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Londoners 'face floods, droughts and blackouts by 2050 caused by effects of climate change'

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posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: SocratesJohnson

Britain detains and kicks out around 30,000 people each year if they have no valid claim of asylum.
Most of our immigration is from EU nationals, and I have many friends from the EU in my life tribe.
They are part of our community, and after Brexit, if there is even a hint that any friend will lose 'Right to remain' we have already made plans.
Strange contrast of immigration questions isn't it.
EDIT
Sorry OP, went totally off-topic, but yep, if sea levels rise quickly then we're screwed in many different ways. We're humans though, we adapt, some win some lose, we get a new coastline is all.
edit on 19-6-2018 by CornishCeltGuy because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 12:57 PM
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a reply to: crayzeed




A serious question for you first. Where is the seas and oceans overflow pipe? Answer, there aint one.
Wouldn't evaporation fit ? Not only to counter the rise but to produce much needed fresh water . Climate science claims a few large ice ages in the past . Heck even the arctic was much warmer so there is a cycle but its not industry that is the main driver . The Sun and our position in the cosmos seems to my mind to be the elephant in the room . Maybe industry will be the savior by producing more house boats and jobs to boot



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1

The sea is cold around Britain, I've only known warm or even hot ocean outside of the UK.
I like cliff jumping but I wear a wetsuit 3 quarter, helps with the impact as well.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 01:11 PM
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these are the same people that told us in the 60s and 70s we would all be frozen

And then they told us there would be no ice or glaciers by this time.

Then they told us by this time most places would be under water.

They told us by this time there would be no fish in the ocean.

Then again by this time we would be in another ice age.

Sorry I dont believe a gawd darn thing these people say.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 01:13 PM
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Nah! by 2050 London will run out of living space with 10,000 mosques and no 'flat' space...



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 01:13 PM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1
You are correct, evaporation. But what I was trying to get over was the mass, the volume, compared to rivers and glaciers. These experts never bring rivers into any equations. Now the kicker is the more people on the planet the more potable water will be took out of the rivers, so less water into the seas which would alay the melt waters. Heh ho, that's to simple for some people to equate.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Prediction: London will CONTINUE to have moments of flood drought and blackouts, as they have had in the past, but in 2050, it will be blamed on climate change.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

It's our soil and stone that's the problem. I live 5 minutes from the sea, it's a rugged coast that's always changing, the amount of cliff falls can be crazy after a storm... The sea seldom ever touches most of the cliffs, it's the water off the land that does most damage. But when conditions are just right the cliffs are just ate away.

I love a bit of geology, where I am the hard sandstone/mudstone is only around 5-15 foot above sea level. I know further south this stone isn't even exposed. As you probably know coastal erosion is a huge problem in east Anglia.

With sea levels rising the rate of erosion will be worse, a lot worse. Our coast is weak compared to say Cornwall or a lot of the west coast.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

London is around 35m above sea level.

It's been changed slowly over 1000's of years, it's diverted rivers, moved tonnes of earth and now it's a sprawling city... Not to mention what's been done up river.

I was reading the other week just how much water has been drained from rivers for consumption, 35% in some rivers. Yet water companies lose 20% of their product just moving the damn stuff about.

You're right, industrialisation has had an effect, especially on rivers and waterways. At the same time though we can't really control the weather. If extreme rainfall becomes more common then it will have an effect on waterways. That's damage by the climate.

Where we build, how we build and how we divert water is totally on us.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

I wouldn't mind horse and cart through the city areas!

Something that used to be back in the day. I wouldn't mind owning a horse... why some people got to have them and not others?? They were here for everyone to enjoy!



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 06:16 PM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Horses are messy, guess it would drive employment a bit but who wants to shovel manure for a living.

Not to mention all the logistics involved with keeping horses, they need food and water, a place to stay and looking after.

IMO we've came too far to go backwards, cities would be practically empty with the use of horses. Not everywhere is built like Venice. Large settlements need supplies, look at the work done in London for instance. Over the last 500 years a lot of work was done to the river just to support shipping.

Problems or challanges?

Either way we change for the future it needs to be done gradually. Speedy advancement seems to be a bane to our evolution... Hence today's problems in the world.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 06:17 PM
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bulllllsshhhhiiittttt

they say, "in 100 years this and that"

they can't accurately predict anything that's happening within weeks let alone decades, they set the bar so low with that projection they know no one will remember

completely bunk garbage science



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 07:55 PM
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originally posted by: odzeandennz
a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

funny, Breitbart.com has it as the direct cause of migrants and muslins...

weird.


I think that was kinda implied in the original explanation, yes?



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: johnb
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

As will a lot of the biggest cities around the planet - most people live on the coast at or around sea level.


Well, sure. But not the really smart ones...



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 11:51 PM
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originally posted by: RAY1990
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

It's our soil and stone that's the problem. I live 5 minutes from the sea, it's a rugged coast that's always changing, the amount of cliff falls can be crazy after a storm... The sea seldom ever touches most of the cliffs, it's the water off the land that does most damage. But when conditions are just right the cliffs are just ate away.

I love a bit of geology, where I am the hard sandstone/mudstone is only around 5-15 foot above sea level. I know further south this stone isn't even exposed. As you probably know coastal erosion is a huge problem in east Anglia.

With sea levels rising the rate of erosion will be worse, a lot worse. Our coast is weak compared to say Cornwall or a lot of the west coast.

I love geology as well, and I'm fortunate my cliff is limestone, it will take more than my lifetime for it to go to sea erosion, that is for sure.
Some parts of the UK though, that conglomerate sedimentary stone is weak and will crumble quickly.



posted on Jun, 20 2018 @ 12:09 AM
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Anyway, beyond the dire predictions of the mass extinction of Londoner by floods, there's the Thames Barrier that prevents flooding. If the sea level gets higher then London will build a higher Thames Barrier. Money talks.

Wiki

We should be more concerned with people who live on Islands which will be washed away.


Scientists predict that as sea levels rise, thousands of islands will be afflicted by frequent flooding, lack of freshwater and damage to infrastructure.


S ource Indie article



posted on Jun, 20 2018 @ 01:03 AM
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a reply to: SailorJerry




these are the same people that told us in the 60s and 70s we would all be frozen

Not the sixties so much, the 70's. But these people are the ones who have understood what CO2 means for many decades. The ones who have been studying it for many decades.

In the seventies global warming due to increasing CO2 concentrations was of far greater concern than cooling. Though the press made sort of a big deal about a few scientists worries about cooling due to "global dimming", far more climatologist were worried about warming. Still are. With good reason.

From 1976, for example:

Because of the rapid diffusion of CO2 molecules within the atmosphere, both hemispheres will be subject to warming due to the atmospheric (greenhouse) effect as the CO2 content of the atmosphere builds up from the combustion of fossil fuels. Because of the differential effects of the two major sources of atmospheric pollution, the CO2 greenhouse effect warming trend should first become evident in the Southern Hemisphere. The socioeconomic and political consequences of climate change are profound. We need an early warning system such as would be provided by a more intensive international world weather watch, particularly at high northern and southern latitudes.

science.sciencemag.org...

Pre 1980 papers

edit on 6/20/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2018 @ 06:29 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

The only parts of the coast where I live that hasn't eroded in my lifetime is limestone outcrops.

Everything else eventually gives way... Makes for pretty structures though
We've got limestone rock pools that seem to go out for 300 meters. The limpets and rain seem to do more damage than the sea.

So yeah, you're good lol.



posted on Jun, 20 2018 @ 06:34 PM
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a reply to: Phage

according to the article I post the net gain of C02 added to the atmosphere every year from humans is .04% of the total C02 in the atmosphere

THAT'S A TON!

THE SKY IS FALLING!



posted on Jun, 20 2018 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: paraphi

Exactly.

The Dutch have the right idea, the potential for energy extraction is good too. We're only getting better and smarter in regards to that.

For islands though? Cost vs practicality. Unfortunately many people will just have to move as sea levels rise, a few places are already planning their exodus from what I gather.



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