yes, small bales are no joking matter either. Bucked many a load of small bale hay in my younger years. That's a young man's chore, too old for that now. A typical bale of fresh green hay will weigh about 80+ pounds. Stack a few hundred of those in a day and you'll be plenty tired come bedtime! Plus, when you're hauling hay you get the 'pleasure' of unstacking it to load, restacking on the trailer, unstacking it off the trailer and restacking it at the destination. It's murder on your back, hands and especially your knees (from climbing up and down the stack carrying bales). Just the memory of that makes me tired! Which is why we use the big bales now and we move them with tractors. Makes feeding a lot easier. Just set a bale down by the corrals and put feed in the bunks from there until it's gone.

I remember one time up in Wyoming hauling hay (small bales). It was blazing hot. The bales were super heavy too. Got the whole truck loaded and right towards the end I was SOOOOOooooo looking forward to the ride back to town just to rest. Got everything strapped down and took off. Relief!! Turned the corner out of the ranch onto the highway and the guy driving the truck cut the corner too close and drove one of the trailer tires down through the borrow ditch. The load shifted right, and right about the same time the trailer came up out of the ditch which caused the load to violently shift left, breaking two of the straps. Dumped about 85% of the load right off the trailer onto the highway!! My rest break just turned into a nightmare!

Then we had to hump it twice as hard to clear the highway before the sheriff showed up and wrote us up. I think that's about the hardest I ever worked in my life that day. It's a wonder no one died of a heart attack or heat stroke that day.



posted on Jul, 22 2018 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

So you're finally achieving our dream to start a business... We'll have hay rides, jumping from a barn loft into a pile of hay, finding a needle in a haystack, rolling around in the hay with a dates (no funny business just some smoochin')...

or...i guess you could just, like, feed it to the animals and do farm stuff with it, like covering the ground with hay.

I always enjoy reading your farm/ranch/tractor/animal stories👍🏼Thanks for sharing. It does sound hard, even in our modern age!



posted on Jul, 22 2018 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Dad used to help grandpa at hay baling time, and he used to hate it when they'd get a snake baled up. He'd look down and see a pissed off snake wrapped around his boot.



posted on Jul, 22 2018 @ 12:21 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

And they sure DO get baled up in the hay too! I stuck about 12 bales of alfalfa in the barn once. When I got done I was just sitting there on one of the bales and watched as one very pissed off rattler came wriggling out right by my leg, and he was not one bit happy at all! I jumped up on the bale like a little girl (not that it would have helped). My pistol was in the truck about 100' away and I didn't have anything else. I spotted a tree trimming pole I could reach and grabbed it. I sort of scooped him up on it and flung him out of the barn door. He struck at that pole about 3 times. Jumped down and ran over and grabbed a shovel and gave him a little headache before dividing him into two snakes.

That was one MAD rattlesnake! I think it took him a full 30 minutes to stop wriggling around. Picked the body up to cut the rattle off and it still wrapped around my arm. Another rattle for the collection.



posted on Jul, 27 2018 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
That's pretty heavy but not that heavy, unless your trying to lift them by hand. But even with all that I don't see anybody dying from that unless there old, sick, or who knows what, drooped from a height right on your head would probably do the trick.

And checking on it, seems that mostly people who get killed by bales are old people who lifted it up with there tractor then for some reason go underneath them while its in the air. But then again more people seem to die from chocking on peanuts each year then by bale.

So whatever. Just get the round ones and roll them around.

In fact why not get the round ones and let them roll, in fact you could have yourself the first annual running of the bales just line a few of them up, and let them roll. Dont be a party pooper. Be cool like these guys.




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