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The Hunt for Earth’s Deep Hidden Oceans THINK REALLY DEEP

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posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 02:38 AM
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Some more info about the water that lays deep below our feet. There is an area that starts at approx 410 kilometers deep, called the transition zone where all the magic seems to be happening. It is said the transition zone is around a 250-kilometer deep zone (410+250 = 660 where it bottoms out) which makes up just about seven percent of the Earth's total mass and goes on to state that even at one percent of water in the zone there would be more water down there than all the water in the oceans.. Amazing !


Not actual drops of water, or even molecules of H20, but its ingredients, atoms of hydrogen and oxygen embedded in the crystal structure of the mineral itself. This hydrous mineral isn’t wet. But when it melts, out spills water. The discovery was the first direct proof that water-rich minerals exist this deep, between 410 and 660 kilometers down, in a region called the transition zone, sandwiched between the upper and lower mantles.



Since then, scientists have found more tantalizing evidence of water. In March, a team announced that they had discovered diamonds from Earth’s mantle that have actual water encased inside. Seismic data has also mapped water-friendly minerals across a large portion of Earth’s interior. Some scientists now argue that a huge reservoir of water could be lurking far beneath our feet. If we consider all of the planet’s surface water as one ocean, and there turn out to be even a few oceans underground, it would change how scientists think of Earth’s interior. But it also raises another question: Where could it have all come from?


It would seem to me with all the gas clouds detected by Hubble and other means the universe is full of water. Just looking at our own solar system and the outer planets which have been found to be made mostly of water and ice how could anyone come to a different conclusion ?

They use to say earth during formation was to close to the sun for water to stay.. So all the water was delivered by comets or asteroids after the formation.. Looks like they might have been wrong..


www.quantamagazine.org...




posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 03:11 AM
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Nicely put together thread.


It feels like we are on the brink of some startling relevations.

😎



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 03:43 AM
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Amazing... Following that line of thinking for the last 2 days.I can say something just doesn't add up with the old



... So all the water was delivered by comets or asteroids after the formation.


Hypotesis :

If science claims this they must consider that in the shear amount of chemical and nuclear processes there might be processes that generate water as a by product. However when one follows OP's trail it becomes clear that continental drift might be wrong as well. because it follows that there was less water in the past. Which in turn is suggest by some scientist (the old DDR eastgerman ones ,the one with the repulsine, food for skeptics
that the earth might slowly (very slowly increase in size (mass maybe too?)).


If that’s the case, at least some of Earth’s interior water must have always been here. Despite the heat in the early solar system, water molecules could have stuck to the dust particles that coalesced to form Earth, according to some theories.



Neutrino's and water ...


Induced fission Very much like neutrons do in nuclear reactors, neutrinos can induce fission reactions within heavy nuclei.[38] So far, this reaction has not been measured in a laboratory, but is predicted to happen within stars and supernovae. The process affects the abundance of isotopes seen in the universe.[37] Neutrino fission of deuterium nuclei has been observed in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, which uses a heavy water detector.

Wikipedia

Somehow I personally believe that neutrino's deep inside the earth can influence chemical processes inside the earth and one byproduct is water.It's true neutrino's (almost) don't interact with matter by the shear amount of neutrino's combined with the fact that's a hadron (hence Pauli exclusion principle) seems to me that they could in theory catalyse chemical reactions that might result in water being produced deep inside the earth.
But For now the only 'proof' we have is that kola station has found water at depths where it shouldn't be.



edit on 7152018 by frenchfries because: (no reason given)

edit on 7152018 by frenchfries because: (no reason given)

edit on 7152018 by frenchfries because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 04:28 AM
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Fountains of the deep, anyone?
Cool topic!



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 05:06 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Yay!

Does this mean we'll have sponge-earth theories now?

I want to be a sponge-earther...

Fascinating stuff op, S+F



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 08:59 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Well there is a theory that the moon was formed after a rogue planet the theory called thera collided with earth and the moon was spun off as an effect perhaps thera was covered in ice or had frozen water in its makeup and the impact blended the 2 planets together.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:22 PM
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There are some types of granite (igneous rock) that are actually porous to water. Friends in France have a home made from the stuff and the rock actually absorbs rainwater when it rains and slowly releases it afterwards. Keeps the air cool and damp. There's no physical change in size, but considering the size of the tectonic plates, vast amounts of water could be stored in this way.

It's known that the interaction between the Sun and Earth magnetic fields can cause the mantle to heat up and increase the chances of an earthquake or volcanic eruption.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

This is my personal belief. I think the earth has areas underground where the crust dips deep into the mantle and doesnt melt because it has cavernous, water filled bubbles.

In these, like a nesting doll suspended in the middle, lies floating hollow mineral domes with pockets of air. Maybe they arent completely free floating, but rather are protruding up from rock spires forming bubbles at the top and right into the water pocket caverns.

Just my thoughts.

edit on 7 15 2018 by tadaman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 09:05 PM
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the depth of the well in Antarctica is 3,679.15 meters, the depth of the Kola borehole is 12262 meters, and the temperature is 220 ° C. The depth of the wells made by the USA in Hawaii is 3000 meters.it is a lie that is impudent to assert that there are at a depth of 200+ kilometers



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I'm just going to come right out and say it. Aliens have bases there. It's the best place ever to hide. There are things coming from beneath the sea and have been observed by some pretty credible people.
edit on 15-7-2018 by IlluminatiTechnician because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 10:01 PM
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Maybe we should worry less about deep space objects that would and probably will be impossible to ever reach and worry more about what’s already HERE(oceans, deep Earth). I don’t think there’s anything to gain from things like the Crab Nebula, other than cool “pictures”. I suppose the same type of funding scams go for space exploration as archeology, maybe not. Why worry about such a desolate, unlivable place like Mars when all the REALLY cool undiscovered stuff is right here? And we KNOW it’s here, yet we spend tons of money on a “we’ll see” project. I agree that the pictures that Voyager and all the other space probes are VERY cool, but it’s just not realistic IMO to do much more than that with all the GUARANTEED discoveries we will find on Earth. Maybe it’s just me, but it seems flying around visiting other planets, with all the problems here(and the problems with flying around visiting planets like the Twilight Zone) seems very unlikely.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 10:15 PM
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Well, if you had been listening, you'd know that Nintendos pass through everything!

Sorry. Couldn't help myself. Every single time I hear the word "Neutrinos", that's the first thing that pops in my head.

All kidding aside, I haven't yet read the OP's article, but I look forward to doing so.

We (humans, as a species) tend to think we have a good bead on things, but when you consider what we know, or at least what we THINK we know, as opposed to what we DON'T know, it's nothing short of humbling.

I have no doubt that are many, many things we've yet to discover about this magnificent blue globe we inhabit.

Or blue BALL, if you are a "Flat-Earth" idiot.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 11:31 PM
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posted on Jul, 16 2018 @ 12:34 AM
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That's #ing cool as #



posted on Jul, 16 2018 @ 06:14 AM
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originally posted by: mangust69
the depth of the well in Antarctica is 3,679.15 meters, the depth of the Kola borehole is 12262 meters, and the temperature is 220 ° C. The depth of the wells made by the USA in Hawaii is 3000 meters.it is a lie that is impudent to assert that there are at a depth of 200+ kilometers


Do you understand that the temperature that water boils at is dependent on Pressure?

P



posted on Jul, 16 2018 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: pheonix358
I want to say that it is not known what is below these submerged depths, the theory is already lower without evidence, for example in the Kola high methane content, which multiplies the previous theories by zero, and the presence of the mantle has not yet been proven



posted on Jul, 16 2018 @ 08:50 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Cool thread. Love seeing things like this as opposed to the non-stop political crap.

One thing I must correct you on, the outer planets are not "mostly made of water and ice". Many of their moons have ice and a few are suspected to have water. I do agree that water is likely abundant in the universe.



posted on Jul, 16 2018 @ 09:02 AM
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originally posted by: valve
Maybe we should worry less about deep space objects that would and probably will be impossible to ever reach and worry more about what’s already HERE(oceans, deep Earth). I don’t think there’s anything to gain from things like the Crab Nebula, other than cool “pictures”. I suppose the same type of funding scams go for space exploration as archeology, maybe not. Why worry about such a desolate, unlivable place like Mars when all the REALLY cool undiscovered stuff is right here? And we KNOW it’s here, yet we spend tons of money on a “we’ll see” project. I agree that the pictures that Voyager and all the other space probes are VERY cool, but it’s just not realistic IMO to do much more than that with all the GUARANTEED discoveries we will find on Earth. Maybe it’s just me, but it seems flying around visiting other planets, with all the problems here(and the problems with flying around visiting planets like the Twilight Zone) seems very unlikely.


One reason is that the conditions in space are actually easier for us to overcome than the conditions deep within the Earth, given our current technology.

- The difference in pressure between Earth's surface and space is only one atmosphere. The pressure deep within the earth is hundreds or even thousands of atmospheres.
- The temperature difference between Earth's surface and space is only a few hundred degrees. The temperature difference between Earth's surface and its deep interior is thousands of degrees.
- All it really requires to go to space is generating enough force to overcome Earth's gravity, which is relatively weak, for a certain amount of time to get to orbit, followed by some controlled thruster burns to adjust your trajectory wherever you want to go. Using these methods, we can successfully get people hundreds of thousands of miles from Earth and our unmanned probes billions of miles from Earth. Nobody has figured out how to get down inside the Earth further than a few miles. We need significant advances in technology to explore there. We already have the technology to explore space.

I think we should continue to explore both. Who knows what discoveries await in either realm?

*Disclaimer* I oversimplified this obviously. There are other hazards in space: radiation, meteroids, aliens, etc. You need to bring food, water, oxygen, and protection from the above-noted conditions which are relatively simple to achieve. You get the gist though. It's really hard to get into the Earth.



posted on Jul, 16 2018 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: [post=23588083]
it is a lie that is impudent to assert that there are at a depth of 200+ kilometers
They do not claim a bore hole at that depth or any other and since the Earth's radius is over 6,300Km then a depth of +220 is not a lie nor impudent. The mineral in the OP was theorized to be at that depth, due to its crystalline structure, and then ejected to the surface by volcanic activity.

The diamond they were examining had a mineral, ringwoodite, which is a water bearing mineral. According to the article olivine is in the upper mantle which cannot hold much water but deeper down it is reformed into a crystal configuration called wadsleyite. It is this type of rock that is thought to hold water in a chemical bond thus becoming a hydrous mineral. When they mention this mineral produces water when it melts I trust they mean the temperature it takes to melt the rock not water ice.



posted on Jul, 16 2018 @ 11:14 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky
Not long ago it was thought that the only place in our solar system that contained water was on Earth and comets, all other bodies were devoid of water. Now we are finding water everywhere, well except for comets. The dirty snowball theory has taken some hits, water devoid from comet surfaces, and perhaps the water is below the surface. I'll remain skeptical until core samples can are taken, hopefully water ice can be discovered inside of comets.
From you linked article;

Most of these were likely not comets but rather asteroids called carbonaceous chondrites, which can be up to 20 percent water by weight, storing it in a form of hydrogen like ringwoodite.
This reminds me of the samples brought back from the comet Wild2 by the Stardust mission. The line between comet and asteroid has been blurred by the evidence found from that mission. Could comets have the same type of mineral that release water through ionization?


edit on 7/16/2018 by Devino because: (no reason given)




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