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Eggs don't taste eggy anymore

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posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 10:41 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
I haven't really noticed. If anything, we've cut salt and fat out of our diet.

But I tend to buy in season and farmer's market when we can. We also use a couple of local butchers from time to time for meat too.

I tend to agree with the tastebud thing though. I do notice a growing tolerance to hot spice as time goes on. Thankfully, I can still taste stuff.


Just as there are acquired tastes, there are acquired distastes


Taste buds are very adaptive. Diet, health, environment, age etc. all contribute.

This is one thing I say Mandella can't touch because taste is already very personal and fluid.





edit on 23-6-2018 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 10:43 PM
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originally posted by: Toolman18
a reply to: JAGStorm

It's the sun. No one really notices but the sun is different. It affects all living things on our planet. Just like you remember eggs tasting differently, I remember being able to look at the sun for 2 or 3 seconds. Not now. Everything is changing because the sun is changing.


I totally agree with the sun and I started noticing the increase in brightness in 2008 maybe a little before and it seemed the sun when from an nice yellow to a hot white that was intensely bright. I remember my curtains would make my room pretty dark and then one spring to summer I could see the sun shining though the curtains and the room was pretty bright and I coudn't sleep in it without putting up 2-3 layers of fabric. I've tried to talk to people about this and they seem oblivious and I also see problems with these people being totally different than before, like they are bots or something.



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 10:52 PM
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National Geographic Magazine (!) did an expose on sugar a couple of years ago. They put sugar in EVERYTHING now. The FDA has ruled that if it added as a preservative rather than a sweetener, and it is a natural ingredient that already occurs in the food, that they don't have to list it in the ingredients. So next came aspartame--as a preservative, not a sweetener, of course.

They are putting aspartame in the milk, and particularly in Ham. Instead of a honey-cured ham, your actually getting an aspartame-cured ham.

How do I know? I hung a ham in my garage in 2016. For 9 weeks in the winter. Got it direct from a butcher--a full ham, not a half-ham from the grocery. I raced it home, put it in a food-grade bin a quarter full of salt, brown sugar, peppercorns, dried garlic, dried onions and some of my wife's dried herbs. Then I wrapped it in salt-covered gauze.

The ham was so flavorful it was all most too potent to eat more than a slice or two. It was best served cold.

We have our own chickens, and have a chicken tractor we move across the pasture behind the house. Chickens are actually not gramnivores--they weren't made to eat grain. They are actually insectivores. Turn em loose in tall grass pasture and they will plow it like a disc plow. They poop it up too, so if you rake it afterward, your raking their fertilizer into the pasture.

The eggs are incredible. And the yolks are flourescent orange, not a pale sickly yellow
edit on 23-6-2018 by tovenar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 10:55 PM
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a reply to: Ameilia

lol, if you're being serious what was it that convinced you?



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 10:57 PM
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originally posted by: tovenar
National Geographic Magazine (!) did an expose on sugar a couple of years ago. They put sugar in EVERYTHING now. The FDA has ruled that if it added as a preservative rather than a sweetener, and it is a natural ingredient that already occurs in the food, that they don't have to list it in the ingredients. So next came aspartame--as a preservative, not a sweetener, of course.

They are putting aspartame in the milk, and particularly in Ham. Instead of a honey-cured ham, your actually getting an aspartame-cured ham.

How do I know? I hung a ham in my garage in 2016. For 9 weeks in the winter. Got it direct from a butcher--a full ham, not a half-ham from the grocery. I raced it home, put it in a food-grade bin a quarter full of salt, brown sugar, peppercorns, dried garlic, dried onions and some of my wife's dried herbs. Then I wrapped it in salt-covered gauze.

The ham was so flavorful it was all most too potent to eat more than a slice or two. It was best served cold.

We have our own chickens, and have a chicken tractor we move across the pasture behind the house. Chickens are actually not gramnivores--they weren't made to eat grain. They are actually insectivores. Turn em loose in tall grass pasture and they will plow it like a disc plow. They poop it up too, so if you rake it afterward, your raking their fertilizer into the pasture.

The eggs are incredible. And the yolks are flourescent orange, not a pale sickly yellow


this is what I need to be doing



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Chemicals, Chemical fertilizers, hormones, food additives, growth hormones etc etc etc, just to name a few culprits.



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 11:13 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults


this is what I need to be doing


Dude. You should SO get started. Even just a little bit. If you live in an apartment, you can still grow your own herbs. That may not sound like much, until you think about buying some flour, salt, baking powder and making your own pizza dough. I add my own basil that's growing on our windowsill. And garlic I bought from the store that sprouted in the pantry, so I planted it 6 to a large barrel-pot.

I knead the herbs directly into the dough. It only needs to rise about 20 minutes. Then I flip it like little Caesar, and put it in my largest cast iron skillet. Next comes tomato sauce (home canned), cheese, and all the ingredients we can find. Bakes in 15 minutes. Costs maybe 5 bucks a pizza, but is 2" thick. After two slices you need to lie on the sofa for a couple of hours. venison sausage, mushroom and pineapple are a huge hit.

And that's just herbs from your windowsill, plus tomatoes on sale at the farmers market (buy 5 gallons and make your own sauce, freezing or canning whatever you don't eat out of the bucket on pieces of bread.)
'
Doing it yourself will cost you 1/16th to 1/4 of store-bought; but it will take a bit of your time.

But think about going to the store to cook a meal. 20 minutes to get to the store. 20 minutes in the aisles, buying extra crap you didn't plan on. and 20 minutes to check out and come home.

in that time you could have made a meal from scratch and have it on the table.
edit on 23-6-2018 by tovenar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 11:16 PM
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originally posted by: CreationBro
a reply to: JAGStorm

For heaven's sake please dont tell the Mandela effect people about this...

Pretty soon they'll start telling us that their chicken stir fry tastes like fruit loops and is a sign of timeline manipulation.

Fact: it tastes like fruit loops because of the 10 hits of acid you took, not because Dr. Who wanted to ruin your dinner.



I have mentioned it many times even the homegrown and Farmers Market food has no taste. This includes fruit and veggies and eggs and everything. I personally think it may be related to the Mandela Effect.



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 11:34 PM
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Even the Mandela effects aren't as good as they once were.



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 11:36 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: Ameilia

lol, if you're being serious what was it that convinced you?


I'm actually serious, have taken more than one step towards winterizing the house, and it wasn't just one thing. A series of articles led to me start studying this, and I believe we are in a minimum. That led to studying what happened during the last minimum.

This is what happens: there is a lot less food, more people migrate (to escape the cold? to go where there is more food?), there are more extreme weather events like droughts and floods, disease and pandemics rise, and civil unrest rises.

I've been reading about this for a few years now and so it's weird to see all the volcanoes erupting through this lens. In any case, it appears a lot more likely than what the Man Made Global Warming crowd spouts off about. I'm over 30, they told us when we were kids we would run out of oil and all kinds of other crap that wasn't even remotely correct. Thirty Years On, How Well Do Global Warming Predictions Stand Up?



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 11:56 PM
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We get our eggs from two sources, both feed the chickens regular chicken food and they are out eating bugs and stuff in the summers. The eggs taste great. Both of my suppliers give the chickens some meal worms once in a while in the winter.

Vegetarian chickens eggs do not have much flavor compared to ones that eat bugs along with chicken feed.

The smaller variety of eggs actually have more flavor, the Rocks and other large breed eggs tend to have less flavor in their larger eggs.

Some feeds have that yellow die that makes the eggs yolk yellower, that is a fake way to get a yellow egg.

I like good eggs, the ones in the store are tasteless, especially the ones that say raised on a vegetarian diet.

If you are low on zinc, foods do not have much flavor. Also if you eat highly spiced foods often, they cause a numbing of the ability to taste.



posted on Jun, 23 2018 @ 11:58 PM
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The #1 way to tell the quality of an Egg - Which in part can tell you the likely source of them.

Top quality eggs that come from natural free range chickens that aren't overpopulated for their area have the following characteristics.
- Hard shell
- Viscous whites
- Dark Orange Yolks

The more these characteristics change, the lower the quality. These are likely from 'Battery Hens'
The lowest possible quality egg has characteristics like;
- Thin weak shell
- Whites almost like water
- Pale yellow yolks


edit on 23/6/2018 by Sovaka because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 24 2018 @ 12:34 AM
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Is it possible to believe in a right to life, and yet have eggs for breakfast before a hard day of protesting?



posted on Jun, 24 2018 @ 12:48 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Try cooking them at a lower temperature.
I used to only like scrambled eggs in a restaurant. They just didn't taste the same at home. I thought the restaurant was getting better eggs or something.
Then I saw a cooking show that showed the chef cooking scrambled eggs over a low flame. In butter of course. I did that and discovered I do like eggs. Low heat. Take your time.
Maybe.



posted on Jun, 24 2018 @ 02:04 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm



had a family member visit South America recently and they mentioned how just every day foods tasted so much better there and the flavor was so intense!


i am in latin america right now and yes, everything from milk to eggs and meat and oranges and lemons are incredibly different. it is just how they should be everywere else



posted on Jun, 24 2018 @ 02:19 AM
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For bright yellow yokes, give the chickens crushed shells of clams and other seafood shell fish. Here in Japan the eggs are not so good either because of the feed (corn) and 10 eggs cost about a buck twenty USD.



posted on Jun, 24 2018 @ 03:21 AM
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As of the last year or so I've started to grow my own fruits and vegetables. When eating my first harvest i was shocked by how palatable and flavorful they actually could be!

Side note, I also have a handful of chickens that produce a pretty egg every other day or so, and the texture and taste is completely different and satisfying!

Conclusion? Mass production of foods waters down flavor and integrity. GROW YOUR OWN!

Cheers!
-StS



posted on Jun, 24 2018 @ 04:45 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

It could be the grease you cook them with. Canola oil tastes different than butter or bacon grease.

Food in general is more standardized now. The #1 factor that decides what crops are sold is shelf life. Then size and appearance. Last is flavor.



posted on Jun, 24 2018 @ 05:34 AM
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originally posted by: toms54
a reply to: JAGStorm

It could be the grease you cook them with. Canola oil tastes different than butter or bacon grease.

Food in general is more standardized now. The #1 factor that decides what crops are sold is shelf life. Then size and appearance. Last is flavor.


No guy, as someone who has moved 11 times and 5 different countries i can say that yes the flavor is not the same one, there is something wrong just as he said, for sure

You don't cook milk or oranges or grapes or lemons or any other fruit but the flavor is so strong and the lemons are ridiculous in comparison, also limes and other similar fruits. It's not that, definitely if you move around the world you can see it, he's right

edit on 24-6-2018 by WarriorMH because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 24 2018 @ 05:36 AM
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