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Surrey earthquake: English county hit by third quake in two weeks

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posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 10:50 AM
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www.independent.co.uk...

It seems that here in the UK, we're getting more quakes! I wonder what could be causing it? Are there sites underground being tested with new weapons maybe? What about the 'CERN' project? 3 Quakes in Surrey the last 2 weeks! This isn't normal for Surrey or England.



Surrey has been shaken by its third earthquake in two weeks. The tremor was described as sounding “like two huge explosions,” and feeling “much bigger than the last two recent quakes”. The 3.1 magnitude quake hit at 10.53 in Newdigate on Thursday, at a depth of 5km, according to the British Geological Survey. The organisation initially said it was magnitude 3.




These aren't huge quakes by any means but the latest is a 3.1 which is more than the previous 2 quakes. Is something possibly brewing underneath the UK?

You know I mentioned CERN? hasn't there been a huge increase in activity since that machine was tested? i'm sure there has been.

Here is a statement from the British Geological team:



A statement by the British Geological Survey said: “We are unable to say categorically if these earthquakes are related to hydrocarbon exploration or production in the Weald, mainly because of the uncertainties in our estimates of the earthquake epicentres and depths.” The statement added: “While it is well known that hydrocarbon exploration and production can result in man-made or ‘induced’ earthquakes, such events usually result from either long term hydrocarbon extraction, or the injection of fluids (eg hydraulic fracturing) during production. “It seems unlikely that flow testing, even if it had taken place, would result in induced seismicity.”

edit on CDTThu, 05 Jul 2018 10:54:17 -05000000003110x117x1 by TruthxIsxInxThexMist because: (no reason given)


Even felt at Gatwick Airport where some described it as sounding and feeling like 'explosions'.

news.sky.com...


edit on CDTThu, 05 Jul 2018 11:00:56 -05000000003111x156x1 by TruthxIsxInxThexMist because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 11:09 AM
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It's about time we start respecting our earth more.

It reminds me of the cartoon Dinosaurs where after destroying their environment the Dad Dinosaur tells his son that dinosaurs have been around forever and they're not just going to disappear, only that's exactly what happened. Granted that was a cartoon but I can't help but feel the creators of that cartoon was leaving us a message about the destruction us humans are having on the earth.

These earthquakes, heat waves, strange weather phenomena and natural disasters happening every day all over the world are Earth's way of crying out to us.

I'm not saying it's directly related but I sincerely hope that the UK stop fracking and put an outright ban on it. I can't help but feel that plays a huge part in these type of things...



posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Reminds me of this:




posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

How often does Surrey get earthquakes? Before this sequence of quakes, when was the last one recorded in that area?

-dex



posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 12:35 PM
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Lots of mining in that area? could just be mines settling down shall we say as once one bit fails it slowly drags something else last visited in 1850 down.



posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 01:09 PM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Well last time I noticed it rumbling in the UK was dec 22 2010...

I remember because I made a thread about it...



I'm pretty sure there must have been more little quakes inbetween then and now but I wasn't paying attention...lol

Peace
edit on 2018pAmerica/ChicagoThu, 05 Jul 2018 13:15:00 -0500pm311520187 by operation mindcrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Fracking perhaps?



posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: operation mindcrime

There's been quite a lot actually. I have read about them and I never used to hear about many at all.



posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 02:37 PM
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Why the obsession with CERN? Earthquakes are quite common in Britain, most of which are not felt. As to the cause, well that's to do with geology.

British Geological Survey



posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 02:37 PM
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originally posted by: DexterRiley
a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

How often does Surrey get earthquakes? Before this sequence of quakes, when was the last one recorded in that area?

-dex


Well, I just had a look at wiki and there hasn't been any recorded quakes in or around Surrey since records began so this is kind of new for the area.

Here's a list of 20th and 21st Century quakes on the Brit Isles:

18 September 1901 Inverness, Highland, Scotland ~5.0 [3]
19 June 1903 Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales 4.9 [3]
27 June 1906 Swansea, Wales 5.2 One of the most damaging British earthquakes of the 20th century.[3][23]
14 January 1916 Stafford, Staffordshire, England 4.6 Felt from Lancaster to Bristol.[3]
30 July 1926 Jersey, Channel Islands [3]
15 August 1926 Ludlow, Shropshire, England 4.8 [3]
24 January 1927 North Sea 5.7 [3]
7 June 1931 Dogger Bank, North Sea 6.1 Strongest officially recorded. See 1931 Dogger Bank earthquake.[3]
12 December 1940 North Wales 4.7 An elderly woman was killed after she fell down the stairs.[3][24]
30 December 1944 Skipton, North Yorkshire, England 4.8 Felt throughout northern England.[3][25]
11 February 1957 Derby, Derbyshire, England 5.3 Felt across central England. Largest UK post-war earthquake until 1984, and one of the most damaging earthquakes of the twentieth century.[3]
9 February 1958 North Sea 5.1 Felt throughout eastern England.[3]
9 August 1970 Kirkby Stephen, Cumbria, England 4.1 [3]
10 August 1974 Kintail, Highland, Scotland 4.4 [3]
26 December 1979 Longtown, Cumbria, England 4.7 Felt throughout northern England and southern Scotland.[3]
19 July 1984 Llŷn Peninsula, Gwynedd, Wales 5.4 Felt across Ireland and western Great Britain. See 1984 Llŷn Peninsula earthquake.[3]
29 September 1986 Oban, Argyll and Bute, Scotland 4.1 [3]
2 April 1990 Bishop's Castle, Shropshire, England 5.1 Felt throughout most of England and Wales; numerous chimneys collapsed in Shrewsbury. See 1990 Bishop's Castle earthquake.[3]
15 February 1994 Norwich, Norfolk, England 4.0 [3]
4 March 1999 Isle of Arran, North Ayrshire, Scotland 4.0 [3]
23 September 2000 Warwick, Warwickshire, England 4.2 Felt across the Midlands.[3]
21st century
Date Epicentre M L [displaystyle M_[L]] M_L Notes
31 May 2001 Bristol Channel 25 miles west of Bude 3.6 Felt across Devon and Cornwall.[26]
28 October 2001 Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, England 4.1 Felt across the East Midlands.[3]
13 February 2002 South Wales ~3.0 Felt in South Wales Valleys.[27]
22 September 2002 Dudley, West Midlands, England 4.7 Felt between Liverpool and London. See 2002 Dudley earthquake.[3]
21 October 2002 Manchester, Greater Manchester, England 3.2 (08:45)
2.3 (09:04)
3.9 (12:42)
3.5 (12:43) 3.9 magnitude earthquake followed by a 3.5 magnitude event 22 seconds later.[3][28] Largest event in an earthquake swarm that occurred in the centre of Manchester between October 2002 and January 2003. During this swarm, over 110 tremors were recorded, with 30 being strong enough to be felt.[29][30][31] The swarm was unexplained; however, it is believed the Red Rock fault system was a possible trigger.[32]
14 February 2005 Conwy, Wales 3.3 [33]
26 December 2006 Dumfries, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland 3.6 [34]
28 April 2007 Folkestone, Kent, England 4.3 See 2007 Kent earthquake.[35]
27 February 2008 Market Rasen, Lincolnshire, England 5.2 Felt widely in England and Wales. See 2008 Lincolnshire earthquake.[36]
26 October 2008 Bromyard, Herefordshire, England 3.6 [37]
15 January 2009 Shetland, Scotland 3.3 [38]
3 March 2009 Folkestone, Kent, England 3.0 [39]
11 April 2009 Goxhill, Lincolnshire, England 3.0 [40]
28 April 2009 Ulverston, Cumbria, England 3.7 Felt around Barrow, Kendal, Windermere, Fleetwood and in other parts of north Lancashire.[41][42]
1 September 2010 Central North Sea 3.5 [43]
21 December 2010 Coniston, Cumbria, England 3.5 Felt across Cumbria and also in Dumfries & Galloway, Lancashire and on the Isle of Man.[44][45]
3 January 2011 Ripon, North Yorkshire, England 3.6 Felt across Yorkshire and Cumbria.[46]
23 January 2011 Glenuig, Highland, Scotland 3.5 Felt across the western Highlands, including in Inverness, on Skye and in Oban.[47]
1 April 2011 Blackpool, Lancashire, England 2.3 Felt across Blackpool. The tremor was later found to have been caused by fracking carried out by Cuadrilla.[48]
27 May 2011 Blackpool, Lancashire, England 1.5 Felt across Blackpool. The tremor was later found to have been caused by fracking carried out by Caudrilla.[48]
14 July 2011 English Channel, Portsmouth, Hampshire, England 3.9 [49]
29 May 2013 Llŷn Peninsula, Gwynedd, Wales 3.8 Felt across Ireland and Wales.[50][51]
25 August 2013 Irish Sea, Blackpool, Lancashire, England 2.4-3.3 Felt in Blackpool, England.[52][53]
20 February 2014 Bristol Channel, England 4.1 Felt in Somerset, North Devon and South Wales.[54]
17 April 2014 Rutland, England 3.2 Felt between Melton Mowbray and Oakham.[55]
18 April 2014 Rutland, England 3.5 Also felt between Oakham and Melton Mowbray, with the epicentre in Rutland.[56]
20 May 2014 North Sea, England 3.4 The earthquake occurred in the Sheffield area near Hillsborough barracks.[57]
11 July 2014 Jersey, Channel Islands 4.3 Occurred at 11:54 UTC, with the epicentre approximately 15 km west of Jersey. It was felt by 100 people in the Channel Islands, Southern England and parts of France.[58]
23 July 2014 Jersey, Channel Islands 3.3 Occurred at 16:26 UTC. Believed to be an aftershock from the 11 July earthquake.[59]
28 January 2015 Rutland, England 3.8 The epicentre was near the town of Oakham.[60]
22 May 2015 Sandwich, Kent, England 4.2 The tremor originated in Sandwich but could also be felt in other areas, such as Canterbury, Margate and Southend-on-Sea. The earthquake struck at 02:52 BST.[61]
26 May 2015 Gwynedd, Wales 3.0 [62]
4 January 2017 North_Sea, 100 miles (150km) east of Scarborough,_North_Yorkshire, England 3.8 (18:52 GMT) [63]
4 August 2017 Moidart, Highland, Scotland 3.8 (15:43)
3.4 (15:45) Felt across the west Highlands. The earthquake struck at 15:45 BST.
17 February 2018 Cwmllynfell, Neath Port Talbot, Wales 4.6[64] Felt across south Wales and as far as Cornwall, Liverpool, Shrewsbury and Somerset. The earthquake struck at 14:31.[65]
28 February 2018 Mosser, Cumbria, England 3.2 Felt in Grasmere, Kendal, Cockermouth and Keswick.[66]
9 June 2018 Spurn, East Riding of Yorkshire, England 4.0[67] Felt throughout Lincolnshire and surrounding counties. Its epicentre was in Spurn, East Riding of Yorkshire.



posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Probably from the results of outlawing knives,it's the consorted effort of tenderizing meat so an englishman can eat meat without ripping his teeth out



posted on Jul, 5 2018 @ 09:40 PM
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its the mole people, they're always after our ummm, what do moles like?

Kinda interesting, could be a hyperloop tunnel being built, or more elite bunkers
edit on 5-7-2018 by Tranceopticalinclined because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2018 @ 06:39 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist


OK so quakes are not that unusual but most are below 3 and very few ever get over 4 but this will become increasingly more common because of increasingly aggressive fracking around the country, you would be surprised how much fracking in another county can affect as well.

Up here in Lancashire we had a long running legal fight which we won against frackers but then the government (personal investments of friends' and family of the government I very strongly suspect) over ruled the court decision and allowed the fracking to go ahead.

Disastrous for us since most of our populated land is sandy especially near to the coast.

Take a bucket of sand and put a coin on top of the sand or better yet a ball bearing then put the bucket of sand on a shaking surface and watch that coin or ball bearing sink, this is because of agitation and the heavier object then subsides.
This is exactly what shall happen to Southport, Blackpool, Liverpool, Birkenhead (Cheshire as well since there geography is almost identical) and much of greater Manchester as well and all the other community's on the sand rich soil areas of Lancashire, Cheshire and other county's with similar geography, massive amount's of structural damage due to subsidence and other problem's such as polluted ground water.

The result's of Fracking is that it can and WILL trigger dormant fault's in the rock, fault's that often have a lot of stored up energy triggering earthquakes while at the same time the act of fracking itself causes shock waves which can be argued to be man made earthquakes.

Now while we get natural earthquakes and in all likely hood this was just such an event I do often lament at the wanton idiocy and hypocrisy of the greedy politician's letting international corporations tear up our country.



posted on Jul, 6 2018 @ 07:06 AM
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Check out duchsinse on YouTube he'll explain it in detail so you'll have a heads up next time round
It's a very good EQ explainer where they come from and where they're going to be serious like! Cheers



posted on Jul, 6 2018 @ 09:16 AM
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a reply to: LABTECH767

I think you are over exaggerating the impact of fracking. Basically, you are saying fracking will destroy the North West. It's this kind of alarmist talk that discredits the actual impact.



posted on Jul, 6 2018 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: paraphi

I am most certainly NOT over exaggerating.
Why don't you go and do what I say, get a bucket of sand, put a ball bearing on tip and hit the side of the bucket a few times' with a hammer to simulate the explosions used in fracking to shatter the deep strata rock's - often near dormant fault lines - to free up trapped hydrocarbon reserves.

It will not DESTROY the north west but for all that lovely profit those petrochemical barons will make out of it we will have to pay more in the form of structural repair's, cracks in road's, subsidence problems' and of course related health problems' in the form of water table pollution which is a well known side effect of fracking over in the state's.

So in fact it will cost more to get that oil than it will make in profit BUT the petrochemical company STILL make's vast profit for itself and it's shareholders while the loss is on the public whom end up indirectly subsidizing through the damage they have to suffer AND by the time someone has to answer assuming the corrupt crew in charge of Whitehall don't block such litigation these bandit's will have scarpered while there shareholders will have what they want having pulled a fast one on the public.


Look there is a group of people, mostly TORY's whom are all about money, they are NOT about our people or even our nation except and in so far as it is to there own personal benefit - often short term benefit being the key word with those lout's.
IF that was not the case we would have had Salters Duck's making free tidal and wave energy, reducing our coastal erosion and even exporting green energy to Europe making a mega profit BUT that IS the case now is'nt it.

edit on 6-7-2018 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2018 @ 11:52 AM
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originally posted by: LABTECH767
I am most certainly NOT over exaggerating.
Why don't you go and do what I say, get a bucket of sand, put a ball bearing on tip and hit the side of the bucket a few times' with a hammer to simulate the explosions used in fracking to shatter the deep strata rock's - often near dormant fault lines - to free up trapped hydrocarbon reserves.


Er, the NW is not a bucket of sand. It's a diverse mix of complex geology. While I understand the analogy, I think it's too simplistic for the real world.

It's a fact that fracking has geological implications, just like mining or oil/gas extraction. Whether this will manifest into destructive earthquakes in the UK is moot, especially as the levels of fracking is going to be modest. Regardless, fracking seems to have brought out a lot of pseudoscience and quackery, which has made unpicking the truth difficult.

My main objection to fracking is the industrialisation of the countryside, if they can find room between the wind and solar farms.



posted on Jul, 6 2018 @ 12:16 PM
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a reply to: paraphi

thats a pretty asinine reply, are you some kind of policy sychophant?
"My main objection to fracking is the industrialisation of the countryside, if they can find room between the wind and solar farms."
do you know what EROI means?
have you looked at the hills group report on depletion from 2013.
" Regardless, fracking seems to have brought out a lot of pseudoscience and quackery, which has made unpicking the truth difficult. "
not really!
regardless?
you appear to have little regard for labtecs very well explained position or renewable power.
i detect a hostile old bore who reads the telegraph
edit on 6-7-2018 by username74 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2018 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: username74

You obviously don't live in the country then, but the industrialisation of the countryside is a problem. Fracking will just make more of a mess - pollution, industrial development, heavy traffic, and all that. As I say, fighting for space between the solar farms and wind turbines. So, nothing asinine about it, or boorish.

I don't believe that destructive earthquakes will be, or are, an inevitable outcome of fracking.

Cheer up and keep it civil.



posted on Jul, 6 2018 @ 03:10 PM
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Here is a risk map for that area and it looks like earthquakes up to 3.5 are normal.

"DATE 05/07/2018
ORIGIN TIME 10:53:26.5 UTC
LOCATION 51.148 -0.260
DEPTH 5 km
MAGNITUDE 3.0
LOCALITY NEWDIGATE,SURREY"

That seems to be the most recent and largest. Is it possible that people have the impression it is more, since people now are informed about earthquakes they could not actually feel or would have ignored were they not watching for them? If it's been in the news at all, expect to see many false reports due to mistaking something else for a quake.



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