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A Meteorologist Explains Why the Extreme Heat is Way Worse Than You Think

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posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 12:19 AM
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a reply to: FyreByrd


Global dimming is not thought to be due to changes in the sun's luminosity, as these have been too small to explain the magnitude of dimming observed.

Instead, air pollution from human activity is thought to be the major contributor. Aerosols which form from pollution can directly reflect and absorb radiation before it reaches the planet's surface and make clouds brighter and longer lasting, meaning they reflect more sunlight.

So the reflective particles from our pollution has caused up to a 4-8% dimming in some areas, that's a considerably large percentage of the sun light being reflected back into space, and the light from Earth is the single most important variable affecting the temperature of Earth. Do they even take this into account when calculating how much warming should occur due to our pollution because at a quick glance I find it hard to believe the warming effects would be greater than the cooling effects caused by the dimming.
edit on 9/7/2018 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 01:54 AM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd



Nick Humphrey is a meteorologist and geoscientist in Lincoln, Nebraska, who runs the “Ocean’s Wrath” blog and studies the nature of these events in relation to ocean storms and climate.




Am I the only one who thinks it odd that a guy that writes about ocean climate for a blog titled "Ocean's Wrath" lives in Lincoln, Nebraska, quite possibly the furthest place in the US from any ocean?



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 02:07 AM
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a reply to: ChaoticOrder

It was a paper I read some time back where a scientist went looking for methane release and found a lot more being released than had been expected. (in the pacific)

I have been looking for it but haven't seen it in some time so take it with a grain of salt.

To me we are all wrapped up in a chicken or the egg argument, either way things are changing rather than freaking out over trying to stop natural change (which I still think the majority of it is), we should be learning how to adapt to the changes so we can survive long enough to get off this rock and to a new world.


Or I could just be crazy...



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 05:10 AM
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I feel that it will get very hot spreading new diseases, making the air unable to breathe in cities, water shortages leading to even more diseases. A large portion of the world population dies off. Then the Earth will start to cool again. The trees in SC seem to snap off and fall over now in hurricanes, tornados, ice storms, and any rainy weather. I have a small woods in my yard and five trees fell over this spring in a microburst EF0 the whole neighbor hood was torn up. It wasn't even on the news. One neighbor had twenty trees fall over. The electric pole snapped into four pieces. Ring worm and poison ivy are more contagious and common too.



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 05:21 AM
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Mother Earth Cannot be controlled. No matter what some Meterologist has to say. I diss the weather channel often because they're never accurate. The guy that created the Weather Channel agrees with me.



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 08:14 AM
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We can change our habits to reduce our carbon footprint, well, it's better than nothing.

cotap.org...



Palm oil is a globally traded commodity used in a wide array of common consumer products, from shampoo to cookies. And much of this palm oil is produced in ways that involve the destruction of tropical forests and peatlands, adding to global warming emissions and reducing habitat for many already threatened species.


www.ucsusa.org...

The scorecard at the link will help those that want to reduce their carbon footprint make better choices.


palmoilscorecard.panda.org...



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 08:17 AM
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All winter long: "Cold weather is not related to global warming or climate change omg shut up people!!111"

All summer long: "Why the hot temperatures spell the end of the Earth thanks to mad made climate change!!111"



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 08:21 AM
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originally posted by: jjkenobi
All winter long: "Cold weather is not related to global warming or climate change omg shut up people!!111"

All summer long: "Why the hot temperatures spell the end of the Earth thanks to mad made climate change!!111"


Rather the hot temperatures, specifically when certain areas' temps rise to 1.5 degrees above normal, then crop failure is a surety.



Johan Rockström, Earth League Chair and Director of Stockholm Resilience Centre, says the Paris Agreement "sends the signal to the global economy that decarbonisation starts today. The Global Carbon Project’s carbon budget published during the conference gives the first sign that this is underway." Rockström, believes that many have now awoken to the fact that serious climate action is essential, and that the Agreement signals a turning point. "We are starting to see that sustainable solutions not only exist but they are also adaptable and deliverable on various levels in society as a whole." For sticking to 1.5°C, he argues that is essential that rich countries lead in action towards zero fossil fuel use by 2030.


www.the-earth-league.org...



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 08:49 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight


Rather the hot temperatures, specifically when certain areas' temps rise to 1.5 degrees above normal, then crop failure is a surety.

I already explained why that is incorrect.

In the movie Idiocracy, people were too dumb to understand that the crops were growing without live video evidence being splashed in their faces. Are we to that point? If so, we're doomed because I'm not setting up a live video feed.

The crops are doing quite well here, despite the heat wave. If anything, they're doing better than normal. The corn is as green as can be and the soybeans are some of the lushest I have seen in several years.

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 10:05 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

The temperatures here are normal but the crops suck. Why?

Because they don't have enough Brawndo. They're missing electrolytes -- what plants crave.

Actually, it's because we haven't had enough rain. We always depend on early spring thunderstorm complexes, and while they have happened, our river is in minor flood stage now actually, they just haven't happened in this broad area. So our local crops aren't doing well.



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 10:11 AM
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The climate scientists' findings re: the 1.5 degree rise and subsequent crop failures were predicted for the equatorial regions, first. As well, we should look at countries that do not have the technology to handle problems or any type of coping systems in place, so there are other factors to consider.




Study co-author Dr Evan Fraser, also of the University of Leeds, said: "It appears that more developed countries with a higher GDP tend to evolve more advanced coping mechanisms for extreme events. In China this is happening organically as the economy is growing quickly, but poorer regions such as Africa are likely to require more in the way of aid for such development.


www.sciencedaily.com...
edit on 17CDT10America/Chicago017101031 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

That's the real difference: water. It's rained so much here I can't get the yard mowed. I'm about to rent my yard out for a hay field, since the grass is growing as well as the crops.

You need certain things to grow good crops: warmth, water, sun, nutrition, and carbon dioxide. We have all five in excess now, and people are worried the crops are going to fail. According to the doom-sayers, Global Warming raises the temperature slightly, causes more storms and more rain, doesn't decrease the sunshine, doesn't affect nutrients, and increases carbon dioxide... all good things for crop production. *sigh* I remember when growing plants wasn't a subject of debate...

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 10:19 AM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: InTheLight

The temperatures here are normal but the crops suck. Why?

Because they don't have enough Brawndo. They're missing electrolytes -- what plants crave.

Actually, it's because we haven't had enough rain. We always depend on early spring thunderstorm complexes, and while they have happened, our river is in minor flood stage now actually, they just haven't happened in this broad area. So our local crops aren't doing well.


And it appears you have no coping strategies to deal with this change.



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 10:29 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

All I can say is, thank God we have more farmers than 'scientists,' or we'd all starve.

Except me; I can plant a seed without an empirical study.

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 10:31 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: InTheLight

All I can say is, thank God we have more farmers than 'scientists,' or we'd all starve.

Except me; I can plant a seed without an empirical study.

TheRedneck


But can you save it from failing due to extreme climate changes is the question?



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

I always have. And I don't need "coping mechanisms."

Apparently you missed the post(s) where I divulged how well our crops are doing.

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 10:39 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: InTheLight

I always have. And I don't need "coping mechanisms."

Apparently you missed the post(s) where I divulged how well our crops are doing.

TheRedneck


But this is not just about your crops (not an isolated region), this should be about all crops around the world and how they are being affected or will be affected.



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 10:41 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

Is it your contention that seeds in Africa grow differently from seeds in America?

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 11:00 AM
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originally posted by: pheonix358



Prior to human-induced global warming, climate changes were relatively slow over the course of hundreds to thousands of years.


More of the same crap.

Climate change is due to the fact that the ice will soon start growing. It is just a natural cycle.

Is man speeding it up? Don't know. The last time this happened it was about 110,000 years ago.



It is just the earth's cycle.

P


funny that your own chart has the CO2 concentration much more higher now than it was going back 1,000,000 years...how is that "just the earth's cycle"?........let me ask you.....if you were getting a divorce, would you want a lawyer that specialized in corporate law or a lawyer that specialized in divorce law?



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 11:00 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: InTheLight

Is it your contention that seeds in Africa grow differently from seeds in America?

TheRedneck


You've missed my point entirely. (Sigh) It is the climate scientists' contention that crop failure is a surety due to abrupt climate change and an inability to deal with it at the ground level.



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