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Texas set to pass Iraq, Iran as world's third-largest oil producer

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posted on Jul, 19 2018 @ 07:18 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6


Texas will always be the second largest state in the Union.


Yeah, so take that, you tiny Texans !!



(post by skunkape23 removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on Jul, 19 2018 @ 07:34 PM
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a reply to: face23785

They could but it would be expensive.

There's a reason new refineries haven't been built in decades.

www.usnews.com...



posted on Jul, 19 2018 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: face23785

I think invading Iraq was more to maintain power over the pipeline that goes through it. Also there's a lot of oil. Saddam just didn't have the tech to get it. We will see what happens in a decade or so with Iraq.

Also. I work with two Iraqis they fled a few years before 9/11, and they both worked in the oil fields as welders. I should ask them about their experiences.



posted on Jul, 19 2018 @ 08:39 PM
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originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: face23785

They could but it would be expensive.

There's a reason new refineries haven't been built in decades.

www.usnews.com...


Of course they're expensive but from a business standpoint, wouldn't it be worth it if that enables you to export that type of oil to more countries?



posted on Jul, 19 2018 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: face23785

Not with today's EPA regulations.

It's cheaper to ship it offshore.



posted on Jul, 19 2018 @ 08:43 PM
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originally posted by: strongfp
a reply to: face23785

I think invading Iraq was more to maintain power over the pipeline that goes through it. Also there's a lot of oil. Saddam just didn't have the tech to get it. We will see what happens in a decade or so with Iraq.

Also. I work with two Iraqis they fled a few years before 9/11, and they both worked in the oil fields as welders. I should ask them about their experiences.


The problem with that theory is it's already been 15 years since the invasion. Wait another decade? Most of the people who were supposed to benefit from this are gonna be dead or close to it. Not a very clever scheme by this shadow cabal of oil-hungry string-pullers is it?



posted on Jul, 19 2018 @ 08:44 PM
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originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: face23785

Not with today's EPA regulations.

It's cheaper to ship it offshore.



What about having one of our oil companies build a refinery in another country that has less stringent regulations?

Lol dude if we're sitting on such a giant reserve of that kind of oil, there's got to be some way to make it marketable.



posted on Jul, 19 2018 @ 10:17 PM
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originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: face23785

They could but it would be expensive.

There's a reason new refineries haven't been built in decades.


Ahhh, the myth that refuses to die.
Here is a list of the new refineries built in the last 20 years including several in the last 7 yrs.

link from the US government to help you understand
edit on 19-7-2018 by quercusrex because: Spacing



posted on Jul, 20 2018 @ 08:30 AM
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The way a refinery works is by separating the different aspects of the oil. This is done using heat, and towers with weir plates that allow the different viscosities, thickness/compositions to separate from the starting volume. This is the simple explanation… Heavier industrial aspects settle towards the bottom of the weir plated tower, engine oil for example. The lighter aspects separate towards the top of the tower, gasoline.

The essential difference to refine the two main types is how to reduce the amount of Sulphur. Sour crude has a higher sulphur content that needs processed and removed before going to the refining tower.

Basicly sour cost more, because it requires a couple of extra steps that sweet crude does not. Also the end product is a big factor in determining which to refine, sweet crude tends to be turned into gasoline easily. Sour crude usually refined to industrial uses and diesel.



My point is, the U.S. can easily refine either. But it's much more marketable to produce gasoline from sweet, and then ship it out from U.S. ports.



posted on Jul, 20 2018 @ 08:54 AM
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originally posted by: CrawlingChaos
The way a refinery works is by separating the different aspects of the oil. This is done using heat, and towers with weir plates that allow the different viscosities, thickness/compositions to separate from the starting volume. This is the simple explanation… Heavier industrial aspects settle towards the bottom of the weir plated tower, engine oil for example. The lighter aspects separate towards the top of the tower, gasoline.

The essential difference to refine the two main types is how to reduce the amount of Sulphur. Sour crude has a higher sulphur content that needs processed and removed before going to the refining tower.

Basicly sour cost more, because it requires a couple of extra steps that sweet crude does not. Also the end product is a big factor in determining which to refine, sweet crude tends to be turned into gasoline easily. Sour crude usually refined to industrial uses and diesel.



My point is, the U.S. can easily refine either. But it's much more marketable to produce gasoline from sweet, and then ship it out from U.S. ports.


Thanks for this contribution.



posted on Jul, 23 2018 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

You did see the posts about Texas invading other states right? So I wouldn't be to sure about that. Maybe they'll take New Mexico Arizona and Cali and make Cali respectable again.

Jaden



posted on Jul, 23 2018 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: Masterjaden

I'd like to see them as they encounter the first mountains of New Mexico. There's a reason Texas' western border ends at the Guadalupe Mountains. A few bold Texicans scaled Signal Peak enough to plant a Texan flag on it immediately before passing out from oxygen depletion, exhaustion, and altitude sickness. It is rumored as the last one peeked over the rim of Signal Peak, looking west, he saw the San Andres range and imposing Salinas peak on the horizon. With his dying breath, he shouted down, "There are bigger mountains ahead, amigos! We must press on, remember the Alamo!" As his unconscious carcass slid down the side of Signal Peak, coming to rest against a mesquite brush, each Texan looked at their boots and mumbled "I'll pass"... which, due to Texan accents sounding like someone trying to read while holding a mouthful of marbles and loose oatmeal, was taken as "El Paso," and the name stuck.
edit on 23-7-2018 by burdman30ott6 because: (no reason given)




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