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Distant Mars Rock with Head?

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posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 07:23 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Archivalist
Why post here?
You should notify JPL since they seem to have missed it.


Nahhh they know...
Who do you think are hearding the cows...




posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 10:53 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: schuyler

I can unclearly see a guy standing in the distance with his arms raised over his head at an angle.

Maybe it's a stickup!



"I was going to say I saw a ducky and a horsy, but I changed my mind."

-- Charlie Brown




posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 11:09 AM
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originally posted by: Jefferton

originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: schuyler

I can unclearly see a guy standing in the distance with his arms raised over his head at an angle.

Maybe it's a stickup!


Usually your posts make some sense. Usually.

Usually people have a sense of humor. Usually.

You're so funny!



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 11:49 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

Unfortunately, I don't think the rover will ever get closer to it to get a good look at it:


Indeed, Curiosity seems to be equipped with a "point-of-interest avoidance sensor" or something similar. Things like that never seem to pique her interest for some reason.

And she'll never detect life, past or present, even if she could (technically speaking). It's not part of the mission objectives, but I mentioned that before didn't I? Huge conspiracy, I know.

If all goes according to plan, the next press conference will reveal "features that may represent the effects of biological processes". That's part of the official biological objectives and something they haven't announced yet. But that's about as far as we get with Curiosity, everything else will be up to the 2020 rover...




posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 11:57 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
There's blue dirt where you live?

When I was a kid, I actually lived in Blue Earth, Minnesota. Valley of the Jolly Green Giant. And yes, the dirt was rich and dark with a bit of bluish clay in it, so it looked blue. Not sky blue, but comparatively blue.

Anyway, this is at least a little better image of it. At least it shows that it's not just a dark shadow on a distant hill. I think it's interesting, and I wonder how it got that way, other than the obvious "weathering."

edit on 3-7-2018 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 01:32 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: schuyler

I can unclearly see a guy standing in the distance with his arms raised over his head at an angle.


And a closer look...



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 01:54 PM
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originally posted by: Archivalist
Including evidence of large mollusk shells.

You mean like this one?

It would be more impressive if it had growth rings. But the appendages are interesting. Not parallel. Not likely sedimentary layers.
edit on 3-7-2018 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: Phage

They are playing a game of funding/media chess.

They know, they didn't miss anything. They won't publish one iota of information claiming that it is, what they think it is.

They are waiting, which is the smart move.

Being right slow, in space exploration, is smarter than being wrong fast.

Once Exo touches down, Curiosity team will open some floodgates on publication, as they'll have a second team capable of confirming suspicions.

imgur.com...



i.imgur.com...


Here is the meat of what I was referring to, this is just the nautiloid/ammonitic shell. This is not the other organism/rock formation, I was referring to.

However, I have seen these types of formations in several mast cam images, across multiple SOL's vast distances apart.

Find me a natural example of rocks that geologically form into ammonite shell spirals with proper ratios.

Good? Found the one random example? Ok, now find me the same thing but with an occurrence rate that would put it miles apart on Mars, occurring the same way.

Anyone that wonders why I look, explicitly, for shell patterns on Mars.
I've done some research into what would occur if you took ancient Earth ocean organisms and dropped them on Mars.
Why? Because ancient impactors had bookoo loads of force. We get little rocks from Mars that land on Earth, from time to time. Surely, the reverse does happen.

Either way, the chemical composition of crustacean and mollusk shells is such that the shell's physical structure could subsist on Mars for long periods.

The heating and refreezing of the calcium carbonate formations + the high CO2 content would essentially just make the shell structure transition between a few intermediary forms, but always end up back at something akin to calcium carbonate, and would absorb any and all moisture from around themselves as they do it.

(Part of that interaction has an absorption factor for H2O that exceeds desiccant silica gel packets by about 4 to 12 times as absorbent. Want to find where the water on Mars went? Transitionary chemical reactions.)


edit on 3-7-2018 by Archivalist because: meh

edit on 3-7-2018 by Archivalist because: mollusk why mollusk cry

edit on 3-7-2018 by Archivalist because: how do i put duh image

edit on 3-7-2018 by Archivalist because: ugh this board code is annoying



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 01:59 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Phage from schuyler

I can unclearly see a guy standing in the distance with his arms raised over his head at an angle.

Maybe it's a stickup!


Usually your posts make some sense. Usually.


They used to. I used to look forward to Phage's responses on most everything.....not so much any more


Dorian
edit on 3-7-2018 by DorianSoran because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-7-2018 by DorianSoran because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 03:28 PM
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originally posted by: Archivalist
Curiosity has 2 Megapixel cams, max.

1 megapixel, it takes 1024 x 1024 photos.


Still waiting for EXO

ExoMars PanCam will have exactly the same resolution.



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 06:00 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

#1
"Two, megapixel cams"

#2
EXOmars will be banging out with a cam capable of collated 14 Megapixel imagery.
Definitely not the same. Either way, on the software and hardware scale, it will be better AND faster than Curiosity in terms of processing and transmission. It will give us superior images. If it could not, why bother sending it, at all?

Even with the same photoreceptor:
Zoom in closer, take 1024x1024, move to next square, do again.

If the ZOOM functionality is better than Curiosity, these will absolutely provide more clear imagery.
edit on 3-7-2018 by Archivalist because: extra DIV



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 06:05 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Nice find. I've seen higher definition anomalies with shell comparisons than that one, though.

While it does look VERY enticing, it could also be heated rock that cooled into spheroidal shape, then degraded by weathering.

If it showed the compartmented chambers, or a full spiral, would be far more convincing.



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 06:07 PM
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There's absolutely NOTHING out of the ordinary in ANY of those pics. You are looking at Mars' rocky terrain. Nothing more, nothing less. Your imagination is clearly taking over...
edit on 3-7-2018 by Kromlech because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: Kromlech

Very constructive.

Human eyes and process patterns in the brain do not create false negatives though.

If there is something to find, it will be noticed the exact same.

Unless you have your own personal rover, you can't nullify the OP's idea with a statement.

"Pareidolia, as a flaw, is a misinterpretation."

We are better at seeing patterns and facial recognition than 99% of all technological devices that we have created, which attempt to do so.

My conundrum with this fact is that scrutiny writes off the possibility, but doing so is actually dismissive in a non-constructive way.

If we are better than machines at this type of recognition, why do we "trust" machines to find it and distrust human interpretation?

Humans are better at finding positive positives.
Yes, we get false positives, but I'd be willing to bet our rate of false negatives beats a machine by magnitudes.



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 06:31 PM
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originally posted by: Archivalist
#1
"Two, megapixel cams"

I understand it now.



#2
EXOmars will be banging out with a cam capable of collated 14 Megapixel imagery.

Do you have a source for that information? I could only find specifications for a 1 megapixel camera.


Even with the same photoreceptor:
Zoom in closer, take 1024x1024, move to next square, do again.

If the ZOOM functionality is better than Curiosity, these will absolutely provide more clear imagery.

I bet things will be the same, as the interesting finds in the photos are usually a couple of pixels wide, the lack of resolution is what makes them interesting.


edit on 3/7/2018 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2018 @ 06:36 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

They released a pdf file with a planned spec sheet. I have it on another computer, it's probably still online somewhere.

I obtained the information from the spec planning.

I'm doing some coding work on my primary system at the moment, I'll see if I can find it for you later.



posted on Jul, 4 2018 @ 07:50 AM
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a reply to: Archivalist

That would be great.~



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 04:22 PM
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Creepy.

mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

Sort of similar to the creeper on Sol 710:


It's an infestation.



posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

I found this rock quite interesting on one of my trips to Mars ,,





And speaking of pareidolia




posted on Jul, 9 2018 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: Gargoyle91
a reply to: Blue Shift

I found this rock quite interesting on one of my trips to Mars ,,

Kind of reminds me of this one. I wonder what would make a rock look like is was melted around the bottom like that?

edit on 9-7-2018 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



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