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Wars For WATER, Not Oil!

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posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 04:57 PM
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"As the world's population's exploding,
Wars for water, not oil"
- Jello Biafra (LARD - War Pimp Renaissance)

That line from that song always haunted me.

Then I read about 10 yrs ago that the Bush family purchased the largest underground aquifer in South America, somewhere in Uruguay or Paraguay...

Now on NPR today, 2 stories back to back on how a new Illinois plant will be needing 15 million gallons a day from the great lakes, and how other Great lake states are not happy with that. And how Florida is heavily disputing Georgia's blockage and usage of freshwater previously flowing across state borders.

Then I'm watching this real cringy creepy show about a messed up rich family called "Succession" where the character played by Alan Ruck (Cameron from Ferris Beuler's Day Off) says to his kid something to the tune of...
... "Guess what Daddy just bought?... The largest aquifer in the tri state area.. That's because real soon people are going to be killing each other over fresh water..." (Beginning of Ep1Se1)

What the whaaaaat?

(YES it's a fictional TV show...I know...produced by millionaires who have probably more an ear to the ground about these things than you or I...)

Then for all the religious Christians, there's how the star Wormwood will come and make 2/3rds of the planet's waters "bitter"...

I'm thinking this is going to be a "thing"...
Especially if water powered vehicles begin to heavily creep into the market.


edit on 6/27/2018 by prevenge because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 05:04 PM
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I've been saying this for years!

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 05:13 PM
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It won't happen. Desalinating isn't impossible. I've seen 3' cubed boxes that can suck urine and mud out of a pothole and turn it into drinkable water. Colbert, I believe, had the developer on his show back in the early 2000's.

Creating clean water isn't rocket science. I can create clean, potable water from almost any liquid. There are hundreds of videos on youtube for how to make use of water efficiently.

The problems arise when people rely on government to do for them what they don't bother to learn to do for themselves.



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 05:16 PM
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Wait so I'm drinking dinosaur piss?



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 05:23 PM
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"Whiskey is for drinking, water is for fighting over." -- Mark Twain



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: prevenge

Potentially.

War for oil, more so access to oil was always a big thing. It was of major strategic importance in WWI and WWII. Still is to an extent. As long as the oil flows there's no need for major conflict.

We're still struggling to "replace" the oil but things are changing fast, even companies reliant on oil... Electric cars anyone? How about some bio fuel? How about a hybrid?

To be more on topic though water is a necessity for life, oil is just one for life as we know it. You best believe nations will fight for water if it's citizens are literally dying due to a lack of it. We've fought over less necessary resources in the past.

It's also a justifiable cause for revolution, say if water distribution was done poorly or favoured certain groups... Wasn't that one of the major issues facing Syria before it turned into a full-blown war? I'm sure many people protested due to whole regions going under due to drought.

We need water to live, if our needs mean others must die then I'd say that's a very human thing to do... Judging our history.

With all that being said our planet is literally covered in water. With infrastructure and a bit technological innovation we could easily supply everyone everywhere with water. Potable water.

Hopefully as the numbers crunch and that day when easily accessible water isn't available for all (it already isn't) we'll aim for the humanitarian side of our species and not the warlike side.

So yes. War for water is a real prospect and it's potential only grows as climates change, people change and those most needy of water become less and less capable of inventing or investing in alternatives than easily obtainable water.
edit on 27-6-2018 by RAY1990 because: Tidy up



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I'm thinking of people in Africa who don't have access to electricity either. Their governments ain't gonna save em.

Major world conflicts over water? Nah that isn't going to happen. Many nations can reroute, store and utilize water. Many can't though.

There's a few potential hotspots for conflict over water. Lake Victoria is shrinking and 3 nations rely on it. South Africa has had it's problems too, that won't necessarily cause wars but social unrest and conflict could happen.

Pakistan and India is another place for the potential of conflict over water.



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: prevenge


That's why Hillary and Obama killed Gaddafi Look up the Great Man Made River. Never heard of it?




In 1953, efforts to find oil in southern Libya led to the discovery of large quantities of fresh water underground. The Great Man-made River Project (GMRP) was conceived in the late 1960s and work on the project began in 1984. The project's construction was divided into five phases. The first phase required 85 million m³ of excavation and was inaugurated on 28 August 1991. The second phase (dubbed First water to Tripoli) was inaugurated on 1 September 1996. The project is owned by the Great Man-Made River Project Authority and was funded by the Gaddafi government. The primary contractor for the first phases was Dong Ah Consortium and the present main contractor is Al Nahr Company Ltd. The imported goods were made in Korea and destined to the construction of the GMR arrived by sea via the entry port of Brega (Gulf of Sidra). Cathodic corrosion protection on the pipeline was supplied by an Australian company, AMAC Corrosion Protection, based in Melbourne and delivered via Port of Benghazi.[5] The rest of goods were made in Libya. The total cost of the project is projected at more than US$25 billion.[6] Libya has completed the work to date without the financial support of major countries or loans from world banks. Since 1990 UNESCO has provided training to engineers and technicians involved with the project. The fossil aquifer from which this water is being supplied is the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System. It accumulated during the last ice age and is not currently being replenished. If 2007 rates of retrieval are not increased, the water could last a thousand years.[7][8] Independent estimates indicate that the aquifer could be depleted of water in as soon as 60 to 100 years.[9] Analysts say that the costs of the $25 billion groundwater extraction system are 10% those of desalination.[10] On 22 July during the 2011 Libyan civil war, one of the two plants making pipes for the project, the Brega Plant, was hit by a NATO air strike.[11] At a press conference on 26 July, NATO explained that rockets had been fired from within the plant area, and that military material, including multiple rocket launchers, was stored there according to intelligence findings, presenting a photo showing a BM-21 MRL as an example.[12] In this project 1 billion euros were invested for the installation of 50,000 palms of water condensation. This project was carried out by the Spanish engineer Antonio Ibáñez de Alba[13][14][15][16][17][18][19]



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

Water. Like many things turned into a political money grab.

The world is talking about energy and how hard it is to produce,the only truly clean renawable power is hydro.

Hey great idea, let's remove the dams so we can save the fish.

Wait, wasn't it commercial fishing, not the dams that killed them off? I think so.

Now it's water. Same story same people same money.

Check water regulations in regions where water is plentiful. You'll get your answers.



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

Yeah, people should stop living in deserts when resources become scarce.



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Hey man... We're talking about water not immigration


I kid of course. Sometimes people don't have the chance to move or have an inability to better their situation.

Bedouin's did alright though... I guess you just gave ma a lot to think about, intentionally or not.


a reply to: Lykan

What street hasn't been added to the proverbial monopoly board?

Only difference is in monopoly prices don't get jacked up, IRL supposedly finite resources are only worth more as demand goes up. Technology could ruin their day, even regulations. It'll be the air you breath next

edit on 27-6-2018 by RAY1990 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 06:13 PM
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a reply to: prevenge

This is the next false flag political setup.

Bush et all have been buying up water rights all over.

They have been using EPA to take control of water on your land. Some places even rain water.

Now they are going to claim false scarcity of water.

Plenty of water in the oceans. Can use movement of the waves and wind to power desalination.



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 08:06 PM
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This is nonsense.


There is more water underground than there is above. What we see is not all of it. There is no water shortage, or clean water shortage problem nor will there ever be.



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 08:07 PM
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depending on if the low yield growing season we are going to have continues as it may during a maunder minimum than the fight may be over food not water



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 08:08 PM
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www.agweb.com...

www.dtnpf.com...

check those out, may be just seeing the beginning of it



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 08:37 PM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
Wait so I'm drinking dinosaur piss?


What comes around, goes around..



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 09:15 PM
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a reply to: pianopraze

I agree wholeheartedly. Rivers like the Columbia and Mississippi are but a small part of it. We had the technology to disburse that water when my father worked for the pala verede irrigation district. Circa 1920 well established technology at that.



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: SR1TX

We've got the technology to access all sorts of things, we've got bore holes miles deep. Pumps that can move liquids over vast distances.

That's not the issue, cost is the issue. Until it's worth enough a lot of underground water will remain underground.

Those that need water seldom have the resources to get it. Otherwise they would.



posted on Jun, 28 2018 @ 04:54 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
It won't happen. Desalinating isn't impossible. I've seen 3' cubed boxes that can suck urine and mud out of a pothole and turn it into drinkable water. Colbert, I believe, had the developer on his show back in the early 2000's.

Creating clean water isn't rocket science. I can create clean, potable water from almost any liquid. There are hundreds of videos on youtube for how to make use of water efficiently.

The problems arise when people rely on government to do for them what they don't bother to learn to do for themselves.


Yes!

I approve 100% in what you're saying.
There are bottles available now that will take water clean out of the air.

BUT we are talking about actual argument between the areas of Desalinisation accessible, and the NON-Desalinisation accessible.

That makes a bit more warfare-ability at hand....



posted on Jun, 28 2018 @ 04:58 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
"Whiskey is for drinking, water is for fighting over." -- Mark Twain


Oooh recently brought up in Westworld...




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