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They have got your DNA already

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posted on Jul, 10 2018 @ 11:39 PM
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This is interesting, did you know when you go to Ancestry dot com, they sell off your DNA results to a third party. In fact the people who set this company up, have very close links to Google and the Government. Since Babies now have blood tests at birth, and to get a job in many places you have to have a DNA check, it would be fair to say your on their database, and where is their data base, in Mormon country out in the desert, which is again interesting, as the Mormon involvement as friends of the CIA is quite evident. Since after death you can be baptized into the Mormon faith can we see some sort of Government religious deal?? However I digress...If a third party can get hold of your DNA they can also check to see if you are a good insurance risk ,also whether you are more likely to suffer health issues etc. and thus be employable or not depending on the read out.




posted on Jul, 10 2018 @ 11:43 PM
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Maybe Skynet is real and is acquiring DNA from everyone so it could locate Sarah Connor. The real Sarah Connor and terminate her! Catching serial killers is just good press because no one would object to DNA being used to catch a murderer.



posted on Jul, 10 2018 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: SkepticalRogue123


Read on.. If they have your DNA profile and combine it with you Facebook profile, they then have a link between DNA markers and social Psychological traits. Future crimes that you have a high probability to commit. Or not which could weed the compliant from the problems.



posted on Jul, 10 2018 @ 11:51 PM
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a reply to: anonentity

You know I did the whole 23 and me dna test. First mine came back as inconclusive which I thought was weird then my husband’s came back as the same thing. We followed their instructions exactly.

Kind of freaked us out a bit so the new tests they sent us have been sitting in my office for the last year.



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 12:22 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

As an O- ( type O negative ) blood donor... I was had in 1993. Hmm Mormon+Government+..
Nevermind huge database center in Utah.
This guy.. Mitt Romney?


Edit: I don't have Facebook or Twitter...
But I'm %100 sure my HEMO has been looked into.
edit on 11-7-2018 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)


Also: retired firefighter nurse sooo...
edit on 11-7-2018 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 12:45 AM
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originally posted by: Watcher777
a reply to: anonentity

You know I did the whole 23 and me dna test. First mine came back as inconclusive which I thought was weird then my husband’s came back as the same thing. We followed their instructions exactly.

Kind of freaked us out a bit so the new tests they sent us have been sitting in my office for the last year.

That's interesting. I've done a bunch of these tests over the years and they've always come back okay.

Before the test, I wash my mouth out with water. Then I wait at least 30 - 45 minutes before spitting in the tube. That allows enough cheek cells to build up in the saliva.

I gave the test to my 105 year old aunt. She had no saliva because of her medicine. So, I basically got a whole tube full of loogies. Thank goodness that worked. It took her an hour to get that much and I didn't want her to have to do it again.

-dex



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 12:48 AM
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a reply to: DexterRiley




I gave the test to my 105 year old aunt. She had no saliva because of her medicine. So, I basically got a whole tube full of loogies. Thank goodness that worked. It took her an hour to get that much and I didn't want her to have to do it again. 

-dex


Ohh C'mon!



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 12:54 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

I would hope that these vendors keep this private information in confidence. However, to the best of my knowledge, there are no federal laws that provide that kind of protection. And given the dozen or so pages of terms and conditions, it would be impossible for the normal Internet user to parse it all. And the customer may be giving the testing agency rights to do anything they want with their decoded genome.

Over the years I've had Y-str, mtDNA, CODIS, 23&Me, and Ancestry.com DNA tests. They helped to fill out a lot of my family tree. And I identified my real father and real grandfather. So, there are positive benefits. However, I would advise anyone interested in getting one of these tests to look at the testing agency's contract before proceeding.

-dex



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 12:55 AM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

I made sure we did them in the morning before we had even eaten anything. We joked about mine coming back inconclusive then when his came back the same way we were really surprised.

I read somewhere that some people have to scrape their gums a bit to get some blood in the vile. Although, it didn’t tell us to do that at all.



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 12:58 AM
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a reply to: Bigburgh

I kid you not.

In fact it was the results of her test that was the final evidence that I needed to prove my "father" was not my sire.

I was talking about this the other day with my cousin who went with me when I got the sample from her mother. She was still talking about how nasty it was.

-dex



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 01:02 AM
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originally posted by: Watcher777
a reply to: DexterRiley

I made sure we did them in the morning before we had even eaten anything. We joked about mine coming back inconclusive then when his came back the same way we were really surprised.

I read somewhere that some people have to scrape their gums a bit to get some blood in the vile. Although, it didn’t tell us to do that at all.

That could very well be the case. I remember reading, or it may have been an episode of CSI, that some people don't have traceable DNA in their saliva.

Although it's also possible you all are aliens.


-dex



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 01:23 AM
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originally posted by: DexterRiley
a reply to: Bigburgh

I kid you not.

In fact it was the results of her test that was the final evidence that I needed to prove my "father" was not my sire.

I was talking about this the other day with my cousin who went with me when I got the sample from her mother. She was still talking about how nasty it was.

-dex


Then you surely realize


There is no privacy

edit on 11-7-2018 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 01:34 AM
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Originally posted by: Bigburgh
a reply to: DexterRiley

Lol I am laughing my damn ass off!!! Why Bigburgh...

I'm totally stressing about another eye surgery tomorrow and I'm cracking up over this. Why????

edit on 11-7-2018 by Wookiep because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 02:02 AM
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a reply to: Wookiep

Will they do blood draw? Bwahahahaha 😁

No but they always check your hemo just in case. Bwahahahaha



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 02:04 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

I'm not sure about ancestry.com but "23 & me" is owned by Anne E. Wojcicki.

You know who her husband is? Sergey Brin. CEO of Alphabet ( parent company of Google.)

You know who her sister is? Susan Diane Wojcicki. The CEO of YouTube.

Don't think for a second that these people will do the right thing with your DNA.



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 02:16 AM
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originally posted by: DexterRiley
a reply to: anonentity

However, I would advise anyone interested in getting one of these tests to look at the testing agency's contract before proceeding.

-dex


I wouldn't even trust them then.
Once they have it, you simply cannot tell me that they will dispose of it, or the info given. I don't mean aggregate info like xx% of men 28-40 have at least some chance of cancer, etc.

I mean personally unique to an individual info. Call it (UI)

I also have no doubt that either the contract can be wiggled out of; The UI will be shared. Given to a holding company, warrant search by government, etc.

Simple way is either go to an independent lab and watch them do your analysis and remove the samples with you, and make damn sure the info is deleted from thier computers, in front of you. And I don't see any laboratory allowing you to see that. Even if that were possible, hard drives can be stolen, 'lost', etc......and usually even 'erased' data isn't erased.

Example: You wite a letter on your PC, save it , print it, and them delete it. The letter itself isn't deleted; just the index files saying where it is.

And don't forget the big issue: Human Greed. Someone will always pay for that info.

Drug tests where they do a cheek swab? You betcha someones got your UI DNA.

TBH, this, and fingerprint scanners for work (time clock, etc) creep me out too......

Easiest way is, dont do it.

Honestly, I suspect it's too late for 90% of use past the age of infancy.


p.s. Remember when the popular thing was having your children's' UI DNA taken ''just in case'', usually for free, by local civic organization, like Lions, Rotary, etc? I wonder how many people that will come back to haunt?



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 02:17 AM
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a reply to: Bigburgh

I gave it a lot of thought before I decided to do it. I was always aware that my data could be leaked. I've got no biological children, so my genome ends with me.

But the information that I gleaned from those tests was worth the chance in my opinion.

-dex



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 02:18 AM
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originally posted by: Wookiep
Originally posted by: Bigburgh
a reply to: DexterRiley

Lol I am laughing my damn ass off!!! Why Bigburgh...

I'm totally stressing about another eye surgery tomorrow and I'm cracking up over this. Why????


Also im not up to date with your oculars.
I hope whatever procedure you are having is successful 👍👍

And I just got glasses for the first time. And hearing aids. I'm a mechanized Helen Keller 😆



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 02:22 AM
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originally posted by: DexterRiley
a reply to: Bigburgh

I gave it a lot of thought before I decided to do it. I was always aware that my data could be leaked. I've got no biological children, so my genome ends with me.

But the information that I gleaned from those tests was worth the chance in my opinion.

-dex


My tree ends with me too. (Natural selectio... causes they say)
So I get you.



posted on Jul, 11 2018 @ 02:56 AM
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I haven't done any of these tests, but after 18 years military they got my DNA with multiple vials of blood drawn every year.

Just like with my personal information, the fed has been hacked and I have received a notice each time about my information possibly being compromised.

Its not worth worrying about, if they want it they will get it.




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